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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2001
The Howard County Council is likely to delay voting until May on a 114-page zoning bill that drew scores of worried opponents to a public hearing last week. The bill is so complex that county planners issued an equally thick document explaining each change in plain English. Both are available on the county's Web site. "It's too big a thing to rush," said western county Republican Allan H. Kittleman, who said he has a score of possible amendments. "We have to give people a chance to respond," he said, adding that some constituents complained that they learned about the omnibus bill on the day of the hearing and had scores of questions about it. Ellicott City Republican Christopher J. Merdon agreed, and council Chairman Guy J. Guzzone, a North Laurel-Savage Democrat, said, "My guess is, we won't get through it," at the work session scheduled this afternoon.
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BUSINESS
By Charles Jaffe and Charles Jaffe,Marketwatch | October 10, 2006
All too often, "securities regulation" is a form of closing the barn door after the horses are gone. Regulators are finally closing the door on most of the issues that led to the rapid-trading mutual fund scandals of 2003, and making it so that the horse thieves can't get in to revisit their crimes. Ultimately, the move could lead to sweeping changes but, for now, it's good enough to know that the industry appears to have finally closed the loopholes that led to all the trouble. This too-late solution comes in the form of Securities and Exchange Commission Rule 22c-2, which officially comes to life next Monday, although an extension has been granted to give management firms six months extra to come into compliance.
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TOPIC
By Jeff Kosseff | March 6, 2005
WASHINGTON - It doesn't matter much whether you liked the budget that President Bush presented to Congress last month or didn't. The spending plan is going to be changed a lot by Congress, and, in the end, it likely will be hard to tell just what was decided. Members of Congress will push a long list of pet measures this year. But barely any of the significant proposals will pass unless they're consolidated into a few large packages known as omnibus bills. This time-honored - and increasingly used - device means that members often don't have a chance to vote on individual policies that could affect their constituents.
NEWS
September 17, 2005
An article in Wednesday's editions of The Sun provided an incomplete description of Republican opposition to a plan by Democratic House leaders to reduce the state property tax earlier this year. All but one Republican voted against the tax break in the House Appropriations Committee, when it was amended onto to a larger omnibus budget-balancing bill. However, the omnibus bill later received a unanimous vote from the full House.
NEWS
September 17, 2005
An article in Wednesday's editions of The Sun provided an incomplete description of Republican opposition to a plan by Democratic House leaders to reduce the state property tax earlier this year. All but one Republican voted against the tax break in the House Appropriations Committee, when it was amended onto to a larger omnibus budget-balancing bill. However, the omnibus bill later received a unanimous vote from the full House.
NEWS
November 29, 2004
Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski will visit Randallstown and Dundalk today to announce federal funding for the communities in the recently passed federal omnibus appropriations bill. At 10 a.m., Mikulski and County Executive James T. Smith Jr. will be at the Liberty Family Resource Center, 3525 Resource Drive. The federal bill provides $396,800 to build a community center next to the Liberty Court and Liberty Plaza shopping centers, according to a statement from Mikulski's office. At 1:30 p.m. Mikulski and Smith will be at the Dundalk Renaissance Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | February 3, 2002
The Olympics' Most Wanted: The Top 10 Book of Gold Medal Gaffes, Improbable Triumphs and Other Oddities, by Floyd Conner (Brassey's, 288 pages, $12.95) Feeling suffocated by Olympian immediacies and hyperbole? Fight back. This Olympic trivia omnibus is abrim with just the sort of stuff that can set right the foolishness that takes over people who prattle that the international bask is more than just a game, or a cornucopia of games. To pay for transport from the U.S. to Athens for the 1896 Olympiad, where he won the triple jump, James Connally relied on bake sales.
BUSINESS
By Charles Jaffe and Charles Jaffe,Marketwatch | October 10, 2006
All too often, "securities regulation" is a form of closing the barn door after the horses are gone. Regulators are finally closing the door on most of the issues that led to the rapid-trading mutual fund scandals of 2003, and making it so that the horse thieves can't get in to revisit their crimes. Ultimately, the move could lead to sweeping changes but, for now, it's good enough to know that the industry appears to have finally closed the loopholes that led to all the trouble. This too-late solution comes in the form of Securities and Exchange Commission Rule 22c-2, which officially comes to life next Monday, although an extension has been granted to give management firms six months extra to come into compliance.
NEWS
By Anthony Lewis | May 2, 1995
THE FBI spied for decades on the NAACP and other civil rights groups that J. Edgar Hoover thought had a Communist tint. Under its COINTEL program the bureau shadowed, raided and harassed Americans who opposed the Vietnam War.The memory of those abuses is strong enough, still, to make politicians wary of responding to Oklahoma City by giving the FBI carte blanche to investigate suspected terrorists.Speaker Newt Gingrich said: "No one is suggesting the kind of open-ended authority that existed 30 years ago."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 20, 2004
WASHINGTON - House and Senate negotiators have tucked a potentially far-reaching anti-abortion provision into a $388 billion must-pass spending bill, complicating plans for Congress to end its business and adjourn for the year. The provision may be an early indication of the growing political muscle of social conservatives who provided crucial support for Republican candidates, including President Bush, in the election. It expands to all hospitals, clinics and doctors a provision that currently applies to Catholic hospitals, which do not have to comply with a federal law that requires health care providers who receive taxpayer dollars to discuss the option of abortion with women if they inquire about it. The language also allows hospitals and health care providers to opt out of state and local laws that require them to provide abortions, abortion counseling or referrals.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2005
A DETERMINED group of Ellicott City residents planned to begin this weekend collecting the first of what it hopes will be enough signatures to put the County Council's contested omnibus rezoning bill on the general election ballot next year. "We don't think it's going to be difficult at all" to gather the required 2,500 valid names by May 10, and then at least 2,500 more by June 10, in order to petition council bill No. 2 to referendum, said Angela Beltram, a former council member who is leading the drive.
