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By ROB KASPER | October 23, 2002
I THOUGHT I was merely trying to flip an omelet, but I was actually learning culinary principles. That is what James Peterson told me a few days after I opened his latest cookbook and cracked a few eggs on a Sunday morning. Peterson is a former chef and an award-winning cookbook author. He is also a man with big ideas in his head. One of his ideas is that the way you learn to cook is to master basic principles, not blindly follow recipes. "If a cook understands what is going in a dish and how it relates to other similar dishes, he can cook from principles, not from recipes," Peterson told me. Cooking is an art form, like painting or playing music, he said.
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FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
B&O American Brasserie sous chef (and native Marylander) Matt Kane spends his days off getting down and dirty in his kitchen with his 4-year old daughter Addison. Together, they cook hearty breakfasts, like this simple but delicious vegetable-heavy Denver omelet casserole. "This is a great recipe to do with kids because it allows them to get a little messy, have fun and eat well without realizing it," says Kane. Kane takes a casual approach to cooking with kids, understanding that small hands aren't able to do everything perfectly.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | January 11, 1995
Hush puppies, a cornmeal treat, and an Oriental omelet offer a welcome change of menu.According to one -- believed-to-be-true -- fish tale, it was )R fishermen who named the hush puppy. Briefly, the story goes that after a day of fishing, they would sit by the river around a campfire over which an iron kettle filled with oil hung. In the deep, hot fat, they would fry their catch of fish, along with some cornmeal cakes. If one of their dogs would begin to howl, they'd throw it a cornmeal cake and call out "Hush, puppy!"
NEWS
February 8, 2013
Soccer registration The coed Elkridge Youth Organization spring soccer program is accepting registrations for ages 4-18. No tryouts are required, and all players receive substantial playing time. Games are played at Rockburn Park. Registration ends Feb. 28. For more information, go to eyosoccer.org or send an email with "EYO" in the subject field to eyosoccer@verizon.net . Around town Blood pressure screenings Stop in from 9 a.m. to noon Tuesdays at the Ellicott City Senior Center for free blood pressure readings by a registered nurse.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | September 26, 1990
Sun-dried tomatoes, a darling of trend-crazed foodies in the 1980s, have entered the supermarket in the 1990s.They aren't quite a staple yet, but these days it's becoming easier to find low-fat, sun-dried tomato products that can be reconstituted in only 2 minutes -- a convenience that opens up endless fast-cooking possibilities from omelets to pasta sauces.For this Fastlane Feast, I have used Sonoma Tomatoes -- an organically grown product that typically sells for $1.75 on the West Coast to $2.25 on the East Coast for a 3-ounce package.
NEWS
By Matt Simon | February 27, 2008
Michael Midgley, a contestant from Season 2 of the Bravo show Top Chef, samples an omelet Saturday at the Great Tastes Culinary Expo in Baltimore. About 3,000 ticket holders sampled food and drinks from local restaurants and wineries. Maria Dennis of MIX-106.5 took first place in a celebrity omelet cook-off with her apple-cinnamon omelet, winning $300 for Johns Hopkins Children's Center. Tying for second: Sarah Caldwell of WBAL-TV, Jessica Kartalija of WJZ-TV and Bernadette Woods of WJZ, who each won $200 for their respective charities.
NEWS
June 27, 1999
To make the greatest omelet in the world, make sure that the eggs are at room temperature by leaving them out of the refrigerator for 30 minutes before using them. Cold eggs are too stiff for an omelet. Also, if you always add a little milk to your omelet, try adding a small amount of water instead. The water will increase the volume at least three times more than the milk. The water molecules surround the eggs' protein, forcing you to use more heat to cook the protein and make it coagulate.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | November 1, 2006
It was getting to be time to say goodbye to the garden, a parting that I have always found difficult. I have a tendency to cling to the belief that the tomato plants aren't dead yet, that the peppers will rebound and that the basil will bounce back from its frosty dance with death. As the temperatures drop, so do my standards. Tomatoes and bell peppers that would have been heaved into the compost pile in August are given special treatment in October, carried into the dark basement and gingerly placed on a bed of newspapers to ripen.
