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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2002
There were times, Yoko Ono remembers, when John Lennon and their toddler son, Sean, would gather around the kitchen table armed with pens and paper. "John would be saying, `What's this going to be?' and Sean would say, `That's gonna be a duckie!' and John would draw a duck," Ono said in a phone interview from her Manhattan apartment. "They would have a great dialogue over it - I think John was proud that he was a great father doing that," the 69-year-old, soft-spoken Ono said. "He had a big heart, and he had an incredible sense of humor.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 1, 2006
Since partners such as Paul McCartney and Yoko Ono sparked John Lennon's creative breakthroughs, it's fitting that two people - veteran documentary-makers David Leaf and John Scheinfeld - wrote, produced and directed The U.S. vs. John Lennon. This alternately engaging and incendiary film, now playing at the Charles, gives equal weight to both its subjects: what was happening in the U.S. and in the life and work of John Lennon between 1966 and 1976. Leaf and Scheinfeld have come up with the fullest screen portrait yet of Lennon as a maturing pop thinker who drew on ruthless self-analysis as well as sharp perception when he created anthems like "Give Peace a Chance."
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 29, 1996
Most Beatle fans know that John Lennon first met Yoko Ono at a London art gallery in 1966, where he saw and was impressed by her work. Not quite so well known is the tale of how Ono first came into contact with Lennon's artwork."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 29, 2006
The U.S. vs. John Lennon details the tumult of American society and the changes in Beatle John Lennon from 1966 to 1976, when he roamed beyond his current and then former bandmates and settled in New York City with his second wife, performance artist Yoko Ono. As Lennon and Ono channeled their artistic energies into social protest, J. Edgar Hoover's FBI began monitoring them. At the behest of the Nixon administration and conservatives like Sen. Strom Thurmond of South Carolina, the government served them deportation orders in 1972, on the grounds that four years before Lennon had pleaded guilty to a British drug charge of possessing marijuana.
FEATURES
By PAUL ADAMS and PAUL ADAMS,SUN REPORTER | October 3, 2005
They put up with long hours, endless demands from an exacting boss and teasing from their jealous co-workers, who nicknamed them "geisha boys." Then, when it was all finally coming to end, the four men assigned to work for Setsuko Ono did something that presumably few if any, ironworkers had ever done inside the pallid, steel walls of the machine shop at Sparrows Point. They ate sushi. A more unlikely group has rarely ever assembled for a lunch of raw fish. The boss is a retired World Bank executive turned author and sculptor, the youngest child of an aristocratic Japanese family that produced prominent bankers and artists, the most famous being her sister, Yoko, whose marriage to John Lennon placed her in the sorority of female pop-culture icons.
FEATURES
March 20, 2006
March 20 1852: Harriet Beecher Stowe's influential novel about slavery, Uncle Tom's Cabin, was first published. 1969: John Lennon married Yoko Ono in Gibraltar. 1976: Newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst was convicted of armed robbery for her part in a San Francisco bank holdup.
NEWS
By CHIAKI KAWAJIRI and CHIAKI KAWAJIRI,SUN REPORTER | October 9, 2005
When a worker at the ISG Sparrows Point steel plant told me about a Japanese artist who was making sculptures there with the help of ironworkers, I was intrigued by the possibility of a rich visual story. Here was an opportunity to go back to the steel mills, which I found hauntingly beautiful, and also to find out how a fellow Japanese was making her way in the United States. When I visited the light fabrication shop, I was greeted by huge sculptures that seemed to come to life, dancing to the pounding and banging of the steelworkers.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 29, 2006
The U.S. vs. John Lennon details the tumult of American society and the changes in Beatle John Lennon from 1966 to 1976, when he roamed beyond his current and then former bandmates and settled in New York City with his second wife, performance artist Yoko Ono. As Lennon and Ono channeled their artistic energies into social protest, J. Edgar Hoover's FBI began monitoring them. At the behest of the Nixon administration and conservatives like Sen. Strom Thurmond of South Carolina, the government served them deportation orders in 1972, on the grounds that four years before Lennon had pleaded guilty to a British drug charge of possessing marijuana.
NEWS
February 19, 1993
HERE'S a shocker for baby boomers: Yoko Ono turned 60 yesterday.Yoko 60? Her husband, the late John Lennon, remains frozen in (( our memories at a younger age, killed by a crazy gunman at 40. For the most part, Ms. Ono has stayed out of the public eye since that awful December night in 1980. Even though many Beatles fans regarded her as the older woman who stole John's heart and triggered the break-up of the group, Ms. Ono was always a much more complicated figure than that.A Baltimore man recalled spending another of her birthdays in the company of the famous couple.
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | October 16, 1991
NEW YORK -- Tony Monero, a Brooklyn singer/dancer who says he inspired the story of his namesake in the hit movie "Saturday Night Fever," claims he had a PG-rated sexual encounter with John Lennon.Eliot Mintz, spokesman for Lennon's widow, Yoko Ono, declined comment.Monero ran into Lennon outside Jimmy Day's bar in Greenwich Village one morning in May 1974, during Lennon's 18-month separation from Ono."John and Harry Nilsson had been up all night," says Monero, who introduced himself as a fan and was invited by Lennon for a drink.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | September 24, 2006
A year-old collection of steel men, women and sea creatures will be yanked out of the Inner Harbor next month to make room for another sculpture in a rotating McKeldin Square exhibit. That is, unless the women can't wait and hightail it out of there on their own. It's been a long year for six sculptures created by the unlikely alliance of Yoko Ono's sister and Sparrows Point steelworkers. Long for the women in the sculpture anyway. Somebody keeps bending the female figures - and just the females.
