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Open Enrollment

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BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | October 13, 2011
This month and next, many workers will be called on to choose their health benefits for next year. And the choices made during open enrollment, well, you'll be paying for them for at least a year. It's a good idea to read all the fine print to make sure you understand just how much you will be paying. The plan with the lowest premium isn't necessarily the cheapest if you consider deductibles and co-pays. And more employers will be pushing more of the cost of coverage on workers' shoulders through higher deductibles and other out-of-pocket expenses.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The state health insurance exchange continued enrolling consumers in Medicaid, adding almost 22,000 new people to the rolls in the last month, according to a report released Friday. The report said 376,850 people in the state have gained coverage under the federal-state program for the low-income since the exchange launched a year ago under the federal Affordable Care Act. Another 2,425 people bought private insurance plans in the last month, though the open enrollment period is closed.
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NEWS
By From Staff Reports | April 30, 1995
Parents of children now in eighth grade who believe their children will be redistricted to a different high school for their sophomore year can apply to enroll them in that high school for 1995-1996, the Howard County School Board said Thursday night.The decision was prompted by a number of parents who have expressed interest in being able to send their children to the same high school all four years.The school system is scheduled to redistrict the secondary schools next winter for the 1996-1997 school year, when two additional high schools are expected to open.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
A day after Maryland committed to a gradual launch of its health exchange, state officials are still working out some key details — including where the opening day sign-up will be held — but experts say it could be a way to avoid a repeat of last year's botched rollout.  Several health experts said the approach that limits enrollment in the first few days could allow Maryland to "kick the tires" on its new website. "It's a controlled way to open enrollment," said Karen Pollitz, senior fellow at the Kaiser Family Foundation.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2000
Howard County voters will make their choices Tuesday from a pool of 17 school board candidates running for two open seats. The four with the most votes will advance to the general election in November -- but residents can vote for only two candidates. One candidate, Cheri J. Herschman, has dropped out of the race, although her name remains on the ballot. Issues that often surfaced during the primary campaign include open enrollment, redistricting, treatment of older schools and how the school board operates.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2000
Members of a school-reform panel slated to give a report on the Howard County school system March 1 discussed possible recommendations yesterday -- and mulled the merits of the policy that allows parents to move their children from one school to another. The Leadership Committee on School Equity, a 24-member group formed by Superintendent Michael E. Hickey and County Executive James N. Robey, is studying issues relating to resources, programs, staff, accountability and equity in Howard schools.
NEWS
By Marian Morton and Marian Morton,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2001
The Howard County Board of Education is expected to vote on guidelines tonight that would firmly close the door on open enrollment in the county's public schools in all but a handful of specific circumstances. The board voted at its March 20 meeting to extend a moratorium on open enrollment implemented last year that ended the county's policy of open enrollment in its public schools. Before the moratorium, parents could effectively hand-pick their children's schools as long as they could provide transportation to schools outside their districts and if they chose schools that were below capacity.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2001
Parents who choose not to send their children to their neighborhood schools might not have that option much longer. The Howard County school board is considering doing away with open enrollment -- a debated policy that allows parents to move their children to other schools within the district as long as they provide transportation. The practice is popular in Howard, but it has come under scrutiny in recent months because of the perceived inequities at older schools. To study the policy, board members in April placed a one-year moratorium on open enrollment, banning further enrollment of county students in schools outside their home areas.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1999
The exodus of dozens of Columbia children from a diverse middle school to a mostly white one in the country has sparked questions about the school system's transfer policy and about perceived inequities in Howard County schools.Parents of 50 children from one neighborhood, Clemens Crossing, switched from Wilde Lake Middle School to the rural Lime Kiln Middle School in Fulton after lobbying the school board to allow open enrollment, The Sun reported yesterday. They and other parents paid $37,800 a year to put 63 children on private buses to the school.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2004
