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By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,sun reporter | October 11, 2007
Olympian Marion Jones once said she used it. And so did Tour de France winner Floyd Landis and home-run record holder Barry Bonds. Not steroids, but plant oil. Flaxseed seemed to be getting endorsements from every celebrity athlete on the defensive about illegal doping - perhaps because some say it shares a sensory quality with at least one substance banned in pro sports. But when Jones recently acknowledged that she didn't tap the flowering plant from Canada in her quest for the gold, health professionals say maybe she should have.
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By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun Reporter | January 10, 2008
Walking around the grocery store these days, it might seem possible to get a full plate of nutrition from boxes and jars in the snack aisle. Milk now comes in cereal bars, whole grains are baked into cookies, vegetables are fried into chips and vitamins are infused in soda. Recently, fat-free and low-carb were trends. Now, dietitians and consumers' groups say they are spotting the next wave of new products in the $440 billion retail food industry: so-called functional foods, or snacks and beverages that have something extra that makes them seem healthier.
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By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 11, 2005
Feeling depressed? Ask not what your parents did or didn't do when you were a child. Ask yourself what you had for dinner last night, and the night before, and the night before that. For half a dozen years, the evidence has been growing that omega-3 fatty acids, the kind found in fatty fish like salmon, sardines and tuna, can help prevent and treat depression. Rich in EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), these are among the "good" oils that have long been known to reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes.
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By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,sun reporter | October 11, 2007
Olympian Marion Jones once said she used it. And so did Tour de France winner Floyd Landis and home-run record holder Barry Bonds. Not steroids, but plant oil. Flaxseed seemed to be getting endorsements from every celebrity athlete on the defensive about illegal doping - perhaps because some say it shares a sensory quality with at least one substance banned in pro sports. But when Jones recently acknowledged that she didn't tap the flowering plant from Canada in her quest for the gold, health professionals say maybe she should have.
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By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 7, 1995
Last week's breaking nutrition news -- that eating fatty fish once a week lowers heart disease risks -- arrived hard on the heels of last month's study that said eating fish didn't lower heart disease risks.Confused? There's no need to be. Evolving research shows fish is heart-healthy food, and the "scientific process" is working just the way it's supposed to.The fish-heart disease connection is being explored because large population studies show countries in which people eat a lot of fish have low heart disease rates.
NEWS
February 3, 2006
Diet Omega-3 fatty acids' benefits questioned Eat your fatty fish and hang on, if you wish, to that bottle of tasty fish oil. But don't expect them to protect you from cancer. A new study says that foods and supplements containing omega-3 fatty acids do not offer such protection, dashing some earlier hints that they might. The analysis, which looked at 38 studies conducted between 1966 and 2005, suggests that omega-3s (found in many kinds of fish and some plants) have no significant effect on a variety of cancers, including those of the breast, colon, lung and prostate.
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By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | June 29, 2003
I've heard that Tylenol doesn't do anything to reduce inflammation, but it's easier on my stomach than ibuprofen. With my overuse injuries, does it make sense to take it? For acute overuse injuries, ibuprofen is best because it helps reduce inflammation, according to Dr. Howard Hauptman, a Towson-area rheumatologist. Common acute injuries include bursitis of the shoulder, tennis or golfer's elbow and a strain or sprain of the ankle or knee. For these, acetaminophen will relieve pain but won't reduce inflammation like ibuprofen will.
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By ROB KASPER | November 7, 1990
Someday fish packages could have a microchip embedded in their wrapping. When the fish is correctly cooked in a microwave oven, the chip would turn the oven off. This, futurists predict, will insure perfectly cooked fish.Moreover, it could, I predict, give an entirely new meaning to the phrase "fish and chips."The prospect of having your fish boss around your oven was one of the predictions I came across while reading a white paper on the seafood in the next century. The paper was the distillation of opinions and seafood-in-the-sky prophesies that came out of a gathering of food experts.
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By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun Reporter | January 10, 2008
Walking around the grocery store these days, it might seem possible to get a full plate of nutrition from boxes and jars in the snack aisle. Milk now comes in cereal bars, whole grains are baked into cookies, vegetables are fried into chips and vitamins are infused in soda. Recently, fat-free and low-carb were trends. Now, dietitians and consumers' groups say they are spotting the next wave of new products in the $440 billion retail food industry: so-called functional foods, or snacks and beverages that have something extra that makes them seem healthier.
