Advertisement
HomeCollectionsOpen For Business
IN THE NEWS

Open For Business

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Mark Hyman and Peter Schmuck and Mark Hyman,Staff Writers | February 18, 1993
The gates will be unlocked today when Orioles pitchers and catchers report to Twin Lakes Park in Sarasota, Fla., in preparation for tomorrow's first official workout of the spring. All 28 training camps will be open for business, though there was room to wonder after the owners voted in December to reopen Major League Baseball's collective bargaining agreement.NBA: Salary cap is 53 percent of designated team revenues.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
Two years ago, Baltimore rolled out the red carpet, and then some, for the War of 1812 bicentennial celebration, welcoming tens of thousands of visitors to commemorate what some have called the second war for American independence. This year, they'll be doing it again. And just about all of Maryland will be helping out. On Thursday at Prince George's County's Bladensburg Waterfront Park, Gov. Martin O'Malley joined other state, federal and local officials in cutting the ribbon to officially open the Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail, a 560-mile land and water route connecting War of 1812-related sites in Maryland, Washington and Virginia.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 5, 2007
The Westminster Senior and Community Center will remain closed today because of power outages, officials said. Underground wiring failed Sunday afternoon, reducing the building's electricity by a third, county officials said. There is no air conditioning and limited lighting at the Stoner Avenue facility. The Bureau of Aging's administrative offices in the same building will be open for business, officials said. Seniors who have transportation are invited to attend any of the other four senior centers in the county.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, Lorraine Mirabella and Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
As much of the Baltimore region shut down, some businesses made sure they could stay open - come hurricane and high water. The Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel brought in sandbags, ordered $30,000 in extra food and arranged for employees to stay overnight for the duration of the storm. The owner of Kooper's Tavern and two other Fells Point bars prepared to put his workers up Monday and Tuesday nights in his bed-and-breakfast, conveniently emptied by cancellations. Safeway rearranged shifts as it trucked in ice and extra bottled water to its grocery stores.
FEATURES
By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | May 8, 1994
Next week is Small Business Week, and nowadays you have more reasons than ever to celebrate if you own one of the more than 20 million small businesses in this country.While larger companies faltered during the recession, many of you flourished. Virtually all new jobs today are coming from new business start-ups, and while larger companies laid off 1.4 million workers from 1988 to 1990, companies with fewer than 20 employees hired more than 4 million new employees.Some of the most successful working women I know run small businesses, and they share certain characteristics and skills that have helped make them successful.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1998
It's axiomatic in the restaurant business that you don't want to open for business on a Saturday night without first having a couple of less-hectic days under your belt, to break in the staff and work out the bugs.The Ravens will be operating under the same philosophy tonight, when they open their new stadium for a dress rehearsal.The event, open to 53,000 season-ticket holders, features limited action: a team practice that will last a little more than an hour. And don't look for laser shows or headlining performers -- that will come when the place opens for real, for the Sept.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2005
As Maryland's first Republican chief executive in more than a generation, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. promised to bring a fresh ethos to a state with a reputation for high taxes and burdensome regulations. "The message has been that Maryland is not open for business," Ehrlich told his opponent, then-Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, during a Chamber of Commerce candidates forum in 2002. In two of his three State of the State addresses, the governor has declared that his victory means Maryland is now "open for business."
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2002
LA PLATA - From what remains of the office supply company - a 30-foot pile of wood and plaster - it seemed reasonable to expect that it would be some time before Shipp Data Supplies would reopen. "What do you mean? We're open for business today," said Vicki Shipp, trying to convince cleanup crews that she was serious. Though it will be months before she and her husband reopen their storefront in downtown La Plata, they are taking orders by fax at their home, she said. Days ago, Charles Street, La Plata's main street, was a thriving commercial district.
