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BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | November 18, 2007
Do you think using online financial services is just too risky? Well, think again. Online banking may actually leave you less vulnerable to fraud than traditional banking, according to Javelin Strategy and Research. To ensure that you don't fall prey to cyber fraud, be sure to follow some rules for safe online banking from Easy Money by Liz Pulliam Weston: Install a firewall. A firewall is a software program designed to allow good people in and keep bad people out. Most new computers come with firewalls integrated into their operating systems.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
At the Dundalk Post Office this week, news that the cash-strapped U.S. Postal Service would stop delivering mail on Saturdays beginning in August was greeted with a mix of apathy and understanding. Twenty-four-year-old Jordan Gillis said he wasn't surprised by the announcement. "It'll just be something that people will adjust to," said Gillis, who was running errands Wednesday for the Dundalk Music Center, where he teaches guitar. Paul Tomczewski, 75, said the announcement seemed to be a sign of a wider issue with government finances.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | November 14, 2002
Shortly after our marriage, I committed a cardinal sin: I bounced a check. My bride was mortified, and rightly so, because she worked for a bank in those days, and spent a fair amount of time showing little old ladies how to balance their checkbooks and avoid the very embarrassment that I had caused. The result: She assumed control of the family finances, and for the past 30 years I've been allowed access to the checkbook only under strict supervision. Which has worked out just fine. While this beautiful and capable woman spends Sunday afternoons negotiating the invoices and bank statements, I get to watch football, interrupted only by an occasional outburst of salty language when her numbers don't add up. Our bills get paid on time and our bank account is in the black.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2011
Just five years ago, PNC Bank had virtually no presence in Baltimore. Today, it is Maryland's third-largest financial institution by deposits, after Bank of America and M&T Bank. PNC Chairman and Chief Executive Officer James E. Rohr has led the growth of the Pittsburgh-based bank in the Baltimore region, starting with the acquisition of local institutional giant Mercantile Bankshares Corp., which owned the venerable Mercantile-Safe Deposit & Trust Co., in 2006. Since then, PNC has also opened new branches and has made smaller acquisitions, including taking over the banking services from then-Chevy Chase Bank at Giant Food stores in Maryland, Virginia, Delaware and Washington.
BUSINESS
By GREGORY KARP and GREGORY KARP,THE MORNING CALL | July 30, 2006
Are you still using a bank just because it has branches near you? If so, you're probably getting a lousy deal. Online banks have come of age and today offer the best deals in banking. Because an online bank has less overhead expense, such as window tellers and bank branches, it can offer lower fees and higher interest on checking accounts. More important, yields on savings accounts are vastly higher, often eight to 10 times what regular banks are paying. Online bank yields are like investing's Holy Grail, said Greg McBride, an analyst with Bankrate.
BUSINESS
By THE BOSTON GLOBE | November 8, 2005
Online banking, advertised by banks as nearly effortless, is about to become more cumbersome. Federal regulators, alarmed by the threat of online financial fraud, are requiring banks by the end of 2006 to provide several layers of identify verification before customers can access their accounts and conduct other banking over the Internet. In addition to standard passwords, customers may soon need a unique digital "fingerprint" that will identify their computer for the bank, or may scan a copy of their real fingerprints to identify themselves to the bank's network.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ina Paiva Cordle and Ina Paiva Cordle,Knight Ridder / Tribune | August 9, 1999
Ask your friends and co-workers if they know anyone who banks online, and the response you get may well be a blank stare. But maybe not for long.Consumers have been slow to click on to cyberbanking, yet the Internet may still live up to its promise as the new growth frontier for banks.Today, 3.3 million computer-savvy households do their banking through the Internet, paying bills and transferring money between accounts -- up from 2.5 million in 1998, according to a report issued in June by Forrester Research.
BUSINESS
By Sara Murray and Sara Murray,Sun reporter | November 4, 2007
When it's time to choose a bank, most customers look to their nearest street corner -- a move that keeps inspiring financial companies to pump millions into building more branches. Bank construction, which can cost upward of $2 million a branch, is picking up speed even as online banking keeps growing. The number of Maryland bank branches is at a decade high with financial companies fighting to recruit and retain customers, both online and in person. While some analysts have raised concerns about a saturated market, construction crews across the region are erecting more branches to bolster several banks and their brands.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | September 10, 2006
Online banking, a service that has spared consumers a trip to the branch and given them access to accounts with a few keystrokes, is about to become more complicated. Banks are rolling out security programs to better identify online customers after federal regulators, alarmed by the rising incidence and sophistication of identity theft, imposed a year-end deadline. Many banks are trying to balance security with convenience, while grappling with costs and technological challenges. For most consumers, the changes mean that a user name and password won't be enough anymore.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 18, 1998
NEW YORK -- Chase Manhattan Corp., the biggest U.S. bank, said yesterday that it will cut 4,500 jobs, or 6.5 percent of its staff, to reduce costs and invest in more profitable businesses.The bank will take a $320 million charge in the first quarter to pay for the cuts -- its second round of firings since the 1996 merger of Chase and Chemical Banking Corp. Chase expects to save $460 million annually.Chase will fire about 2,200 employees, said President Thomas Labrecque. The rest of the cuts will come from leaving vacant positions unfilled.
