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January 3, 2006
A boxer (Omar Epps, above) helps a female promoter fight her way into the sport in Against the Ropes (8 p.m.-10 p.m., TMC).
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October 9, 2007
Critic's Pick -- Foreman (Omar Epps) resorts to House-like behavior to help a patient in House (9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45).
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By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1999
If it were possible to root for a movie, "The Wood" would deserve it, for what it aspires to be: a sweet, funny, coming-of-age film with likable African-American characters.For significant portions of the film, "The Wood" hits its target, but it ultimately misses enough to leave its audience slightly unsatisfied.To his credit, director Rick Famuyiwa, in his feature debut, has crafted a film that is largely grounded in reality, as opposed to other films of its genre -- say, for instance, "How to Be a Player" or the infamous "Booty Call."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 20, 2004
Meg Ryan wants a change. Badly. After more than a decade of romantic-comedy roles, at which she became a modern-day master, Meg aspires to more. She's tried playing an Army hero (Courage Under Fire). Last year, she tried showing considerable amounts of skin in a dark murder-mystery (In The Cut). Now, in Against the Ropes, she's playing a female boxing manager from the Bronx. Someone needs to tell her that a mark of wisdom is understanding one's limitations. Based loosely on the life of Jackie Kallen, whose success in the late '80s proved something of a shocker to the all-boys club of boxing managers, the movie casts Ryan as an underappreciated secretary to an obnoxious fight promoter.
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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1999
If only "The Mod Squad" were as sophisticated as it is self-referential, or as smart as it is funny.The movie, like the 1968-1973 TV show, was produced by youth-TV king Aaron Spelling. And, like the worst kind of TV show, it's really, really dumb.That's not to say it isn't likable. The chief reasons for its appeal are its stars: Claire Danes, Omar Epps and Giovanni Ribisi as the young would-be criminals who are recruited as an undercover police squad.They're supposed to be really tough, though we never see the lives of crime from which they've been redeemed.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 20, 2004
Meg Ryan wants a change. Badly. After more than a decade of romantic-comedy roles, at which she became a modern-day master, Meg aspires to more. She's tried playing an Army hero (Courage Under Fire). Last year, she tried showing considerable amounts of skin in a dark murder-mystery (In The Cut). Now, in Against the Ropes, she's playing a female boxing manager from the Bronx. Someone needs to tell her that a mark of wisdom is understanding one's limitations. Based loosely on the life of Jackie Kallen, whose success in the late '80s proved something of a shocker to the all-boys club of boxing managers, the movie casts Ryan as an underappreciated secretary to an obnoxious fight promoter.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 11, 1995
Until it surrenders to its own worst instincts toward the end, John Singleton's "Higher Learning" is a bracing, invigorating and resolutely fair-minded critique of college education in America.The site is Columbus University -- the irony of naming the school after the star in the new pantheon of oppressor-chic is one of the film's many heavy-as-uranium strokes -- somewhere in California, an institution so diverse it's nearly tribal. Singleton, who wrote and directed, has no sense of an ivory tower; if the tower is ivory, it was built by African slaves working with materials stolen from the Mother Country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 17, 1992
When the boyz in the 'hood -- his 'hood -- started dying, Ernest R. Dickerson decided it was time to do something about it.Dickerson, of course, was just coming into fame as Spike Lee's cinematographer. Having met Lee at NYU film school, Dickerson shot Lee's earliest films, including "She's Gotta Have It," the break-out film that put them both on the map."But I'd always wanted to bounce back and forth between strictly shooting and directing," the grave, 38-year-old filmmaker recalls today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 17, 1992
A gun can't get it for you. A gun only makes you think you have it. But when you pull it and people's eyes get big and they back down, it's not because of you, it's because of the gun. You're still a boy.What is it?Aretha knew. She called it "R.E.S.P.E.C.T." The tragedy of our society is that many young men, undervalued by the world around them and unaware of any possibility of moving on up, think that when they pack that rod -- and feel the thrill and taste the power -- they're achieving respect; they believe they're telling the world for the first time: "Find out what it means to me."
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By Carina Chocano and Carina Chocano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 5, 2004
Things have changed since 1966, and Charles Shyer's remake of Alfie reminds us of just how much. The movie that introduced Michael Caine as a Cockney womanizer at the dawn of the Playboy era played like a warning label on the sexual revolution. Compared with the original, the new Alfie, which stars twinkly eyed Jude Law as a British limo driver in Manhattan, is a bright gumball skittering across a marble floor. We're meant to attribute the remake's decidedly chirpier, breezier tone to feminism and the all-around social progress of the intervening four decades.
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By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1999
If it were possible to root for a movie, "The Wood" would deserve it, for what it aspires to be: a sweet, funny, coming-of-age film with likable African-American characters.For significant portions of the film, "The Wood" hits its target, but it ultimately misses enough to leave its audience slightly unsatisfied.To his credit, director Rick Famuyiwa, in his feature debut, has crafted a film that is largely grounded in reality, as opposed to other films of its genre -- say, for instance, "How to Be a Player" or the infamous "Booty Call."
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1999
If only "The Mod Squad" were as sophisticated as it is self-referential, or as smart as it is funny.The movie, like the 1968-1973 TV show, was produced by youth-TV king Aaron Spelling. And, like the worst kind of TV show, it's really, really dumb.That's not to say it isn't likable. The chief reasons for its appeal are its stars: Claire Danes, Omar Epps and Giovanni Ribisi as the young would-be criminals who are recruited as an undercover police squad.They're supposed to be really tough, though we never see the lives of crime from which they've been redeemed.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 11, 1995
Until it surrenders to its own worst instincts toward the end, John Singleton's "Higher Learning" is a bracing, invigorating and resolutely fair-minded critique of college education in America.The site is Columbus University -- the irony of naming the school after the star in the new pantheon of oppressor-chic is one of the film's many heavy-as-uranium strokes -- somewhere in California, an institution so diverse it's nearly tribal. Singleton, who wrote and directed, has no sense of an ivory tower; if the tower is ivory, it was built by African slaves working with materials stolen from the Mother Country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 17, 1992
When the boyz in the 'hood -- his 'hood -- started dying, Ernest R. Dickerson decided it was time to do something about it.Dickerson, of course, was just coming into fame as Spike Lee's cinematographer. Having met Lee at NYU film school, Dickerson shot Lee's earliest films, including "She's Gotta Have It," the break-out film that put them both on the map."But I'd always wanted to bounce back and forth between strictly shooting and directing," the grave, 38-year-old filmmaker recalls today.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | January 19, 2009
On tonight's House, the cranky doctor finally gets a patient he can relate to. In this new episode, House (Hugh Laurie) and his team try to figure out what's wrong with a man suffering from chronic pain - something House has lived with for years. No word on whether the patient is also an insufferable jerk. Meanwhile, Foreman and Thirteen (Omar Epps and Olivia Wilde) deal with their budding relationship, and Cuddy (Lisa Edelstein) gets a lesson in juggling work and parenthood. The medical mystery show now in its fifth season celebrates its 100 episode next month.
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