Advertisement
HomeCollectionsOpen A Restaurant
IN THE NEWS

Open A Restaurant

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By JOURNAL OF MARTINSBURG | October 5, 1997
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - In March 1977, Erwin and Carol Asam sold their home in Washington, D.C., along with their restaurant and packed their belongings in the family's station wagon to open a restaurant in Shepherdstown.Erwin Asam, a native of Munich, Germany, located in the region of Bavaria, named the restaurant the Bavarian Inn.Asam, 58, said when he and his wife purchased the inn only the living room of the Greystone Mansion was used as a dining room. Asam was the chef, and his wife, Carol, was the hostess when they first opened.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Guy Fieri is coming to Baltimore. Horseshoe Casino Baltimore announced on Thursday that the flamboyant tattooed culinary personality will open a restaurant at the casino currently under construction on Russell Street. Guy Fieri's Baltimore Kitchen & Bar will be open daily for breakfast, lunch, dinner and late-night dining. The 350-seat restaurant will offer casual foods, including an extensive variety of burgers, wings, small bites and shareable food items.  The restaurant will feature an outdoor patio and dining area.  Click here for video of Fieri talking about Baltimore, and Baltimore's pit beef obsession.
Advertisement
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 25, 2001
Visitors to Centre Park Drive in Columbia may soon be able to dine again in the space where the Tavern at Centre Park once was. Greg Carey, vice president of JPB Enterprises, which owns the building at 8808 Centre Park Drive, said yesterday that the company expects to have a new occupant sign a lease to occupy the space within a month or two and open a restaurant. The tavern will not be coming back, however. The old restaurant, which also was owned by portfolio holding company JPB, was closed in January after executives decided to divest themselves of their restaurant ventures.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2011
Night after night, touring the country for his one-man show, Chazz Palminteri searched for the perfect Italian meal, but 31 plates of linguine marinara gave way to 31 disappointments. Then, he walked into Aldo's , a mainstay of Baltimore's Little Italy, and found not only the pasta he'd been craving but the collaborators for his dream project. Two years later, and the Academy Award nominee is about to add a restaurant to a resume that includes "The Usual Suspects," "Bullets Over Broadway" and "A Bronx Tale," the 1989 one-man show that brought him fame, not to mention a lifelong friend and mentor in Robert De Niro.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1996
Annapolis residents and business owners will have one more chance tonight to give McDonald's golden arches the boot.The city council will hold a public hearing in City Hall concerning two applications from McDonald's Corp. to open a restaurant in the historic first block of West St. and a second restaurant in Eastport.While city officials say McDonald's will help give an economic boost to the ailing Inner West Street corridor, business owners and neighbors have loudly voiced objections to the proposed restaurant since the application was filed in February.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | August 8, 1996
Several Baltimore eating places made it into September's Bon Appetit, a special issue devoted to the American restaurant.In "Chefs' Night Out," Peter Zimmer of Joy America Cafe tells where he goes to eat when he's not cooking. His favorites: Lexington Market; Purim Oak, a small Asian restaurant in Towson that Bon Appetit calls "Premium Oak"; and the pizza chain Bertucci's, a favorite of Zimmer's kids.The Wharf Rat near Camden Yards is prominent in another story, on the brew-pub craze sweeping the country.
NEWS
By Charles Salter Jr | February 20, 1997
It is one of those fantasies that sounds utterly creative, fulfilling and fun, in other words everything your present career isn't shaping up to be. The fantasy? Opening your own restaurant.Sure, it's crazy, but after cooking the best meal of your life, or better yet, the morning after throwing a splendid dinner party, you imagine it could happen some day. You're Rick in "Casablanca," running the most popular night spot in town. Or Sam Malone on "Cheers," hanging out behind the bar with your buddies.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1996
Ronald McDonald can take his golden arches elsewhere as far as downtown Annapolis business owners are concerned.The McDonald's chain's permit application for a restaurant in the first block of West St., filed in February, has stirred protests from owners of nearby businesses, who worry that a fast-food restaurant wouldn't fit in the neighborhood of upscale small businesses and art galleries they are trying to develop."