BUSINESS
By Tim Barker and Tim Barker,St. Louis Post-Dispatch | August 3, 2008
ST. LOUIS - In the world of passwords, there's a right way and a wrong way to protect yourself. Cliff Gaines of University City, Mo., has lived on both sides of the line. A decade ago, he was a poster child for how to do it wrong. His passwords were complicated enough. But he was committing a cardinal sin in the eyes of security evangelists: He was writing them down. Those are five words that make most experts cringe. How, they ask, do you expect to keep yourself - or your employer - safe from identity theft and computer fraud if you leave the keys to your life scribbled on a piece of paper?
BUSINESS
By MarketWatch | June 29, 2008
If you're looking for a better interest rate for your savings, an online bank may be just the ticket. Many online banks offer higher rates than their brick-and-mortar counterparts. As in any banking decision, you'll want to choose your online bank wisely. From Consumer Reports Money Adviser, here are four tips on how to evaluate an online bank: *Get the best interest rate. You can check the most recent rates at Bankrate.com. But don't stop there: Verify those rates with the banks themselves.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | June 8, 2008
Where do you turn for trusted advice on managing your money or investing? A growing number of people are looking to each other. In community groups on financial Web sites, they confess their peccadilloes with credit cards or seek advice on what's a reasonable fee for a professional planner. At some of the more sophisticated investing sites, people discuss details of a company's finances or let everyone see what's in their stock portfolio. It's like talking finances with people you meet at a party.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | November 18, 2007
Do you think using online financial services is just too risky? Well, think again. Online banking may actually leave you less vulnerable to fraud than traditional banking, according to Javelin Strategy and Research. To ensure that you don't fall prey to cyber fraud, be sure to follow some rules for safe online banking from Easy Money by Liz Pulliam Weston: Install a firewall. A firewall is a software program designed to allow good people in and keep bad people out. Most new computers come with firewalls integrated into their operating systems.
BUSINESS
By Sara Murray and Sara Murray,Sun reporter | November 4, 2007
When it's time to choose a bank, most customers look to their nearest street corner -- a move that keeps inspiring financial companies to pump millions into building more branches. Bank construction, which can cost upward of $2 million a branch, is picking up speed even as online banking keeps growing. The number of Maryland bank branches is at a decade high with financial companies fighting to recruit and retain customers, both online and in person. While some analysts have raised concerns about a saturated market, construction crews across the region are erecting more branches to bolster several banks and their brands.
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | December 29, 2006
ATLANTA -- When you log into bank accounts on the Internet over the next few days - if you haven't experienced it already - be prepared to go through another layer of "we-need-to-know-who-you-are." Financial institutions of all sizes are incorporating new security authentication measures as another layer of protection against crooks' attempts to hack into legitimate bank accounts to steal money. The deadline set by the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council - a consortium of federal banking regulatory agencies - calls for banks to establish multi-layer authentication security protocols for customer log-ins by Dec. 31. The recommendation follows a 2004 study by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.
BUSINESS
By Lorene Yue | August 15, 2004
When lenders ushered in modern online banking in the mid-1990s, they envisioned thousands of consumers logging on in their pajamas, coffee cup in hand. The prospect of applying for a mortgage from the comfort of your home at any hour of the day was supposed to revolutionize lending. While home loans have taken off - a record $3.8 trillion in new loans were made last year - getting one remains a mystery to some. But the online concept is catching on. About 18 million households have applied for some type of loan online, experts say. The numbers aren't huge, but they are significant.
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | December 29, 2006
ATLANTA -- When you log into bank accounts on the Internet over the next few days - if you haven't experienced it already - be prepared to go through another layer of "we-need-to-know-who-you-are." Financial institutions of all sizes are incorporating new security authentication measures as another layer of protection against crooks' attempts to hack into legitimate bank accounts to steal money. The deadline set by the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council - a consortium of federal banking regulatory agencies - calls for banks to establish multi-layer authentication security protocols for customer log-ins by Dec. 31. The recommendation follows a 2004 study by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | September 10, 2006
Online banking, a service that has spared consumers a trip to the branch and given them access to accounts with a few keystrokes, is about to become more complicated. Banks are rolling out security programs to better identify online customers after federal regulators, alarmed by the rising incidence and sophistication of identity theft, imposed a year-end deadline. Many banks are trying to balance security with convenience, while grappling with costs and technological challenges. For most consumers, the changes mean that a user name and password won't be enough anymore.
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