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By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
The Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant restarted its reactor that automatically shut down last week after a malfunction at the Southern Maryland facility. Operator Exelon Corp. said Monday that the Unit 1 reactor returned to full power at 9 a.m. Sunday. The facility's second reactor continued to run during the outage, one of three incidents in the last eight months in which one or both of the units had unplanned shutdowns. The malfunction that caused Unit 1 to power down Thursday morning happened during electrical breaker testing, Exelon said.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
Want to see what gifts Baltimore's elected officials and government workers have received? You can check out the details online, but you first have to make a stop at City Hall to sign up. The city's Ethics Board says it is not allowed to make the process totally digital because of a requirement, based on a state law, that individuals show up once in person, show identification and fill out a contact form. The city is among the first local governments to provide online access to the records, which also include disclosure of certain loans, family income sources and business relationships.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
More than 2,000 Social Security numbers of former Johns Hopkins University graduate students were exposed to potential hackers, the university confirmed Saturday. Hopkins officials discovered on March 19 that the names and Social Security numbers of 2,166 former students were stored on a server that was accessible to the Internet, said Dennis O'Shea, a university spokesman. "Somebody had stashed them on a machine, not realizing that when they did that, the files would be accessible on the Internet," O'Shea said.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
Property owners could be able to apply for most city tax credits through an online system by the end of the year, a set-up designed to improve the accuracy of a process that has been troubled by errors, officials said Friday. The online system went live Friday for developers of large apartment buildings, said William Voorhees, the city's director of revenue and tax analysis. He said he expects it to open to applications for the historic properties tax credit this summer and most others by the end of the year.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
The future of a system that would let voters download absentee ballots before mailing them in was cast into doubt Thursday when the State Board of Elections refused to move forward with part of the plan amid fears it would open the door to widespread fraud. The five-member panel declined to certify a system for marking the ballots on a computer screen despite assurances from its staff that the system was secure and ready to be used in this year's June primary and November general elections.
NEWS
April 21, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's announcement last week that Baltimore would put public officials' financial disclosure statements online was both a welcome step forward and a sign of just how far Maryland has to go to be truly transparent. The city's forms - which include things such as officials' outside employment, real estate holdings and investments - may soon be available on the web, but those who want to look at them will first have to go to City Hall, verify their identity and register for access.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
For the first time, financial disclosure forms for nearly 1,900 Baltimore government officials will be online for public inspection, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced Monday. Individuals will be able to search online for loans, family income sources, gifts and business relationships for government workers and elected officials. The change eliminates the need to travel to City Hall to pull documents, though residents will not be able to use the system until they set up an account in person.
NEWS
By Katie V. Jones, Baltimore Sun Media Group | April 11, 2014
Instead of hopping into the car for those short trips to the mall, the park or classes, residents are being asked by county government and the Columbia Association to consider an alternative that could benefit not only the user but the environment: bicycle sharing. Last week, the CA and the county announced a partnership for a Bike Share Feasibility Study and are seeking input not only on the idea but also where it might be the most effective. "This is an opportunity to use existing infrastructure, improve our community's health and expand our transportation options," said Jane Dembner, director of community building and open spaceĀ for the Columbia Association who frequently bikes to work.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
The educators at Marley Elementary School near Glen Burnie are a little worried about what may happen when their students receive the next generation of tests. These new assessments have been billed as more challenging, but a room of fourth-graders practicing the test on computers Thursday morning seemed unfazed. "The questions were more simple," said Elena Waller, 9, who will be one of the 65,000 students across the state to take a field test of the new PARCC assessments next week.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | March 13, 2014
Baltimore County Code Enforcement unveiled a new mobile system Thursday that will allow citizens to register and track neighborhood nuisance issues such as overgrown lawns, uncovered garbage and rats online. "This is a $1.13 million platform that automates code enforcement process, inspections and enforcement efforts," County Executive Kevin Kamenetz told a gathering of members of the press and community leaders at the Historic Courthouse in Towson Thursday. "You'll be able to electronically report and track code enforcement notices countywide.
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