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BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | May 29, 2011
Politicians are trying to legalize online poker. Prosecutors are trying to shut it down. Neither is succeeding. Last week's government seizure of 10 gambling sites following indictments by a federal grand jury in Baltimore is another loss for the industry and may further stall legislation in Washington and some states to regulate and tax online poker. But don't bet against online betting. The day after the indictments were unsealed, Bodog.com, a popular gambling site that was part of a previous investigation by the Maryland U.S. attorney, changed to a European domain — Bodog.eu — in an apparent attempt to avoid a crackdown by U.S. authorities.
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NEWS
Ron Smith | September 22, 2011
Two of the icons of the poker world, Chris "Jesus" Ferguson and Howard Lederer, and two other directors of the Full Tilt Poker website have been accused of defrauding thousands of online poker players out of some $300 million owed to them. In effect, the federal government is accusing these men of profiting from a Ponzi scheme, run very much like the fractional reserve banking system under which obligations vastly exceed on-hand deposits and couldn't possibly be paid if everybody wanted out at the same time.
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NEWS
By Sam Braids | May 31, 2011
The banishment of U.S. players from the major online poker rooms has affected millions of Americans. With the exception of a few jurisdictions, such as Washington state, it is not illegal for Americans to play online poker. Instead, the Department of Justice contends that according to a bizarre 2006 law, it is illegal for financial institutions to transfer funds between U.S. residents and the foreign companies that offer online poker. In order to prove the obvious, that money was indeed exchanging hands, Homeland Security set up a phony payment processing company in Baltimore to facilitate these transactions so that it could indict the executives of the online poker companies and seize their funds.
NEWS
By Sam Braids | May 31, 2011
The banishment of U.S. players from the major online poker rooms has affected millions of Americans. With the exception of a few jurisdictions, such as Washington state, it is not illegal for Americans to play online poker. Instead, the Department of Justice contends that according to a bizarre 2006 law, it is illegal for financial institutions to transfer funds between U.S. residents and the foreign companies that offer online poker. In order to prove the obvious, that money was indeed exchanging hands, Homeland Security set up a phony payment processing company in Baltimore to facilitate these transactions so that it could indict the executives of the online poker companies and seize their funds.
NEWS
Ron Smith | September 22, 2011
Two of the icons of the poker world, Chris "Jesus" Ferguson and Howard Lederer, and two other directors of the Full Tilt Poker website have been accused of defrauding thousands of online poker players out of some $300 million owed to them. In effect, the federal government is accusing these men of profiting from a Ponzi scheme, run very much like the fractional reserve banking system under which obligations vastly exceed on-hand deposits and couldn't possibly be paid if everybody wanted out at the same time.
BUSINESS
By CAROLYN BIGDA and CAROLYN BIGDA,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | March 12, 2006
Landing a college scholarship always has been, to some degree, a thing of chance. But funding your education by playing Texas Hold `em, a popular form of poker? In the burgeoning online poker industry, a handful of sites now host tournaments for students, offering scholarship prizes worth as much as a year's tuition. The games don't require bets; the more hands you play, the more points you accumulate toward winning. In return, the poker rooms hope to cultivate a loyal base of players who will return to the virtual tables - and play for cash.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | April 5, 2006
Three prominent poker players participated in a Capitol Hill news conference yesterday voicing objections to proposed federal legislation that would ban Internet poker, along with other types of online gambling. Howard Lederer, Chris "Jesus" Ferguson and Greg Raymer, who all have affiliations with online poker Web sites, discussed two anti-Internet gambling bills, particularly one being pushed by Rep. Bob Goodlatte, a Virginia Republican. Goodlatte's bill, which faces a hearing in the House Judiciary Committee today, would expand a federal law that already prohibits sports gambling.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | April 4, 2006
Poker superstars Howard Lederer, Chris "Jesus" Ferguson and Greg Raymer will be gathering today for another high-stakes affair. But instead of betting, bluffing and check-raising each other, the card pros will be voicing their thoughts in Washington about proposed federal legislation that would definitively stamp online poker as illegal. At the moment, online poker and some types of casino-style gambling operate in a legal limbo. While it is clear that online sports gambling is illegal and operators of such sites can be -- and have been -- prosecuted, there is debate over whether the laws that apply to Internet betting on a football game also apply to betting pocket aces.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Diaz and Sam Diaz,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 9, 2004
SAN JOSE, Calif. - For generations, the poker room has been portrayed as a smoke-filled parlor where whiskey-drinking, tobacco-chewing gamblers would rather shoot you than let you take the pot with a pair of fives. But recently, the Internet - and a guy aptly named Chris Moneymaker - brought new life to one of the oldest card games around. Moneymaker, an accountant from Tennessee, qualified for the May 2003 World Series of Poker in Las Vegas - after honing his poker skills on the Internet.
NEWS
By Nicholas Leonhardt | January 30, 2005
WHAT COMMUNITY can oppose a teenage activity that does not involve alcohol, drugs, sex, fast cars or violence? Apparently, quite a few adults object when the pastime is poker. The hobby that stereotypically attracts middle-age men with fat stogies and even fatter beer bellies is now the divertissement of choice for teenage boys. A notoriously fickle lot, young males have helped to make poker games such as Texas Hold 'Em wildly popular. Yet they are dumbfounded by the parental furor over a diversion that reinforces math, improves reasoning skills, involves social interaction and might even be profitable.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | May 29, 2011
Politicians are trying to legalize online poker. Prosecutors are trying to shut it down. Neither is succeeding. Last week's government seizure of 10 gambling sites following indictments by a federal grand jury in Baltimore is another loss for the industry and may further stall legislation in Washington and some states to regulate and tax online poker. But don't bet against online betting. The day after the indictments were unsealed, Bodog.com, a popular gambling site that was part of a previous investigation by the Maryland U.S. attorney, changed to a European domain — Bodog.eu — in an apparent attempt to avoid a crackdown by U.S. authorities.
