Advertisement
HomeCollectionsOnline
IN THE NEWS

Online

NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | December 4, 2013
The most important website last weekend and in weeks to come -- on which the hopes and fears of countless Americans are focused (and the president's poll ratings depend) -- is not HealthCare.gov. It's Amazon.com. Even if and when HealthCare.gov works perfectly, relatively few Americans will be affected by it. Only 5 percent of us are in the private health-insurance market to begin with. But almost half of Americans are now shopping for great holiday deals online, and many will be profoundly affected -- not because they get great deals, but because their jobs and incomes are at stake.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Graham Dodge | December 2, 2013
In 1998, I had a start-up called NotFilms.com that provided an online platform for home videos.  At that time, online video was the size of a matchbook and very few people had a broadband connection capable of uploading video (let alone watching it), so users sent us their VHS tapes and DVDs via snail mail for us to digitize/encode it in glorious Quicktime, RealPlayer and Windows Media Player formats.  This was obviously a barrier to entry, and the start-up failed along with numerous others during that early dot-com era.  It wasn't until broadband was more widely adopted that a little website called YouTube was then able to succeed at what we had attempted seven years prior.  Broadband has since enabled the success of many streaming video sites and apps.  Its importance cannot be overstated, but today broadband is mostly taken for granted, and may seem less obvious to some in its enabling of other technologies.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
For the first time this spring, students who want to take a class at the University of Baltimore with a Pulitzer Prize-winning civil rights historian won't be bound by the university they chose to attend. The class, taught by local author Taylor Branch, is the University System of Maryland's first crack at offering an online, credit course for students from any of the system's 14 institutions, including Coppin, Towson and the University of Maryland, College Park. They will be able to communicate and interact in real time with classmates and with Branch, best known for writing the trilogy "America in the King Years.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Still have questions about how and when to see Comet ISON? Editors from Astronomy and Discover magazines will answer them online Thursday. The magazines are hosting a Google Hangout chat from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., with editors and other experts answering questions. They will discuss questions including where and when to see the comet, how you can photograph it, and what scientists might learn from it. RSVP for the event or simply tune in at 3 p.m. The magazines, in partnership with the National Science Foundation, are meanwhile holding a Comet ISON photo contest with three top $2,500 prizes.
NEWS
By Jon S. Cardin | November 20, 2013
In 2010, When Annmarie Chiarini's ex-boyfriend posted 88 naked pictures of her on a website designed to shame, humiliate and destroy lives, she went straight to the police. Certain her ex committed a crime, she was shocked when the officers smirked sheepishly at the thought of this young woman's naked pictures on the Internet while informing her no law had been broken. Meanwhile, Ms. Chiarini's job at a local college, her reputation as a responsible, upstanding citizen, her relationships with her children, family and friends and her mental stability hung precariously in the balance.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun and By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
As they rushed toward a suburban Utah home with guns drawn, agents knew they were on to a significant figure in the  Silk   Road  online drug bazaar -- a major cocaine dealer, perhaps.  Message boards on  Silk   Road  -- the world's most popular online drug market -- had been buzzing about the sale that triggered this bust. Users of the encrypted website advertised drugs, forged documents and hacking tools for sale through seemingly anonymous transactions, but a kilo of pure Peruvian cocaine was something special.  Federal authorities in Baltimore had been working for a year to breach the inner circle of  Silk   Road's  kingpin, whom they knew only by the alias Dread Pirate Roberts.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
Scientists have plenty of questions about a bizarre asteroid spotted spouting what looks like six comet-like tails, but they are nevertheless giving the public an opportunity to make their own queries about it. Researchers are holding a Google Hangout on Thursday to talk about the discovery, including how and when the asteroid was discovered, what its six tails are made of, and how common such asteroids are in space. The Baltimore-based Space Telescope Science Institute and NASA released images of the asteroid last Thursday . It was found by astronomers observing the solar system's asteroid belt using the Hubble Space Telescope.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2013
Netflix changed the way people rent movies. Amazon upended the big-box bookstore. Other online retailers grabbed market share in niches as diverse as contact lenses and pet medications. Why not razors? That's the question posed by a Catonsville firm - along with about half a dozen other online upstarts. They're trying to make inroads in a market dominated by Gillette and still largely driven by sales in supermarkets and other brick-and-mortar stores. 800razors.com, the new local competitor, is the brainchild of serial entrepreneurs Philip Masiello and Steven Krane.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Former Senator Theatre owner Tom Kiefaber is accusing state Sen. Joan Carter Conway of assault after an incident last week that ended with him in handcuffs at the auction of his former home. Kiefaber recorded a confrontation with the Baltimore lawmaker and posted it to YouTube. The video shows him walking outside the Orkney Road house and approaching Conway, who pushes the camera away before walking off with two men. "I told him: 'You can keep that camera out of my face,'" Conway said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.