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By Dan Lips | September 22, 2010
High school students must feel like Marty McFly. In the classic 1980s movie "Back to the Future," Michael J. Fox portrays a teenager who uses a time machine to travel back to 1955. During his journey, Marty sees what it was like to attend school with his parents' generation. Teenagers heading back to school this fall must also feel like they're traveling back in time — leaving the high-tech world of 2010 to return to schools that have remained largely unchanged since the 1950s.
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NEWS
By James Grimmelmann | December 26, 2013
In the summer of 2011, Sebastian Thrun lit a fire under colleges around the world. The Stanford professor and a colleague filmed themselves lecturing for their course on artificial intelligence and put the videos online so that anyone could join. Roughly 160,000 students from around the world took them up on the offer. And even Stanford students found the videos more compelling than going to the class itself. The runaway success of the "Stanford AI Course" touched off a wave of excitement over Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)
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BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | May 16, 2012
Online education is a hot trend at the moment. But within that trend, there's an increasingly hotter sub-trend: online music education. Baltimore's Connections Academy , one of the bigger players in online K-12 education in the country, today announced that it's partnering with the Juilliard School in New York City to deliver online music education to pre-college students beginning this fall. The program is called Juilliard E-Learning. [My observation: This is a heckuva smart move by Juilliard, to extend its brand online to youngsters in K-12.
NEWS
By Elliot King and Neil Alperstein | March 5, 2013
The debate about massively open online courses, or MOOCs, has reached such fevered pitch that we recently got to witness an internecine argument about it at The New York Times. On one side was the technology-optimist columnist Thomas Friedman, who imagines a time when students in a remote village in Egypt could install a couple of computers with high-speed Internet access, hire a local facilitator and study with the best professors in the world. On the other side, the Times' editorial board felt compelled to point out that most online courses are pretty dreadful, with high dropout rates and poor learning outcomes.
NEWS
By Elliot King and Neil Alperstein | March 5, 2013
The debate about massively open online courses, or MOOCs, has reached such fevered pitch that we recently got to witness an internecine argument about it at The New York Times. On one side was the technology-optimist columnist Thomas Friedman, who imagines a time when students in a remote village in Egypt could install a couple of computers with high-speed Internet access, hire a local facilitator and study with the best professors in the world. On the other side, the Times' editorial board felt compelled to point out that most online courses are pretty dreadful, with high dropout rates and poor learning outcomes.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2010
After putting off finishing her college degree for more than two decades, Elizabeth Smith this year needed just one more class — an algebra course — to earn her bachelor's degree in theater arts. The full-time worker and single mother of two didn't have time or money to spare, so she signed up for a course offered by Baltimore-based StraighterLine Inc. She finished the course in seven days over the summer, working on her laptop as her kids frolicked in a pool. And the course cost only $138 — a fraction of the price for a similar course at a four-year or community college.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2011
The Baltimore-Washington corridor is an economic powerhouse in many areas -- federal contracting, anyone? -- but it may soon become known as the nexus of another, growing industry: online education. The $400 million purchase of a local education technology startup by a British company this fall is the latest sign that the region is successfully producing firms that develop cutting-edge technologies for schools or seek to transform them entirely. The purchase of Connections Education Inc. by Pearson PLC, a London-based education publishing conglomerate and owner of the Financial Times newspaper, was also among the biggest acquisitions of a Baltimore company in years.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2004
Laureate Education Inc., a Baltimore-based higher education provider, yesterday acquired full control of an Internet-based college that is its fastest-growing subsidiary. Laureate, formerly known as Sylvan Learning Systems, announced yesterday that it acquired the 49 percent of Walden University it didn't own for $109 million. The sum included $19 million in cash and 2.5 million shares of Laureate stock worth $90 million. In 2000, Laureate bought 41 percent of Walden, and it increased the percentage to 51 percent in 2002.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2010
Barbara Dreyer runs a virtual online education company that the longtime entrepreneur and educator hopes is making a real-world impact. As online universities soar in popularity, Dreyer's company, Connections Academy, is one of the leaders in the field of K-12 online education and partners with public and charter schools; it also offers its own online private school. It employs about 1,000 people nationwide, with nearly 300 in the Baltimore area at its headquarters in Baltimore and at a warehouse in Elkridge.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | October 12, 2012
Many thanks to Ken Holt, the chief financial officer of Woofound , and Vince Talbert, the co-founder of Bill Me Later , for sharing their words of wisdom with the Baltimore Tech Parents meetup group on Tuesday night. Ken and Vince talked about the early part of their careers, Ken in wealth management and Vince in direct marketing. They both shared their experiences in working on a startup. Ken retired from a long career at Morgan Stanley Smith Barney and jumped into a startup.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | October 12, 2012
Many thanks to Ken Holt, the chief financial officer of Woofound , and Vince Talbert, the co-founder of Bill Me Later , for sharing their words of wisdom with the Baltimore Tech Parents meetup group on Tuesday night. Ken and Vince talked about the early part of their careers, Ken in wealth management and Vince in direct marketing. They both shared their experiences in working on a startup. Ken retired from a long career at Morgan Stanley Smith Barney and jumped into a startup.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 3, 2012
The conveyance of knowledge from one wise man to a gathering of eager young people has been the model for education since Ancient Greece, and it has survived largely unchanged in the face of every kind of technology - from the printing press to the personal computer. But education - college education - may have met its match in the Internet, a force for change that television, movies, music, book publishing and newspapers could not resist. What will happen when my alma mater becomes myalmamater.com?
