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BUSINESS
By Mara H. Gottfried and Mara H. Gottfried,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 22, 2000
Sitel Corp. saw its shares rise more than 20 percent yesterday after the Baltimore-based company said it had signed a contract to handle customer contacts for General Motors Corp.'s OnStar system. Sitel will service the OnStar account from a 750-person workstation it will build in Charlotte, N.C. Sitel provides telephone and Internet-based customer service support in more than 75 customer contact centers worldwide. OnStar, a subsidiary of General Motors, operates an in-vehicle safety, security and information system that links drivers to OnStar operators.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
About one in five cars on American roadways connects to outside parties via cellular telephone networks, transmitting data on drivers' speeding and braking habits, their location, and their vehicle's health and performance. By 2025, AAA predicts, all new cars will. Computers on board most vehicles on the road already collect and monitor such data, which can be downloaded at dealerships for repair purposes and shared with manufacturers, who say it's used to make cars safer and more reliable.
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BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2000
In one of the most striking examples of just how thoroughly the communications revolution is changing American business, General Motors Corp. has struck a deal with Bell Atlantic Mobile to put hands-free telephones in millions of GM cars, with onboard Internet access to follow. That's right, General Motors -- the quintessential 20th century industrial behemoth -- is a paid-in-full member of the new, wired economy. The company that produced the Cadillac and the Corvette is set to become one of the nation's largest resellers of cellular telephone service, offering the technology beginning in the middle of the year.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 23, 2000
WASHINGTON - For years, insurance companies have priced auto policies according to the risk factors that they can easily measure: the age, sex and marital status of the driver, the type of car and the owner's neighborhood. But technology has added to the list: Companies can now tell how many hours the car is operated, at what times of day and on what kinds of roads. The change has made auto insurance far more interesting for two groups of people who never had a particular concern for the subject: environmentalists and privacy advocates.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2000
Need help with a breakdown? Can't find your motel? Want to book a flight for next weekend? If you're driving one of 29 General Motors models with the OnStar cellular communication and satellite tracking system, you're in luck. Popularized by commercials featuring Batman in an OnStar-enabled Batmobile, the system is both a lifeline and a concierge on the road. Standard equipment on fancier cars and a $695 option (plus a yearly fee) on others, Onstar uses an embedded Global Positioning System receiver and a 3-watt, hands-free cellular telephone to put you in touch with a 24-hour staff of advisors in Troy, Mich.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 11, 1999
DETROIT -- General Motors Corp. said yesterday that it will unite its online car-buying Web site and onboard information services under a new unit to exploit the Internet and build revenue beyond car sales.Sun Microsystems Inc. will link and improve GM's Web sites for the new business, called e-GM, and develop a voice-activated Internet system. About 25 percent of U.S. auto revenue may eventually come from onboard services such as GM's OnStar rather than selling and fixing cars, said Sun Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Scott McNealy.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2000
As more cars drive onto the road of high-tech, a company that is hoping to be serious competition for OnStar is emerging here in Howard County. Response Services Center LLC, a subsidiary of AAA Inc., monitors car-tracking devices to help drivers in need of emergency assistance and to prevent auto theft. The company opened a call center in Columbia last month that is expected to employ about 500. Initial service offerings are expected during the first quarter of next year. "As we move into 2001, we will have the most advanced telematics call center in the country," said Dan Dickerson, the company's chief executive officer.
