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June 2, 2011
Ben Cardin held off about as long as possible for a modern politician, but he finally caved to intense pressure. He launched a Facebook page. "Back in 1966, when I first ran for the Maryland House of Delegates, there was no Facebook, no Twitter, no YouTube -- not even the Internet," he writes in an e-mail that just popped up on my computer. "All we had to get our message out were yard signs, fliers, volunteers and a whole lot of determination. "But while the way we communicate has changed a lot, my dedication to improving the lives of the people of Maryland hasn't.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | January 13, 2014
Rob Williams returned to his Rodgers Forge townhouse very early Thursday morning and said it was the last time, at least for that week, that he and neighbor John Falconer would face the midnight chill to distribute blankets and food to the men and women sleeping on Towson's streets. Their nightly missions during the coldest stretch in years were proving successful, but tiring. "We don't want to exhaust ourselves early in the winter," Williams said. Yet coming from a man who says if he doesn't go to bed exhausted then he hasn't given enough of himself in a given day - and whose hastily planned outreach became cause célèbre in his Towson community - it's hard to blame him for not keeping his word.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Ethan Renner and For The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
"Who's the baddest witch in town?" -- Fiona Fiona may be the baddest witch, but her time on top has left a trail of dead people in her wake. And as she ages and her powers wane, she seems more ready than ever to play fast and loose with people's lives, even going so far as to recklessly end a decades-old truce between herself and Marie The result is an episode of "American Horror Story: Coven" that sees nearly every character acting in their own best interest, consequences be damned.
ENTERTAINMENT
Ethan Renner and For The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
"Who's the baddest witch in town?" -- Fiona Fiona may be the baddest witch, but her time on top has left a trail of dead people in her wake. And as she ages and her powers wane, she seems more ready than ever to play fast and loose with people's lives, even going so far as to recklessly end a decades-old truce between herself and Marie The result is an episode of "American Horror Story: Coven" that sees nearly every character acting in their own best interest, consequences be damned.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 25, 2004
WASHINGTON -- So what's next for Howard Dean after his commanding victory in the Iowa caucuses? His money and message were simply too much for his rivals, who were ... were ... Beg pardon? What do you mean, Dr. Dean didn't win Iowa? Of course he did. Every pundit said he would. They said his lead was insurmountable. They said he was a steamroller and the other guys were tarmac. Surely he won. Definitely, he won. He didn't win? You're sure of this? Oh. Well, then ... hallelujah. I don't mind telling you that Howard Dean scares me. Not Howard Dean's proposals or his politics, but Howard Dean.
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
Close on the heels of the eclectic and engaging exhibit of Sondheim Artscape Prize winners at the Baltimore Museum of Art comes the eclectic and engaging exhibit of the Baker Artist Award winners. The annual Baker competition, administered by the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance under the direction of the William G. Baker Jr. Memorial Fund, has an unusual starting point: Artists from the Baltimore area working in any genre are invited to upload their work onto a website for anyone to see. A private jury looks at this online community of artists — more than 700 uploaded entries for this year's competition — and chooses three recipients of the $25,000 Mary Sawyers Baker Prize and awards up to nine $1,000 "b-grants.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | August 28, 2013
"I love my residents," declared Dawn Lamb, now in her 19th year as a geriatric nursing assistant at the Roland Park Place continuing care retirement community. For Lamb, 52, the love she gives to assisted living residents as a dedicated and caring aide - and the love she gets back - is what keeps her going professionally in a job that requires aides to assist residents with daily activities ranging from getting dressed to taking their medications. It also requires a lot of patience, as well as the inner strength to deal cheerfully with an aging population for whom death could come at any time.
NEWS
By Sara A. Toth, stoth@tribune.com, and Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | May 13, 2013
As details surrounding the murder conspiracy of prominent Howard County blogger Dennis Lane came to light Friday, some members of the robust and wide-reaching local blogosphere Lane helped cultivate took to their keyboards to honor their forefather; who wrote under the ephitet "Wordbones. " Lane, 58, was found stabbed to death inside his Ellicott City home early Friday morning. Charged in connection with the crime are Lane's 14-year-old daugher Morgan Lane Arnold and her boyfriend Jason Anthony Bulmer, 19, who Howard County Police said plotted for two months to commit the gruesome murder.
FEATURES
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2012
Natasha Brown-Wainwright, 41, still calls it The Twitter. She doesn't upload photos to Facebook without her 16-year-old daughter's help. Her grasp of the Web is fuzzy. But last summer, she decided to get a clue and join the latest, buzziest social media bandwagon around, Kickstarter, a site that connects entrepreneurs with small-scale donors. Her brittle business, barely making a profit after four years, needed a lift, even if it came from a source she still found baffling. "I think people in their 40s are beginning to realize their future is on the Internet, on Twitter, on Kickstarter," she says.