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | August 17, 2012
There's so much happening in Baltimore these days that my little ol' tech blog can't keep up with it. Here's what happened this week, and what's coming up that you should know about: 1. Tech Parents can party: We held the second bi-monthly Baltimore Tech Parents happy hour event on Tuesday night, at Heavy Seas Alehouse . The topic was "disruptive online education. " The guest speakers were Susan Magsamen, of Curiosityville.com, and Burck Smith, CEO of StraighterLine.com. The discussion was great.
NEWS
July 27, 2012
Regarding your recent editorial about our school, for nearly the last five years, I have had the distinct privilege of serving as president and CEO of Coppin State University ("Which way Coppin?" July 25). Our faculty, staff, and administration have worked tirelessly to provide an opportunity for students to receive a quality education. A majority of our students are first generation college students. They come from families who have not experienced the challenge of college life or had the opportunity to achieve a college degree.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | May 16, 2012
Online education is a hot trend at the moment. But within that trend, there's an increasingly hotter sub-trend: online music education. Baltimore's Connections Academy , one of the bigger players in online K-12 education in the country, today announced that it's partnering with the Juilliard School in New York City to deliver online music education to pre-college students beginning this fall. The program is called Juilliard E-Learning. [My observation: This is a heckuva smart move by Juilliard, to extend its brand online to youngsters in K-12.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2012
StraighterLine, a Baltimore-based online college education startup, expects to announce Friday that it raised $10 million from venture capital firms to market and grow its business. The company's student enrollment this year was about 1,500 students, and it expects to enroll 4,500 students over the next year. StraighterLine employs 11 people and plans to grow to more than 20 employees over the next 12 months, said Burck Smith, the company's chief executive officer and founder. The company offers online college courses for credit through a $99-a-month subscription model, an approach the company says is a response to the escalating cost of college education.
NEWS
July 27, 2012
Regarding your recent editorial about our school, for nearly the last five years, I have had the distinct privilege of serving as president and CEO of Coppin State University ("Which way Coppin?" July 25). Our faculty, staff, and administration have worked tirelessly to provide an opportunity for students to receive a quality education. A majority of our students are first generation college students. They come from families who have not experienced the challenge of college life or had the opportunity to achieve a college degree.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2011
The Baltimore-Washington corridor is an economic powerhouse in many areas -- federal contracting, anyone? -- but it may soon become known as the nexus of another, growing industry: online education. The $400 million purchase of a local education technology startup by a British company this fall is the latest sign that the region is successfully producing firms that develop cutting-edge technologies for schools or seek to transform them entirely. The purchase of Connections Education Inc. by Pearson PLC, a London-based education publishing conglomerate and owner of the Financial Times newspaper, was also among the biggest acquisitions of a Baltimore company in years.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2010
After putting off finishing her college degree for more than two decades, Elizabeth Smith this year needed just one more class — an algebra course — to earn her bachelor's degree in theater arts. The full-time worker and single mother of two didn't have time or money to spare, so she signed up for a course offered by Baltimore-based StraighterLine Inc. She finished the course in seven days over the summer, working on her laptop as her kids frolicked in a pool. And the course cost only $138 — a fraction of the price for a similar course at a four-year or community college.
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