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1997
Bucking Columbia's trend toward chain restaurants, two independently owned eating places -- Sonoma's Bar and Grille and Columbia Crab House and Raw Bar -- have opened in Owen Brown village in the past few months.Sonoma's, which serves seafood, salads and Southwestern-style dishes, opened in the village center about three weeks ago and had its grand opening Friday, said Steve Heintzelman, owner and operator.The 15-employee restaurant is in the space formerly occupied by Cover to Cover bookstore and cafe that was renovated during the past several months, Heintzelman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | November 16, 1995
Thai-ChiPaul Chot, a native of Thailand, wanted to open a restaurant that specialized in both Thai and Chinese cuisines. He brought his Thai chef, Sam Ho, from Malaysia. His Chinese chef, Hong Lee, last worked at Joey Chui's Greenspring Inn. He had designer Rebeka Gurfinchel, known for her interiors at the Greenspring Inn and Liberatore, create a stylish dining room. The result is the newly opened Thai Orient in the Valley Centre in Owings Mills. Specialties include such dishes as fresh fish in lime sauce, shrimp in roasted chili sauce, Szechuan crispy chicken and Panang beef.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2010
Frank J. Tamberino, a neighborhood pharmacist who won the confidence of the customers who referred to him as "doctor," died of kidney failure Friday at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Fallston resident was 72. Born in Baltimore and raised on East Eager Street, he began work as an 8-year-old, selling fruit and vegetables alongside his father on a produce truck. Mr. Tamberino attended St. James the Less School and was a drum major in its marching corps. He was a 1957 City College graduate and worked behind the soda fountain at the old Lake Pharmacy on Harford Road in Mayfield.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | September 3, 2008
From the way eating places are opening up along Harford Road in the Hamilton/Lauraville neighborhoods, you would think every chef in the region had moved to the area and decided to open a restaurant or tavern there. This section of Harford has become a restaurant row to rival any in Baltimore, with Clementine (new this spring), Chameleon Cafe, Big Bad Wolf's House of Barbeque, the Alabama BBQ Company, Koco's Pub and Zeke's Coffee being among the best at what they do in the city. "It's a convergence of several things," says Lorrie Schoettler, executive director of the Neighborhoods of Lauraville.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | December 31, 2006
A lot happened on the local restaurant scene this year, but the biggest trend wasn't a happy one. Let's call it entree creep. At the beginning of the year I was still talking about places trying to keep their main courses under that magic $20 figure so they would be considered moderate. That now seems long ago and far away. Consider yourself lucky if the entrees on a restaurant's menu are priced under $30. Of course, there are exceptions; but when a bar in Fells Point has entrees starting at $19.95 and ending at $28.95 (I'm thinking of the last restaurant I went to, John Steven Ltd.)
BUSINESS
By ANDREA K. WALKER and ANDREA K. WALKER,SUN REPORTER | October 14, 2005
The crab cake company that found stardom on the QVC cable television shopping channel now hopes to find similar success in the restaurant business. Chesapeake Bay Gourmet, the 25-year-old Rosedale company that became a household name after debuting on QVC a decade ago, opened its first restaurant, Chesapeake Bay Crab Cakes & More, last week in Hunt Valley. In opening the restaurant, the first in what it hopes to become a chain, the company is entering a highly competitive market that includes large franchises such as Phillips Seafood Restaurants and dozens of mom-and-pop operations such as Obrycki's in Fells Point.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and By Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | July 10, 2005
Arcos is unusual for a restaurant because the food seems to be something of an afterthought. Luckily, it's a good afterthought. When Nicolas Ramos, a Mexican native who is in the construction business, decided to open a restaurant in Upper Fells Point, its looks -- of course -- were important to him. He did the renovation himself, predominantly out of recycled materials from places being torn down in the area, like doors from the Munsey Building and...
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2005
Oakland Mills Village Center has another opportunity to fill an empty building, a key piece to its rejuvenation. A liquor license application submitted this week by a prospective restaurant operator moves the village center a step closer to filling the void left by the closing of Last Chance Saloon, a 23-year-old neighborhood pub and restaurant. Vaughn Ennis, one of the three partners in the venture, said the establishment would be "a standard American family restaurant," serving a variety of dishes, including seafood.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1996
When McDonald's Corp. wanted to bring its famous burgers and fries to historic Annapolis five months ago, area business owners and residents objected loudly and vowed to fight the proposal every step of the way.But those voices of protest were curiously absent last night as McDonald's made its pitch to the City Council, presenting its application to open an express restaurant in the historic first block of West St."There is no use protesting any more," said Tony Cipriano, as he closed his restaurant, Tony's Pizza-n-Pasta, for the night.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2005
Oakland Mills Village Center has another opportunity to fill an empty building, a key piece to its rejuvenation. A liquor license application submitted this week by a prospective restaurant operator moves the village center a step closer to filling the void left by the closing of Last Chance Saloon, a 23-year-old neighborhood pub and restaurant. Vaughn Ennis, one of the three partners in the venture, said the establishment would be "a standard American family restaurant," serving a variety of dishes, including seafood.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2005
As a teenager, Ray Lewis would occasionally enter his mother's tiny fast-food establishment in Memphis, Tenn., and vow that one day he would not only play professional football but own a restaurant larger than hers. Sometimes, after having flipped burgers for hours, Sunseria Smith made it clear to her son that she was in no mood for what she considered ham. "Boy, get out my face," she would scold. "You don't know what you're talking about." But he did know. Yesterday, Smith stood inside the Ravens linebacker's first entrepreneurial venture: Ray Lewis' Full Moon Bar-B-Que, a posh, 6,200-square-foot restaurant that represents a two-year, $2 million investment of which Lewis is the majority shareholder.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 30, 2004
It takes a lot of guts to open a restaurant. Owners choose a location, fine-tune their recipes, hone their wine lists and tinker with their interiors. Then they hire staff, open their doors and hope for the best. You've probably heard that 90 percent of restaurants go out of business before they are a year old. Several studies have found that the number is closer to 30 percent the first year, with 60 percent of restaurants closing before they reach their third anniversary. Here are some of the new Baltimore-area restaurants reviewed this year that seem likely to beat the odds.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.