TOPIC
By Jeff Kosseff | March 6, 2005
WASHINGTON - It doesn't matter much whether you liked the budget that President Bush presented to Congress last month or didn't. The spending plan is going to be changed a lot by Congress, and, in the end, it likely will be hard to tell just what was decided. Members of Congress will push a long list of pet measures this year. But barely any of the significant proposals will pass unless they're consolidated into a few large packages known as omnibus bills. This time-honored - and increasingly used - device means that members often don't have a chance to vote on individual policies that could affect their constituents.
NEWS
November 29, 2004
Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski will visit Randallstown and Dundalk today to announce federal funding for the communities in the recently passed federal omnibus appropriations bill. At 10 a.m., Mikulski and County Executive James T. Smith Jr. will be at the Liberty Family Resource Center, 3525 Resource Drive. The federal bill provides $396,800 to build a community center next to the Liberty Court and Liberty Plaza shopping centers, according to a statement from Mikulski's office. At 1:30 p.m. Mikulski and Smith will be at the Dundalk Renaissance Corp.
NEWS
November 23, 2004
NATIONAL Intelligence reform bill fails Despite a marathon week of negotiating that produced a widely supported measure to reform the nation's intelligence system, the staunch opposition of a few influential Republicans felled the House bill. Some advocates say it was doomed by the Bush administration's mixed signals. [Page 1a WORLD Iran nuclear battle all uphill The United States is facing powerful diplomatic and military obstacles in trying to influence Iran's nuclear ambiitons, even as concerns about Tehran's weapons program is growing.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 20, 2004
WASHINGTON - House and Senate negotiators have tucked a potentially far-reaching anti-abortion provision into a $388 billion must-pass spending bill, complicating plans for Congress to end its business and adjourn for the year. The provision may be an early indication of the growing political muscle of social conservatives who provided crucial support for Republican candidates, including President Bush, in the election. It expands to all hospitals, clinics and doctors a provision that currently applies to Catholic hospitals, which do not have to comply with a federal law that requires health care providers who receive taxpayer dollars to discuss the option of abortion with women if they inquire about it. The language also allows hospitals and health care providers to opt out of state and local laws that require them to provide abortions, abortion counseling or referrals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | February 3, 2002
The Olympics' Most Wanted: The Top 10 Book of Gold Medal Gaffes, Improbable Triumphs and Other Oddities, by Floyd Conner (Brassey's, 288 pages, $12.95) Feeling suffocated by Olympian immediacies and hyperbole? Fight back. This Olympic trivia omnibus is abrim with just the sort of stuff that can set right the foolishness that takes over people who prattle that the international bask is more than just a game, or a cornucopia of games. To pay for transport from the U.S. to Athens for the 1896 Olympiad, where he won the triple jump, James Connally relied on bake sales.
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | June 29, 1991
Washington. -- Sen. Joe Biden's omnibus crime bill contains several sections that are good, several other sections that are mostly makeweight, and one section that is a real ringer. The Senate is now working on the bill. A great deal of work needs to be done.This indigestible piece of legislation, S. 1241, runs to 245 pages of text containing 27 different titles. Six pages are devoted just to an index. The bill deals variously with death sentences, terrorist activities, drive-by shootings, assault weapons, drunk driving, habeas corpus proceedings and the admissibility of evidence in federal courts.
NEWS
November 23, 2004
NATIONAL Intelligence reform bill fails Despite a marathon week of negotiating that produced a widely supported measure to reform the nation's intelligence system, the staunch opposition of a few influential Republicans felled the House bill. Some advocates say it was doomed by the Bush administration's mixed signals. [Page 1a WORLD Iran nuclear battle all uphill The United States is facing powerful diplomatic and military obstacles in trying to influence Iran's nuclear ambiitons, even as concerns about Tehran's weapons program is growing.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2001
The Howard County Council is likely to delay voting until May on a 114-page zoning bill that drew scores of worried opponents to a public hearing last week. The bill is so complex that county planners issued an equally thick document explaining each change in plain English. Both are available on the county's Web site. "It's too big a thing to rush," said western county Republican Allan H. Kittleman, who said he has a score of possible amendments. "We have to give people a chance to respond," he said, adding that some constituents complained that they learned about the omnibus bill on the day of the hearing and had scores of questions about it. Ellicott City Republican Christopher J. Merdon agreed, and council Chairman Guy J. Guzzone, a North Laurel-Savage Democrat, said, "My guess is, we won't get through it," at the work session scheduled this afternoon.
NEWS
By Anthony Lewis | May 2, 1995
THE FBI spied for decades on the NAACP and other civil rights groups that J. Edgar Hoover thought had a Communist tint. Under its COINTEL program the bureau shadowed, raided and harassed Americans who opposed the Vietnam War.The memory of those abuses is strong enough, still, to make politicians wary of responding to Oklahoma City by giving the FBI carte blanche to investigate suspected terrorists.Speaker Newt Gingrich said: "No one is suggesting the kind of open-ended authority that existed 30 years ago."
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