HEALTH
By Whitney Wallace, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post. The latest post is from Whitney Wallace. We all know that eating right, getting regular physical activity and getting adequate sleep are important for overall health and healthy aging. However, did you know that there are foods that may improve your brain health? Certain foods may help improve memory and alertness. Over time, these foods may also help keep the brain sharp and prevent cognitive decline during aging.
NEWS
February 3, 2006
Diet Omega-3 fatty acids' benefits questioned Eat your fatty fish and hang on, if you wish, to that bottle of tasty fish oil. But don't expect them to protect you from cancer. A new study says that foods and supplements containing omega-3 fatty acids do not offer such protection, dashing some earlier hints that they might. The analysis, which looked at 38 studies conducted between 1966 and 2005, suggests that omega-3s (found in many kinds of fish and some plants) have no significant effect on a variety of cancers, including those of the breast, colon, lung and prostate.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 11, 2005
Feeling depressed? Ask not what your parents did or didn't do when you were a child. Ask yourself what you had for dinner last night, and the night before, and the night before that. For half a dozen years, the evidence has been growing that omega-3 fatty acids, the kind found in fatty fish like salmon, sardines and tuna, can help prevent and treat depression. Rich in EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), these are among the "good" oils that have long been known to reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | June 29, 2003
I've heard that Tylenol doesn't do anything to reduce inflammation, but it's easier on my stomach than ibuprofen. With my overuse injuries, does it make sense to take it? For acute overuse injuries, ibuprofen is best because it helps reduce inflammation, according to Dr. Howard Hauptman, a Towson-area rheumatologist. Common acute injuries include bursitis of the shoulder, tennis or golfer's elbow and a strain or sprain of the ankle or knee. For these, acetaminophen will relieve pain but won't reduce inflammation like ibuprofen will.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 7, 1995
Last week's breaking nutrition news -- that eating fatty fish once a week lowers heart disease risks -- arrived hard on the heels of last month's study that said eating fish didn't lower heart disease risks.Confused? There's no need to be. Evolving research shows fish is heart-healthy food, and the "scientific process" is working just the way it's supposed to.The fish-heart disease connection is being explored because large population studies show countries in which people eat a lot of fish have low heart disease rates.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 7, 1990
Someday fish packages could have a microchip embedded in their wrapping. When the fish is correctly cooked in a microwave oven, the chip would turn the oven off. This, futurists predict, will insure perfectly cooked fish.Moreover, it could, I predict, give an entirely new meaning to the phrase "fish and chips."The prospect of having your fish boss around your oven was one of the predictions I came across while reading a white paper on the seafood in the next century. The paper was the distillation of opinions and seafood-in-the-sky prophesies that came out of a gathering of food experts.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN | October 6, 2008
Both Yoplait Kids Lowfat Yogurt and Stonyfield Farm's YoKids Organic Lowfat Yogurt have less sugar (each has 13 grams) than some regular kids' yogurt brands. But there are differences in calories and fat between the two. You'll save 20 calories, 1 gram of saturated fat, 4 grams carbohydrate and 5 milligrams cholesterol if you choose the 4-ounce serving of Stonyfield Strawberry Vanilla over the same size Yoplait Kids Strawberry Vanilla (which does advertise 16 milligrams of healthy Omega-3 fatty acids per serving)
EXPLORE
By David Tayman, D.V.M | October 4, 2011
Q: What's the best way to address a cat's dry, flaky skin?   A: Common causes for dry kitty skin include allergic reactions (to food, dust or flea bites) and poor diet, but it could also signal kidney, liver, heart, adrenal or thyroid problems. A thorough examination by your veterinarian should be your first step, to rule out any serious underlying medical conditions that may be the true cause of dry, itchy skin. Food allergies are often assumed to be the culprit for dry skin in cats when, in reality, food allergies may cause only 10 percent of skin disorders in pets.         A healthy diet for cats should contain sufficient omega-3 fatty acids, which are crucial for healthy skin and coats.
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