NEWS
By Renee Enna | June 18, 2008
Fresh herb season is under way in gardens and pots throughout the area. So how about using them in a fast, easy and nutritious omelet? We're naming it Herbie and it's enough to feed two. And because it's quick to make, Herbie the Second won't add much time to making supper for four. Kids will like Herbie, too, especially if you use olive slices to fashion a face on the omelet. Sauvignon blanc will pair well with the herbs in the dish. For kids, a glass of milk is a fine partner. Renee Enna writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | May 9, 2007
In the morning, we'd much rather take out a Western omelet then spend the time making one at home. We ordered four from local eateries, looking for the best combination of scrambled eggs and chopped green peppers, onions and ham. Here's what we found. BEST BITE Shea's Pancake and Waffle House 215 Back River Neck Road, Essex -- 410-238-4877 Hours --6 a.m.-2 p.m. daily Restaurant's estimate --10 minutes Ready in --7 minutes Here, the large folded omelet, $7.86, was cooked a little too long.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown and Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2009
T he annual holiday brunch is always a festive get-together for members and supporters of 100 Black Men of Maryland. But this year, comfort and joy seemed to take on an extra dimension. "This seems like one of the biggest crowds we've ever had," noted president Ray Lucas, as he and event chairman Guy Bragg watched hundreds of people stream into the Martin's West ballroom. "In this kind of economy, this just gives me goose bumps," Lucas added. Members Almie McIntyre Jr. and Mel Bates stood inside the ballroom door, greeting guests.
NEWS
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | August 25, 2008
It's 7:20 a.m. at Pete's Grille in Waverly when I belly up to the counter and order a little something to get the day started: three fried egg sandwiches with bacon, lettuce, tomato and mayonnaise, three chocolate-chip pancakes, Western omelet, three slices of French toast with sugar, a bowl of grits and two cups of coffee. "The Michael Phelps breakfast?" asks waitress Lea Byington. Bring it on, I say. I shake a packet of Splenda into the coffee. Don't want to ruin this boyish physique.
NEWS
By Renee Enna | June 18, 2008
Fresh herb season is under way in gardens and pots throughout the area. So how about using them in a fast, easy and nutritious omelet? We're naming it Herbie and it's enough to feed two. And because it's quick to make, Herbie the Second won't add much time to making supper for four. Kids will like Herbie, too, especially if you use olive slices to fashion a face on the omelet. Sauvignon blanc will pair well with the herbs in the dish. For kids, a glass of milk is a fine partner. Renee Enna writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By Matt Simon | February 27, 2008
Michael Midgley, a contestant from Season 2 of the Bravo show Top Chef, samples an omelet Saturday at the Great Tastes Culinary Expo in Baltimore. About 3,000 ticket holders sampled food and drinks from local restaurants and wineries. Maria Dennis of MIX-106.5 took first place in a celebrity omelet cook-off with her apple-cinnamon omelet, winning $300 for Johns Hopkins Children's Center. Tying for second: Sarah Caldwell of WBAL-TV, Jessica Kartalija of WJZ-TV and Bernadette Woods of WJZ, who each won $200 for their respective charities.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | May 9, 2007
In the morning, we'd much rather take out a Western omelet then spend the time making one at home. We ordered four from local eateries, looking for the best combination of scrambled eggs and chopped green peppers, onions and ham. Here's what we found. BEST BITE Shea's Pancake and Waffle House 215 Back River Neck Road, Essex -- 410-238-4877 Hours --6 a.m.-2 p.m. daily Restaurant's estimate --10 minutes Ready in --7 minutes Here, the large folded omelet, $7.86, was cooked a little too long.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Sun reporter | May 7, 2007
The Auerhan family of Mount Washington returned yesterday to concrete curb underneath the Jones Falls Expressway as the Baltimore Farmers' Market came to life on its 30th opening day. "He gets the coffee, I get the food, and we meet here," said Jennifer Auerhan of the weekly outing she enjoys with her husband, Charles, and their three sons. "We've been waiting all winter." Sam, 5, declared the best part of the market to be the spicy meat pies, while Jacob, 3, said, "I like the big muffins."
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2009
The annual holiday brunch is always a festive get-together for members and supporters of 100 Black Men of Maryland. But this year, comfort and joy seemed to take on an extra dimension. "This seems like one of the biggest crowds we've ever had," noted president Ray Lucas, as he and event chairman Guy Bragg watched hundreds of people stream into the Martin's West ballroom. "In this kind of economy, this just gives me goose bumps," Lucas added. Members Almie McIntyre Jr. and Mel Bates stood inside the ballroom door, greeting guests.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 22, 2002
French toast does not sound like a traditional Cuban breakfast item. But Little Havana's owner, Tim Whisted, says he found it in a Cuban cookbook. And the two slices of batter-dipped, thick "Cuban" bread that we drowned in warm maple syrup were good enough to make us shrug off concerns about authenticity. Everything else here seemed pretty darn Cuban, from the Roy Lichtenstein-style photo of Fidel Castro shouldering a baseball bat behind the hostess stand to the "palm tree" supports shouldering the roof over the old warehouse.
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