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By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,Sun Staff | March 6, 2000
A fight brewing on the back burners of cyberspace has erupted into a nationwide brawl over who will provide high-speed Internet access to millions of homes over cable television lines. In one corner are cable TV companies, who own the lines and transmit what they choose. Across the ring is a band of Internet Service Providers (ISPs), big telephone companies and consumer groups who want access to cable's high-speed pipelines into the nation's residential areas. In between is nasty talk about monopolies and unfair competition.
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EXPLORE
July 10, 2012
In response to the letter, "New policies eating away at Columbia's open space" (July 5): Open space to me means open access, not necessarily mowed turf. I appreciate the recent efforts of the Columbia Association, BGE, and others to reduce unnecessary mowing. Mowing is expensive in terms of labor, equipment, gas, and especially in terms of damage to the environment. My yard backs up to a CA pond, and for the past couple of years CA has been leaving an unmowed buffer between the path and a willow tree at the waters edge.
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NEWS
By Irving Pressley McPhail | July 15, 2003
AS I CLOSELY followed the affirmative action debates regarding the University of Michigan's admissions policies, I knew that the Supreme Court's ruling would have a profound effect on higher education and its commitment to embracing diversity. As an African-American who attended three Ivy League universities in the late 1960s and 1970s, when diversity was just beginning to be a priority, I celebrate the court's ruling knowing that today's classrooms will continue to have a true opportunity to reflect our global society.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2011
More than 10,000 items in the Walters Art Museum — about a third of the total collection — can now be viewed and downloaded online for free, without copyright restrictions. The museum's collection is "basically public domain," said Dylan Kinnett, manager of web and social media at the Walters. "Something like this would be less likely at a museum with contemporary art, where the artist is still alive or the estate is still active. " The free online accessibility, which complements the Walters' free admission policy, allows viewers to see works spanning several eras, from ancient Egypt and the Americas to 18th- and 19th-century Europe.
EXPLORE
July 10, 2012
In response to the letter, "New policies eating away at Columbia's open space" (July 5): Open space to me means open access, not necessarily mowed turf. I appreciate the recent efforts of the Columbia Association, BGE, and others to reduce unnecessary mowing. Mowing is expensive in terms of labor, equipment, gas, and especially in terms of damage to the environment. My yard backs up to a CA pond, and for the past couple of years CA has been leaving an unmowed buffer between the path and a willow tree at the waters edge.
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | July 13, 2007
NEW YORK -- Proposed rules for a federal auction of valuable radio airwaves could entice tech giants such as Google Inc. to compete in the wireless market and spur the development of innovative consumer gadgets that work across any network. But industry experts say a Federal Communications Commission plan with such "open access" requirements faces bruising opposition from major carriers such as AT&T and Verizon Wireless. The skirmish is over what will become of the multibillion-dollar radio spectrum that TV stations are giving up as they switch to digital signals in 2009.
NEWS
June 30, 2005
THE SUPREME Court this week issued two decisions involving the Internet. The bigger headlines went to the ruling that made file-sharing services liable for users' copyright violations. But the other decision - saying cable systems don't have to share their lines with other Internet providers - may have the more profound impact. This ruling hinged on whether cable broadband providers must be classified as telecommunications services by the Federal Communications Commission and thus must share with competitors their connections to households.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1995
A consortium of regional utilities, including Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., yesterday proposed a plan to modify the nation's largest and oldest power pool system in response to the federal government's mandate to foster competition.The utilities' plan to alter the existing Pennsylvania/New Jersey/Maryland Interconnection, known as the PJM system, would grant bulk power buyers greater access to transmission lines and cause other changes in the way regional electricity is supplied.The plan comes in the wake of a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission effort to introduce competition to benefit so-called "wholesale" entities, such as municipalities, energy brokers and power cooperatives.
NEWS
March 2, 2009
Make the wealthy pay more FICA tax Given the current economic meltdown, is there any rational reason to keep the FICA income tax cap at the current maximum of $106,800? As it stands, tax revenue from FICA, some $838 billion in 2006, represents approximately 35 percent of federal tax revenue. Eliminating or altering the cap could go a long way toward reducing the horrific deficits with which we risk saddling our children and their children, and probably their children. President Barack Obama, who indicated he might reconsider the cap during his campaign, could keep his promise not to increase taxes for those earning less than $200,000 by leaving things as they are for people with incomes from $106,800 to $200,000 and dropping the cap for those above the higher figure.
NEWS
October 14, 1999
TO LIVE IN suburbia these days is to fret about growth: Sometimes, it seems, there's too much of everything: too much building, too many people, even too many plants.Plant experts patrolling in Howard County worry about an invasive, flowering weed called loosestrife. Multiflora roses and even Queen Anne's lace are threats as well. In time, they could kill enough benign vegetation to threaten the ecosystem that nurtures them.A homeowners group opposes an elder care development. It's too big, they say, and potentially damaging aesthetically.