SPORTS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,Sun Reporter | October 3, 2006
Congress raised the stakes on the online gaming industry over the weekend, and some of the biggest players in the Internet poker business are folding. The Senate tacked anti-online gambling legislation onto a homeland security bill Saturday that would effectively halt much of Internet gaming, including poker, by blocking money transfers from U.S. banks to gambling Web sites and the financial middlemen that service them. PartyGaming - a publicly held company traded on the London Stock Exchange and parent company of PartyPoker, the largest online poker site - has already said it will stop taking U.S. money customers should President Bush sign the bill, which he's expected to do before the November elections.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | April 5, 2006
Three prominent poker players participated in a Capitol Hill news conference yesterday voicing objections to proposed federal legislation that would ban Internet poker, along with other types of online gambling. Howard Lederer, Chris "Jesus" Ferguson and Greg Raymer, who all have affiliations with online poker Web sites, discussed two anti-Internet gambling bills, particularly one being pushed by Rep. Bob Goodlatte, a Virginia Republican. Goodlatte's bill, which faces a hearing in the House Judiciary Committee today, would expand a federal law that already prohibits sports gambling.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | April 4, 2006
Poker superstars Howard Lederer, Chris "Jesus" Ferguson and Greg Raymer will be gathering today for another high-stakes affair. But instead of betting, bluffing and check-raising each other, the card pros will be voicing their thoughts in Washington about proposed federal legislation that would definitively stamp online poker as illegal. At the moment, online poker and some types of casino-style gambling operate in a legal limbo. While it is clear that online sports gambling is illegal and operators of such sites can be -- and have been -- prosecuted, there is debate over whether the laws that apply to Internet betting on a football game also apply to betting pocket aces.
BUSINESS
By CAROLYN BIGDA and CAROLYN BIGDA,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | March 12, 2006
Landing a college scholarship always has been, to some degree, a thing of chance. But funding your education by playing Texas Hold `em, a popular form of poker? In the burgeoning online poker industry, a handful of sites now host tournaments for students, offering scholarship prizes worth as much as a year's tuition. The games don't require bets; the more hands you play, the more points you accumulate toward winning. In return, the poker rooms hope to cultivate a loyal base of players who will return to the virtual tables - and play for cash.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2005
In the world of Texas Hold 'Em, hardcore players have long perfected the art of wearing a poker face. These days, however, players are cloaking themselves in trendier symbols of their poker prowess - poker apparel. So instead of "Nice hand, sir," you might be more likely to hear one player say, "Nice shirt, sir!" Whether it's T-shirts or hats, jackets or silk polos, poker apparel is the biggest thing going lately. From celebrity professionals to innumerable novice online players, just about anyone who has jumped headfirst into the recent poker craze seems to want to show the world, through fashion, their love for the game.
SPORTS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,Sun Reporter | October 3, 2006
Congress raised the stakes on the online gaming industry over the weekend, and some of the biggest players in the Internet poker business are folding. The Senate tacked anti-online gambling legislation onto a homeland security bill Saturday that would effectively halt much of Internet gaming, including poker, by blocking money transfers from U.S. banks to gambling Web sites and the financial middlemen that service them. PartyGaming - a publicly held company traded on the London Stock Exchange and parent company of PartyPoker, the largest online poker site - has already said it will stop taking U.S. money customers should President Bush sign the bill, which he's expected to do before the November elections.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2005
In the world of Texas Hold 'Em, hardcore players have long perfected the art of wearing a poker face. These days, however, players are cloaking themselves in trendier symbols of their poker prowess - poker apparel. So instead of "Nice hand, sir," you might be more likely to hear one player say, "Nice shirt, sir!" Whether it's T-shirts or hats, jackets or silk polos, poker apparel is the biggest thing going lately. From celebrity professionals to innumerable novice online players, just about anyone who has jumped headfirst into the recent poker craze seems to want to show the world, through fashion, their love for the game.
NEWS
By Nicholas Leonhardt | January 30, 2005
WHAT COMMUNITY can oppose a teenage activity that does not involve alcohol, drugs, sex, fast cars or violence? Apparently, quite a few adults object when the pastime is poker. The hobby that stereotypically attracts middle-age men with fat stogies and even fatter beer bellies is now the divertissement of choice for teenage boys. A notoriously fickle lot, young males have helped to make poker games such as Texas Hold 'Em wildly popular. Yet they are dumbfounded by the parental furor over a diversion that reinforces math, improves reasoning skills, involves social interaction and might even be profitable.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Diaz and Sam Diaz,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 9, 2004
SAN JOSE, Calif. - For generations, the poker room has been portrayed as a smoke-filled parlor where whiskey-drinking, tobacco-chewing gamblers would rather shoot you than let you take the pot with a pair of fives. But recently, the Internet - and a guy aptly named Chris Moneymaker - brought new life to one of the oldest card games around. Moneymaker, an accountant from Tennessee, qualified for the May 2003 World Series of Poker in Las Vegas - after honing his poker skills on the Internet.
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