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TRAVEL
By Lisa Carden and Lisa Carden,Orlando Sentinel | August 1, 1999
This is not your father's interstate: Road rage may have existed then, but not on today's scale. And just appearing vulnerable on the road can mark you as a victim.So here are hints on how to steer clear of trouble, courtesy of AAA, "Safety and Security for Women Who Travel" (Travelers' Tales Guides, $12.95), and the new and sassy "The Bad Girl's Guide to the Open Road" (Chronicle Books, $14.95).Keep the gas tank at least half-full ... or is that half-empty? Whatever. The idea is to have plenty of gas so you won't run out or be forced to leave your route in search of fuel in an unsavory neighborhood.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
Elaine Ortiz had long entertained the idea of learning to ride a motorcycle, but when the 5-foot-tall Columbia resident sat on the back of her boyfriend's Ducati 900, she found she came up a bit short. "My feet dangle off of it," said Ortiz, 29. Still, at her boyfriend's encouragement, Ortiz decided to enroll in a four-day basic riding course at Howard Community College's Rider School, and she found that there are bikes for people her size. She said when she sat on one of the motorcycles the school uses for classes, a Suzuki GZ250, she discovered there was a spot on the open road for her. Ortiz is among students taking advantage this summer of classes the school offers year-round.
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BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG | May 4, 2008
No matter what your mail might tell you, Toyota is not out to get your financial details or coax you into becoming a mystery shopper. According to Toyota's Open Road blog, there have been several attempts to obtain personal or financial information from consumers through correspondence on falsified Toyota letterhead, which is often accompanied by a forged Toyota check. "There apparently are different variations of the same [approach]," said Jon F. Thompson, editor of Open Road. "In one instance, the letter solicits the recipient's participation in a mystery-shopper program.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | January 11, 2013
Anyone who has seen a thoroughbred in full stride has probably wondered: Where would they go if they could roam free? The answer for a 4-year-old gelding named Bullet Catcher who escaped Laurel Park Friday morning is that he followed the road ahead of him. Which saved his life. “We're not really sure why he stuck to the road so closely, or how he happened to hit all the lights and make the right turns,” said Mark Rosenthal, a former jockey and owner of the gelding. “He's a lucky horse.” After throwing jockey Jeremy Rose around 9 a.m. Friday following a workout, Bullet Catcher ran past a security outpost at the back of the track - officials didn't have time to close the gate, Rosenthal said - and veered right toward the open road.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | January 11, 2013
Anyone who has seen a thoroughbred in full stride has probably wondered: Where would they go if they could roam free? The answer for a 4-year-old gelding named Bullet Catcher who escaped Laurel Park Friday morning is that he followed the road ahead of him. Which saved his life. “We're not really sure why he stuck to the road so closely, or how he happened to hit all the lights and make the right turns,” said Mark Rosenthal, a former jockey and owner of the gelding. “He's a lucky horse.” After throwing jockey Jeremy Rose around 9 a.m. Friday following a workout, Bullet Catcher ran past a security outpost at the back of the track - officials didn't have time to close the gate, Rosenthal said - and veered right toward the open road.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Story by Kevin Cowherd and Story by Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2000
I am standing in front of John King's tidy brick rancher in Parkville when he rolls up on his 2000 Harley-Davidson twin-cam Classic, and the sight just about takes my breath away. It is a muggy, late summer evening and the last golden rays of the sun dance off the flawless black paint job and light up the polished chrome as King revs the engine lightly, then lets it idle with that distinctive, throbbing blob-blob-blob sound. I have never been on a hog in my life, but at this moment, I want one. Bad. I want an endless stretch of open road and blue skies.
NEWS
July 27, 2006
Here's a paradox: The high price of gasoline makes driving more worthwhile. Expensive fuel induces people to cut down on trips, and that makes the roads less crowded for everyone else. You may not have noticed, but Maryland and the rest of the country have seen some evidence of this over the past month. As the cost of a gallon of regular edged up over $3, traffic dropped off. O.K., just a wee little bit, but still - there are fewer cars out there than there were a year ago. Traffic monitoring by the State Highway Administration shows that the number of cars on I-95 in Baltimore is down 5 percent to 6 percent during the past three weekends compared with Saturdays and Sundays in July 2005; there appears to be a somewhat smaller decline on weekdays.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
Elaine Ortiz had long entertained the idea of learning to ride a motorcycle, but when the 5-foot-tall Columbia resident sat on the back of her boyfriend's Ducati 900, she found she came up a bit short. "My feet dangle off of it," said Ortiz, 29. Still, at her boyfriend's encouragement, Ortiz decided to enroll in a four-day basic riding course at Howard Community College's Rider School, and she found that there are bikes for people her size. She said when she sat on one of the motorcycles the school uses for classes, a Suzuki GZ250, she discovered there was a spot on the open road for her. Ortiz is among students taking advantage this summer of classes the school offers year-round.