FEATURES
March 20, 2006
March 20 1852: Harriet Beecher Stowe's influential novel about slavery, Uncle Tom's Cabin, was first published. 1969: John Lennon married Yoko Ono in Gibraltar. 1976: Newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst was convicted of armed robbery for her part in a San Francisco bank holdup.
NEWS
By CHIAKI KAWAJIRI and CHIAKI KAWAJIRI,SUN REPORTER | October 9, 2005
When a worker at the ISG Sparrows Point steel plant told me about a Japanese artist who was making sculptures there with the help of ironworkers, I was intrigued by the possibility of a rich visual story. Here was an opportunity to go back to the steel mills, which I found hauntingly beautiful, and also to find out how a fellow Japanese was making her way in the United States. When I visited the light fabrication shop, I was greeted by huge sculptures that seemed to come to life, dancing to the pounding and banging of the steelworkers.
NEWS
October 3, 2005
NATIONAL Factions lobby Bush on pick A wide range of forces - from conservative activists to Hispanics to his wife - are vying to influence President Bush's choice of a Supreme Court nominee, a decision that could be announced as early as today. pg 1a At least 21 die as boat capsizes At least 21 people died when a tour boat carrying senior citizens on New York's Lake George suddenly capsized in calm, clear weather. pg 3a WORLD Security forces, Hamas clash As Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas and Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon agreed to hold a summit meeting soon, Palestinian security forces and Hamas militants engaged in deadly clashes.
FEATURES
By PAUL ADAMS and PAUL ADAMS,SUN REPORTER | October 3, 2005
They put up with long hours, endless demands from an exacting boss and teasing from their jealous co-workers, who nicknamed them "geisha boys." Then, when it was all finally coming to end, the four men assigned to work for Setsuko Ono did something that presumably few if any, ironworkers had ever done inside the pallid, steel walls of the machine shop at Sparrows Point. They ate sushi. A more unlikely group has rarely ever assembled for a lunch of raw fish. The boss is a retired World Bank executive turned author and sculptor, the youngest child of an aristocratic Japanese family that produced prominent bankers and artists, the most famous being her sister, Yoko, whose marriage to John Lennon placed her in the sorority of female pop-culture icons.
NEWS
April 20, 2004
Ono H. Lescure, a homemaker and former Ruxton resident, died Friday of complications from a stroke at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. She had celebrated her 100th birthday in July. She was born Ono Healy and raised in Washington, D.C. She worked briefly for the Times Herald newspaper in Washington before her 1920 marriage to John M. Lescure Sr. Her husband, a former president of Western Maryland Dairy and general manager for the Sealtest division of National Dairy Products Corp.
FEATURES
By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 17, 2002
Clark & Lewis? Costello & Abbott? Hammerstein & Rodgers? How about McCartney & Lennon? Messing with the name of a famous partnership can be jarring to the ear, like some semantic pothole on memory lane or, worse, an ungraceful recalculation of history. That's why a number of Beatles lovers are asking Paul McCartney why, when it comes to the band's storied songbook, he can't just let it be. The concert album by McCartney that hit the charts this month, Back in the U.S., lists 19 Beatles songs written by "Paul McCartney and John Lennon," a transposition of the classic "Lennon-McCartney" signature line that is instantly recognizable across generations of music fans.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | September 24, 2006
A year-old collection of steel men, women and sea creatures will be yanked out of the Inner Harbor next month to make room for another sculpture in a rotating McKeldin Square exhibit. That is, unless the women can't wait and hightail it out of there on their own. It's been a long year for six sculptures created by the unlikely alliance of Yoko Ono's sister and Sparrows Point steelworkers. Long for the women in the sculpture anyway. Somebody keeps bending the female figures - and just the females.
NEWS
April 19, 2004
On April 16, 2004, ONO H. LESCURE; beloved wife of the late John M. Lescure, Sr.; devoted mother of John M. Lescure, Jr. of Kennebunkport, ME and the late Ono L. Lescure; loving grandmother of Jamie Lescure Ault of Wayne, ME, Paige E. Lescure of Annapolis, MD and John M. Lescure, III of Kennebunk, ME. Also survived by great-grandchildren Alla, Sophie, John and Olivia. A Memorial Service will be held at the Church of the Good Shepherd, 1401 Carrollton Avenue, Ruxton on Tuesday, April 20 at 3:00 P.M. Reception to follow.
FEATURES
By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 17, 2002
Clark & Lewis? Costello & Abbott? Hammerstein & Rodgers? How about McCartney & Lennon? Messing with the name of a famous partnership can be jarring to the ear, like some semantic pothole on memory lane or, worse, an ungraceful recalculation of history. That's why a number of Beatles lovers are asking Paul McCartney why, when it comes to the band's storied songbook, he can't just let it be. The concert album by McCartney that hit the charts this month, Back in the U.S., lists 19 Beatles songs written by "Paul McCartney and John Lennon," a transposition of the classic "Lennon-McCartney" signature line that is instantly recognizable across generations of music fans.
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