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Open Meetings Law

NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1999
The task force charged with examining the state Injured Workers Insurance Fund recommended yesterday that the 80-year-old agency be subject to financial scrutiny by the Maryland Insurance Administration.The panel, which faced a Nov. 1 deadline to make its initial report to the governor, also recommended that IWIF and its board members be exempted from the state public meeting and records laws and state ethics statutes. IWIF officials had complained that conducting its business in public put them at a competitive disadvantage.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2000
The Anne Arundel County Council violated state law last spring when a majority of the panel met privately to discuss the pending 2000-2001 county budget, the Maryland Open Meetings Law Compliance Board ruled yesterday. Four of seven council members - a quorum - gathered May 22 to talk about the budget, including specific projects in the attending members' districts, three days before a final vote on the $1 billion package. "It certainly wasn't intentional," said council Vice Chairwoman Shirley Murphy.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2003
Members of an environmental group say that Anne Arundel County officials broke state law when they convened a meeting to discuss the future of Franklin Point beach in a van and prohibited a radio reporter from recording another meeting. Amanda Spake, president of South Arundel Citizens for Responsible Development, said Friday that she e-mailed a letter of complaint to Assistant Attorney General Jack Schwartz, counsel to the state's Open Meetings Compliance Board, on Wednesday. Schwartz, who confirmed receipt of the e-mail, said that county officials have 30 days to respond.
NEWS
October 27, 1996
An editing change in last Sunday's Education Beat made it appear incorrectly that the state Board of Education violates Maryland's open-meetings law at monthly luncheons closed to the press. The law defines the business that public bodies may conduct in closed sessions.Pub Date: 10/27/96
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 6, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- In key action yesterday, a Senate subcommittee rejected attempts by local governments and the Schaefer administration to weaken a revision of the state's open-meetings law.The five-member subcommittee chaired by Sen. Gerald W. Winegrad, D-Anne Arundel, was especially established to deal with the open-meetings law revisions backed by a group of Maryland newspapers and broadcasters. The full Economic and Environmental Affairs Committee is expected to vote on the revised bill Friday.
NEWS
By Staff report | May 3, 1993
Manchester Councilman Geoffrey S. Black said about eight town employees spoke at an executive session of the Town Council last week.Mayor Earl A. J. "Tim" Warehime Jr. and the council invited town employees to the closed Tuesday night meeting in a memo dated April 26. The memo said the purpose of the meeting was to receive comment, criticism and other information relevant to town government.The memo said the meeting was closed because "it is quite possible that matters involving personnel may be mentioned and/or discussed."
NEWS
By Hanah Cho | July 26, 2005
The Maryland Court of Special Appeals has ruled against an Ellicott City attorney's four-year legal challenge to the Howard County Board of Education for alleged violations of the state open meetings act. The court's decision - made public yesterday - upholds an August 2003 lower court ruling by now-retired Howard County Circuit Court Judge James B. Dudley, who said Allen Dyer did not have legal standing to sue members of the school board. Dudley's decision prompted state lawmakers to clarify the open-meetings law, which had stated that only a person "adversely affected" by an alleged violation could take a public body to court.
NEWS
December 4, 1991
A non-profit, government watchdog group lauded state Sen. Gerald Winegrad, D-Annapolis, last week for his efforts this year to improve Maryland's open-meetings law and to limit the influence of special-interest groups.Winegrad, the co-chairman of a Senate subcommittee onopen meetings, helped pass reforms that give citizens access to mostgovernment meetings but still allow meetings to be closed for "legitimate reasons," said Phil Andrews, executive director of Common Cause/Maryland.The three-term senator also helped enact limits on contributions from political action committees to a state or county candidate, Andrews said.
NEWS
August 14, 2014
The article, "UM will give up $31 million to end ACC exit fee fight," (Aug. 9), really misses the big point, and that is the corruption in Maryland state government exhibited by President Wallace Loh and the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland in giving away $31 million of taxpayers' money in order to enter the Big Ten. When the announcement regarding the shift from the ACC to the Big Ten was first made public, I immediately filed...
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | May 15, 1995
A Baltimore County circuit judge has expanded the circumstances under which the county Board of Appeals must deliberate in public.Judge John F. Fader II ruled last week that under the state open meetings law, development plan approval cases are a natural extension of the zoning process.The law states that in cases dealing with zoning or "any other zoning matters," administrative bodies must deliberate and announce decisions in a public meeting that is properly advertised.In October 1993, another county circuit judge ordered the appeals board to hold public deliberations in zoning decisions.
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