NEWS
By Andrew J. Glass | June 3, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In and around New York City, a syndicate of 15 government transportation agencies will earn about $325 million this year from a highly popular computerized toll-collection system called E-ZPass.The system sends out a radio signal that recognizes each subscriber by reading a tiny tag mounted on the driver's windshield. A computer then debits the toll from a prepaid account. E-ZPass users often zip through toll plazas as unequipped vehicles creep toward clogged cash lanes.Without any fanfare, antennas have been installed along some highways that feed these toll plazas, creating an ability to track the speed and location of E-ZPass holders.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 23, 2000
WASHINGTON - For years, insurance companies have priced auto policies according to the risk factors that they can easily measure: the age, sex and marital status of the driver, the type of car and the owner's neighborhood. But technology has added to the list: Companies can now tell how many hours the car is operated, at what times of day and on what kinds of roads. The change has made auto insurance far more interesting for two groups of people who never had a particular concern for the subject: environmentalists and privacy advocates.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
About one in five cars on American roadways connects to outside parties via cellular telephone networks, transmitting data on drivers' speeding and braking habits, their location, and their vehicle's health and performance. By 2025, AAA predicts, all new cars will. Computers on board most vehicles on the road already collect and monitor such data, which can be downloaded at dealerships for repair purposes and shared with manufacturers, who say it's used to make cars safer and more reliable.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2000
Need help with a breakdown? Can't find your motel? Want to book a flight for next weekend? If you're driving one of 29 General Motors models with the OnStar cellular communication and satellite tracking system, you're in luck. Popularized by commercials featuring Batman in an OnStar-enabled Batmobile, the system is both a lifeline and a concierge on the road. Standard equipment on fancier cars and a $695 option (plus a yearly fee) on others, Onstar uses an embedded Global Positioning System receiver and a 3-watt, hands-free cellular telephone to put you in touch with a 24-hour staff of advisors in Troy, Mich.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2000
As more cars drive onto the road of high-tech, a company that is hoping to be serious competition for OnStar is emerging here in Howard County. Response Services Center LLC, a subsidiary of AAA Inc., monitors car-tracking devices to help drivers in need of emergency assistance and to prevent auto theft. The company opened a call center in Columbia last month that is expected to employ about 500. Initial service offerings are expected during the first quarter of next year. "As we move into 2001, we will have the most advanced telematics call center in the country," said Dan Dickerson, the company's chief executive officer.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2000
In one of the most striking examples of just how thoroughly the communications revolution is changing American business, General Motors Corp. has struck a deal with Bell Atlantic Mobile to put hands-free telephones in millions of GM cars, with onboard Internet access to follow. That's right, General Motors -- the quintessential 20th century industrial behemoth -- is a paid-in-full member of the new, wired economy. The company that produced the Cadillac and the Corvette is set to become one of the nation's largest resellers of cellular telephone service, offering the technology beginning in the middle of the year.
BUSINESS
By Mara H. Gottfried and Mara H. Gottfried,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 22, 2000
Sitel Corp. saw its shares rise more than 20 percent yesterday after the Baltimore-based company said it had signed a contract to handle customer contacts for General Motors Corp.'s OnStar system. Sitel will service the OnStar account from a 750-person workstation it will build in Charlotte, N.C. Sitel provides telephone and Internet-based customer service support in more than 75 customer contact centers worldwide. OnStar, a subsidiary of General Motors, operates an in-vehicle safety, security and information system that links drivers to OnStar operators.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 11, 1999
DETROIT -- General Motors Corp. said yesterday that it will unite its online car-buying Web site and onboard information services under a new unit to exploit the Internet and build revenue beyond car sales.Sun Microsystems Inc. will link and improve GM's Web sites for the new business, called e-GM, and develop a voice-activated Internet system. About 25 percent of U.S. auto revenue may eventually come from onboard services such as GM's OnStar rather than selling and fixing cars, said Sun Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Scott McNealy.
NEWS
By Andrew J. Glass | June 3, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In and around New York City, a syndicate of 15 government transportation agencies will earn about $325 million this year from a highly popular computerized toll-collection system called E-ZPass.The system sends out a radio signal that recognizes each subscriber by reading a tiny tag mounted on the driver's windshield. A computer then debits the toll from a prepaid account. E-ZPass users often zip through toll plazas as unequipped vehicles creep toward clogged cash lanes.Without any fanfare, antennas have been installed along some highways that feed these toll plazas, creating an ability to track the speed and location of E-ZPass holders.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 1, 2000
DEARBORN, Mich. - Ford Motor Co. and Qualcomm Inc. plan to form a joint venture to provide wireless Internet access and emergency call service in cars starting late next year. The venture, called Wingcast, will be led by former Microsoft Corp. Vice President Harel Kodesh, who will hold the titles of president and chief executive. Ford Vice Chairman Wayne Booker will be chairman of the venture. Ford, the world's second-largest automaker, is attempting to catch up to rival General Motors Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jeff Gelles and Jeff Gelles,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 23, 2001
The jury remains out on the question of just how risky it is to talk on a cell phone while driving. Nor is it clear whether the risk is reduced if you don't have to pick up the phone, dial a number or hold the handset to your ear. But now that New York state has passed a law barring drivers from talking on handheld cell phones, and with the prospect of similar laws at the local, state and national levels, it might be time for inveterate car-talkers to...
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