BUSINESS
By Joyce Lain Kennedy | December 24, 1990
DEAR JOYCE: I notice you focus on white-collar jobs, but I want to trade in a white-collar job to become a truck driver. I've been a drafter, but my company is laying off. Please advise me as I don't want to foul up. -- J.J.Smart fellow. I've had complaints about unscrupulous private truck-driving schools.A happier story features Gordon Hafemann, 43, who recently graduated from U.S. Trucking School in Midway, Colo. A former fleet manager for a car rental company, Hafemann this year decided to change his life.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer | June 1, 1994
It's a slow, meandering journey from New Jersey to Georgia on a mule.That's how Keri Martin likes it. She's a 40-year-old woman with no permanent home who travels the country on her mule, Samuel -- 3 miles per hour when she walks him, 2 1/2 miles per hour when she rides."
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | July 29, 2011
Although her four daughters and seven grandchildren didn't have a clue what she was up to, Phyllis Hare was busy on a recent Saturday morning in Westminster checking off another item on her "bucket list" - challenges she's determined to try during her lifetime. She was taking motorcycle lessons - in a class for women only - at Carroll Community College. In the parking lot of the Washington Road campus, with a fleet of motorcycles and bright orange cones laid out across the course, Hare, 63, said she was setting an example for her daughters and grandkids.
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG | May 4, 2008
No matter what your mail might tell you, Toyota is not out to get your financial details or coax you into becoming a mystery shopper. According to Toyota's Open Road blog, there have been several attempts to obtain personal or financial information from consumers through correspondence on falsified Toyota letterhead, which is often accompanied by a forged Toyota check. "There apparently are different variations of the same [approach]," said Jon F. Thompson, editor of Open Road. "In one instance, the letter solicits the recipient's participation in a mystery-shopper program.
NEWS
July 27, 2006
Here's a paradox: The high price of gasoline makes driving more worthwhile. Expensive fuel induces people to cut down on trips, and that makes the roads less crowded for everyone else. You may not have noticed, but Maryland and the rest of the country have seen some evidence of this over the past month. As the cost of a gallon of regular edged up over $3, traffic dropped off. O.K., just a wee little bit, but still - there are fewer cars out there than there were a year ago. Traffic monitoring by the State Highway Administration shows that the number of cars on I-95 in Baltimore is down 5 percent to 6 percent during the past three weekends compared with Saturdays and Sundays in July 2005; there appears to be a somewhat smaller decline on weekdays.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 11, 2005
IT'S A rare but wonderful column that generates as much unexpected response as last week's did about the tantalizing sign advertising the distance to Cove Fort, Utah, on Interstate 70 just west of the Baltimore Beltway. "I must disagree with the writer who complained that the big new mileage sign was a waste of money. I, for one, love it," said Glenn Hoge. "I see it as a reminder that there's a great big country out there beyond our immediate surroundings, ready and waiting for us to come out and explore.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 28, 2003
BANI MAQAN, Iraq - The first crack in Saddam Hussein's formidable northern defense line appeared here yesterday at this Iraqi checkpoint on the main highway into Kirkuk, a city rich in oil and strained by ethnic tensions. This post, formerly bristling with soldiers and Iraqi border guards who exacted bribes from travelers passing through the demilitarized zone, was unexpectedly abandoned yesterday afternoon by Iraqi soldiers. The soldiers had defended it since 1991. They left quietly, loading onto trucks and slipping quickly away.
NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 24, 2002
KINGS CONTRIVANCE resident JoAnn Maxfield isn't a stereotypical biker, but that's because the stereotype is a misconception, she said. Maxfield may wear business suits during the week, but on weekends she suits up in her "leathers" and hits the open road with her husband, Rocky, 45, and 15 or 20 of their closest biker friends. The couple attends motorcycle rallies all over the country. At 5-feet-3, JoAnn Maxfield, 44, is a petite woman whose demeanor at work is "very businesslike," said Thomas Hare, a fiscal manager at the Department of Public Works, where JoAnn handles customer service for the director's office.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2002
The 13th annual Road to the Arts weekend, which celebrates the opening of the 2002-2003 gallery season in Howard County, kicks off tomorrow and features nine free shows and receptions in nine galleries, all within a 20-minute drive of one another. "It's really sort of a promotional effort to encourage people to come out and find out what and who the local galleries are," said Amy Poff, deputy director of the Howard County Center for the Arts, which sponsors the event. "I would love for people to visit all [nine]
NEWS
By Nick Sortal | April 14, 2002
Shari Bernhard pedals down a quiet road in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., laughing and chattering with friends all the way, doing something that frustrated her six years ago -- riding a bicycle. A throbbing neck and sleepless nights were getting the best of her. It looked like a cycling tour of the coast of Washington state in 1995 would be her last, even though she loved seeing the countryside by bicycle. But a couple of months later, a friend riding a recumbent -- which means "lying down" or "resting" -- offered his bike for a test ride.
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