NEWS
Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | January 13, 2014
Rob Williams returned to his Rodgers Forge townhouse very early Thursday morning and said it was the last time, at least for that week, that he and neighbor John Falconer would face the midnight chill to distribute blankets and food to the men and women sleeping on Towson's streets. Their nightly missions during the coldest stretch in years were proving successful, but tiring. "We don't want to exhaust ourselves early in the winter," Williams said. Yet coming from a man who says if he doesn't go to bed exhausted then he hasn't given enough of himself in a given day - and whose hastily planned outreach became cause célèbre in his Towson community - it's hard to blame him for not keeping his word.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
Nick Cienski is climbing to the 14 highest and grandest places in the world - because of what he's seen in some of what are effectively the lowest and most squalid. In November 2014, the Upper Fells Point resident will scale Cho Oyu, the sixth-highest mountain in the world. When he tops the 29,906-foot mountain, located in Tibet in the western end of the Himalayas, he will have climbed six of 14 of the world's 8,000-meter-plus peaks in less than one year, breaking a world record.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | August 28, 2013
"I love my residents," declared Dawn Lamb, now in her 19th year as a geriatric nursing assistant at the Roland Park Place continuing care retirement community. For Lamb, 52, the love she gives to assisted living residents as a dedicated and caring aide - and the love she gets back - is what keeps her going professionally in a job that requires aides to assist residents with daily activities ranging from getting dressed to taking their medications. It also requires a lot of patience, as well as the inner strength to deal cheerfully with an aging population for whom death could come at any time.
NEWS
By Sara A. Toth, stoth@tribune.com, and Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | May 13, 2013
As details surrounding the murder conspiracy of prominent Howard County blogger Dennis Lane came to light Friday, some members of the robust and wide-reaching local blogosphere Lane helped cultivate took to their keyboards to honor their forefather; who wrote under the ephitet "Wordbones. " Lane, 58, was found stabbed to death inside his Ellicott City home early Friday morning. Charged in connection with the crime are Lane's 14-year-old daugher Morgan Lane Arnold and her boyfriend Jason Anthony Bulmer, 19, who Howard County Police said plotted for two months to commit the gruesome murder.
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
Close on the heels of the eclectic and engaging exhibit of Sondheim Artscape Prize winners at the Baltimore Museum of Art comes the eclectic and engaging exhibit of the Baker Artist Award winners. The annual Baker competition, administered by the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance under the direction of the William G. Baker Jr. Memorial Fund, has an unusual starting point: Artists from the Baltimore area working in any genre are invited to upload their work onto a website for anyone to see. A private jury looks at this online community of artists — more than 700 uploaded entries for this year's competition — and chooses three recipients of the $25,000 Mary Sawyers Baker Prize and awards up to nine $1,000 "b-grants.
FEATURES
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2012
Natasha Brown-Wainwright, 41, still calls it The Twitter. She doesn't upload photos to Facebook without her 16-year-old daughter's help. Her grasp of the Web is fuzzy. But last summer, she decided to get a clue and join the latest, buzziest social media bandwagon around, Kickstarter, a site that connects entrepreneurs with small-scale donors. Her brittle business, barely making a profit after four years, needed a lift, even if it came from a source she still found baffling. "I think people in their 40s are beginning to realize their future is on the Internet, on Twitter, on Kickstarter," she says.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2011
Ben Cardin held off about as long as possible for a modern politician, but he finally caved to intense pressure. He launched a Facebook page. "Back in 1966, when I first ran for the Maryland House of Delegates, there was no Facebook, no Twitter, no YouTube -- not even the Internet," he writes in an e-mail that just popped up on my computer. "All we had to get our message out were yard signs, fliers, volunteers and a whole lot of determination. "But while the way we communicate has changed a lot, my dedication to improving the lives of the people of Maryland hasn't.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 18, 2007
When a woman who calls herself Tricia discovered last week that she owed $22,302 on her credit cards, she could not wait to spread the news. Tricia, 29, who does not talk to her family or friends about her finances, says she is ashamed of her personal debt. Yet from the laundry room of her home in northern Michigan, Tricia goes online and posts intimate details of her financial life, including her net worth (now negative $38,691), the balance and finance charges on her credit cards, and the amount of debt she has paid down since starting a blog about her debt last year ($15,312)
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2005
Twas a time not long ago when college students would arrive on campus like newborn fawns - nervous and wide-eyed, looking 'round desperately for someone or something familiar. To make friends, they'd actually have to get out and about, say hello to strangers on the Yard, join clubs, talk to people. No more. These days, the computer-savvy just hop on TheFacebook.com, an Internet meet-and-greet site that has become a surprise hit across the nation, growing from a couple hundred thousand users at its inception last year to 3.2 million today.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 17, 2007
The pictures were jumpy and the words occasionally jumbled, but the most immediate and compelling descriptions of yesterday's massacre at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va., came not from seasoned reporters - but from citizen journalists, most of whom have yet to graduate from college. On CNN, the earliest on-scene pictures and words were provided by Jamal Albarghouti, a Virginia Tech graduate student from the West Bank. His cell phone pictures of police charging Norris Hall as shots rang out were broadcast and streamed over and over throughout the day. By dinnertime, CNN was featuring Albarghouti standing on campus, microphone in hand, reporting from the scene as he talked with anchorman Wolf Blitzer, who was in the cable channel's Washington newsroom.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 18, 2007
When a woman who calls herself Tricia discovered last week that she owed $22,302 on her credit cards, she could not wait to spread the news. Tricia, 29, who does not talk to her family or friends about her finances, says she is ashamed of her personal debt. Yet from the laundry room of her home in northern Michigan, Tricia goes online and posts intimate details of her financial life, including her net worth (now negative $38,691), the balance and finance charges on her credit cards, and the amount of debt she has paid down since starting a blog about her debt last year ($15,312)
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