BUSINESS
November 5, 1990
Standard Register has expanded its STANFAST business forms printing center by adding a warehouse and distribution center at 3741 Commerce Drive in Arbutus.Trans Union, a credit information company, expanded and relocated its mid-Atlantic division to 7250 Parkway Drive, Suite 540, in Hanover.GBS Corp., a business counseling organization, relocated its headquarters to 7134 Columbia Gateway Drive in Columbia.Terumo Medical Corporation in Elkton joined the Aberdeen Proving Ground Federal Credit Union.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, Lorraine Mirabella and Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
As much of the Baltimore region shut down, some businesses made sure they could stay open - come hurricane and high water. The Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel brought in sandbags, ordered $30,000 in extra food and arranged for employees to stay overnight for the duration of the storm. The owner of Kooper's Tavern and two other Fells Point bars prepared to put his workers up Monday and Tuesday nights in his bed-and-breakfast, conveniently emptied by cancellations. Safeway rearranged shifts as it trucked in ice and extra bottled water to its grocery stores.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2011
The National Pinball Museum, forced out of Washington after losing its lease earlier this year, will be moving into the Power Plant Live complex. Trucks began moving owner David Silverman's vast collection of flipper-type pinball machines into a building at 608 Water St. Wednesday. Silverman, a Silver Spring-based landscape designer who has been collecting the machines for some 40 years, said he hopes to open for business by the end of November. "We're moving in now," he said early Thursday morning as he drove into Baltimore.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,chris.guy@baltsun.com | October 12, 2008
Sarah Rosario and other longtime Annapolis residents say they remember the demise of the old Parole Shopping Center pretty much as a slow fade, with retailers large and small slip-sliding away for years. The Kmart packed up and moved to Edgewater, Sears jumped down the road to the Westfield Annapolis mall, and Woodward and Lothrop was gobbled up by competitors. Somebody must have turned out that old white sign as the 32-acre site went under the bulldozer. Lately, Rosario and 380 colleagues - all decked out in identical red shirts and khaki slacks - are manning the cornerstone Target store for the $500 million Annapolis Towne Centre at Parole.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large | June 18, 2008
For a while it wasn't clear whether the basement of the Admiral Fell Inn in Fells Point, where most notably Cindy Wolf's Savannah once was, would ever be another restaurant. The last restaurant there, True, died a quiet death last fall, and since then the dining room has been used for private events. But now Sherry Cohen, director of food and beverage for Admiral Fell Inn Catering, and her husband Avi, who is the chef, have opened Fin. Actually the full name is, oddly enough, Fin Steak & Seafood.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | April 26, 2008
Towson Ford is gone. So are Baltimore's Apple Lincoln Mercury and Miller Motors Buick. The family businesses all shut down last year, after a combined 200 years of operation, along with a half-dozen other Maryland car dealerships. This month, Dulaney Lincoln Mercury of Timonium shut its doors after 60 years. For the first time in at least a decade, Maryland had a net loss of automobile sellers last year, according to the Maryland Automobile Dealers Association. Nationwide, 621 dealerships representing the big three Detroit manufacturers closed last year, according to the Automotive News Dealer Census.
NEWS
June 5, 2007
The Westminster Senior and Community Center will remain closed today because of power outages, officials said. Underground wiring failed Sunday afternoon, reducing the building's electricity by a third, county officials said. There is no air conditioning and limited lighting at the Stoner Avenue facility. The Bureau of Aging's administrative offices in the same building will be open for business, officials said. Seniors who have transportation are invited to attend any of the other four senior centers in the county.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
As Southwest Airlines was gearing up to cut the ribbon last night on its new, modern terminal at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, event planners wanted to highlight some of the 34 daily destinations available from there on the carrier. So, some special guests were added to the list of 1,200 invitees to the ceremony held inside the $264 million terminal that will open for public tours Saturday and for business Wednesday: a 7-foot crab from Baltimore; Pete and Penny, two penguins from Orlando, Fla.; an Elvis from Las Vegas, and a guitar player from Nashville, Tenn.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
Two years ago, Baltimore rolled out the red carpet, and then some, for the War of 1812 bicentennial celebration, welcoming tens of thousands of visitors to commemorate what some have called the second war for American independence. This year, they'll be doing it again. And just about all of Maryland will be helping out. On Thursday at Prince George's County's Bladensburg Waterfront Park, Gov. Martin O'Malley joined other state, federal and local officials in cutting the ribbon to officially open the Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail, a 560-mile land and water route connecting War of 1812-related sites in Maryland, Washington and Virginia.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large | June 18, 2008
For a while it wasn't clear whether the basement of the Admiral Fell Inn in Fells Point, where most notably Cindy Wolf's Savannah once was, would ever be another restaurant. The last restaurant there, True, died a quiet death last fall, and since then the dining room has been used for private events. But now Sherry Cohen, director of food and beverage for Admiral Fell Inn Catering, and her husband Avi, who is the chef, have opened Fin. Actually the full name is, oddly enough, Fin Steak & Seafood.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2005
As Maryland's first Republican chief executive in more than a generation, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. promised to bring a fresh ethos to a state with a reputation for high taxes and burdensome regulations. "The message has been that Maryland is not open for business," Ehrlich told his opponent, then-Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, during a Chamber of Commerce candidates forum in 2002. In two of his three State of the State addresses, the governor has declared that his victory means Maryland is now "open for business."
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2004
The notoriously secretive National Security Agency threw - well, cracked - open its doors yesterday for a momentous, first-ever event. A press conference. It's a sign of further change at the code-making and breaking institution at Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County that it would organize such an event - after all, even its annual budget is classified. For the past few years the agency has been offering peeks at some of the tightly held information about itself and its significant impact on the local economy.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.