The Impact: How three households confront health coverage decisions They hope options include dentist For Bryan Butler, the financial reward of his job is not the paycheck as much as the health care benefits. "It's not like we make great salaries, and we work kind of long hours. The benefits have always been important and they are pretty good," says the 42-year-old educator with the Maryland Cooperative Extension in Carroll County. He pays about $212 a month for health insurance for himself, his wife, Karen, and their four children, ages 9 through 13. It would cost three times that much if he had to buy insurance on his own, Butler figures.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
More than 372,500 people have enrolled in insurance through the Maryland health exchange as of May 31, exchange officials said Friday. More than 300,300 individuals gained coverage through Medicaid, including 95,889 converted from a former state program for low income people. Another 72,207 enrolled in private insurance plans. Open enrollment ended March 31 for private plans, though some who notified the exchange that they were having trouble signing up were given more time. Those who have a change in family, residence, income, work status or other consideration may qualify for a special enrollment.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
Pregnant and about to lose her health insurance, Genevieve Acker was eager to buy new coverage on the Maryland health exchange. But seven weeks after she picked plans on the Maryland Health Connection, she remained without insurance cards for herself, her husband and 2-year-old daughter. The insurer she picked told her it was never notified by the exchange, which kept telling Acker the problem would be fixed. "I got the runaround time and time again," said the New Market resident.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
Maryland's health exchange officials say they have contacted all 18,000 people who reported having trouble signing up for insurance through the state's online marketplace before the end of open enrollment in April and added 7,500 people to the rolls. Others enrolled on their own and still more were duplicates, said Alison Walker, a spokeswoman for the exchange. She couldn't say if there were others left who had technical trouble with the glitch-prone site, but she said they'd still be able to enroll.
HEALTH
By a Baltimore Sun reporter | April 18, 2014
Nearly 329,000 people have enrolled in insurance through the Maryland health exchange, officials reported Friday. As of April 15, 262,619 people have gained Medicaid coverage and 66,203 enrolled in a private plan sold on the exchange website. Open enrollment ended March 31 for private plans, though some who notified the exchange that they were having trouble signing up were given more time. Those who have a change in family, residence, income, work status or other consideration may qualify for a special enrollment.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
One last round of website crashes, jammed call center lines, frustrations and delays marked the end of Maryland's first open enrollment period under the Affordable Care Act and ensured that the launch of the Maryland Health Connection will go down as one of the most expensive failures of governance in the state's history. A full accounting of how Maryland failed so badly while other states handled open enrollment with relative ease can't come soon enough. That said, Obamacare is not a website.
HEALTH
The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
The number of Marylanders enrolled in private plans through the state's health exchange as of March 8 has reached 40,693, according to a weekly report issued Friday. The total number of people enrolled in plans through the exchange is 234,363, which includes 193,670 residents signed up for Medicaid. Open enrollment for health care coverage under the Affordable Care Act runs through March 31.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2005
Following a staff recommendation, the Howard County Board of Education voted yesterday to extend a moratorium on open enrollment in its public schools. Amid criticism that the practice was elitist and benefited only certain school communities, the board had placed a freeze on the option since 2000. But there are a few exceptions, including assigning students to schools out of their districts for safety and disciplinary reasons. Under a minor change approved by the board yesterday, parents who apply for a child's transfer to an area where a home is being built or purchased may be asked to pay tuition or return the child to the former district if the purchase is not settled within 60 days.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
After the state severed ties with the contractor that built its problem-plagued health insurance exchange, officials face the looming question of what to do with it - continue throwing money toward fixing it or replace it. Every option is potentially fraught with more technical headaches and expense. Exchange officials are mulling five possible scenarios in the wake of the disastrous launch of the exchange, where technical difficulties have thwarted thousands of people from signing up for health insurance.
NEWS
February 11, 2014
The first hearing of a new General Assembly oversight committee for Maryland's health insurance exchange made clear just how badly dysfunctional it remains four months after its botched launch. Despite millions in additional costs - some of which will be covered under existing, fixed-price contracts, and some of which won't - the software at the core of Maryland's exchange website remains deeply flawed and continues to require extensive manual work-arounds that frustrate consumers and slow the pace of enrollment.
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