NEWS
March 2, 2009
Make the wealthy pay more FICA tax Given the current economic meltdown, is there any rational reason to keep the FICA income tax cap at the current maximum of $106,800? As it stands, tax revenue from FICA, some $838 billion in 2006, represents approximately 35 percent of federal tax revenue. Eliminating or altering the cap could go a long way toward reducing the horrific deficits with which we risk saddling our children and their children, and probably their children. President Barack Obama, who indicated he might reconsider the cap during his campaign, could keep his promise not to increase taxes for those earning less than $200,000 by leaving things as they are for people with incomes from $106,800 to $200,000 and dropping the cap for those above the higher figure.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN REPORTER | August 31, 2007
In 2001, it was an uphill battle for Sourcefire to find financiers. The new technology company had developed free network security software using open-source methods, meaning, essentially, that it was created and modified by an online community of public volunteers and that anyone could access its source code. Such development went against traditional corporate thinking, which advises that intellectual property be kept close to the vest, protected by patents and accessible only when purchased.
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | July 13, 2007
NEW YORK -- Proposed rules for a federal auction of valuable radio airwaves could entice tech giants such as Google Inc. to compete in the wireless market and spur the development of innovative consumer gadgets that work across any network. But industry experts say a Federal Communications Commission plan with such "open access" requirements faces bruising opposition from major carriers such as AT&T and Verizon Wireless. The skirmish is over what will become of the multibillion-dollar radio spectrum that TV stations are giving up as they switch to digital signals in 2009.
NEWS
January 25, 2006
Joshua Watson's short and tragic life was anything but ordinary. He entered the world on Dec. 1, 2004, and left it one month later on New Year's Day, 2005, with a fractured skull, a broken leg and blunt-force injuries to his tiny back, all allegedly inflicted by his parents. Joshua's death, like his life, has made for a remarkable statistic; he was the only Baltimore City child known to have died in 2005 as the result of physical abuse or neglect. In a city where 34 abused or neglected children died from 2001 through 2004 - 10 in 2004 alone - the decline in such appalling events is cause for hope that it marks a new trend and not a one-time anomaly.
NEWS
June 30, 2005
THE SUPREME Court this week issued two decisions involving the Internet. The bigger headlines went to the ruling that made file-sharing services liable for users' copyright violations. But the other decision - saying cable systems don't have to share their lines with other Internet providers - may have the more profound impact. This ruling hinged on whether cable broadband providers must be classified as telecommunications services by the Federal Communications Commission and thus must share with competitors their connections to households.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2004
Manuel Llinas knew his career was at stake. The young scientist had just finished work on an eye-catching paper on the genome of a parasite that causes malaria. Now he and his lab director faced a critical decision: where to submit the article for publication. A prestigious journal such as Science would draw attention and help Llinas when he interviewed for faculty jobs at top research institutions. But Llinas and Joseph DeRisi -- his mentor at the University of California, San Francisco -- chose the once-unthinkable: They submitted the paper to PLoS Biology, a free online journal that had yet to publish its first edition.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2004
Manuel Llinas knew his career was at stake. The young scientist had just finished work on an eye-catching paper on the genome of a parasite that causes malaria. Now he and his lab director faced a critical decision: where to submit the article for publication. A prestigious journal such as Science would draw attention and help Llinas when he interviewed for faculty jobs at top research institutions. But Llinas and Joseph DeRisi -- his mentor at the University of California, San Francisco -- chose the once-unthinkable: They submitted the paper to PLoS Biology, a free online journal that had yet to publish its first edition.
NEWS
By Diane Winston | December 23, 1990
For more than 40 years, Jewish and Christian scholars have eagerly awaited translations of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the 2,000-year old papyrus and leather documents that illuminate an ancient Jewish community.But now, a growing debate about the nature of anti-Semitic remarks by the scrolls' editor as well as the change of leadership in the editing project may once again postpone publication."This whole incident works against what we all say we want -- to see the scrolls published," said Eugene Ulrich, a professor at Notre Dame University in South Bend, Ind., and one of the three new editors heading the publication project.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2003
PHILADELPHIA - Preventing power outages and keeping the nation's electric system running efficiently in a newly competitive market will require a clearer set of rules and more centralized, regional monitoring of the way electricity is transmitted, system operators and regulators said yesterday during an industry summit in Philadelphia. The Aug. 14 blackout that cut power to 50 million people in the United States and Canada added a sense of urgency to the annual gathering of key energy players in the mid -Atlantic region, who met to sort out the problems of a once heavily regulated industry going through restructuring.
NEWS
By Irving Pressley McPhail | July 15, 2003
AS I CLOSELY followed the affirmative action debates regarding the University of Michigan's admissions policies, I knew that the Supreme Court's ruling would have a profound effect on higher education and its commitment to embracing diversity. As an African-American who attended three Ivy League universities in the late 1960s and 1970s, when diversity was just beginning to be a priority, I celebrate the court's ruling knowing that today's classrooms will continue to have a true opportunity to reflect our global society.
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