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SPORTS
By Dan Mihalopoulos and Philip Hersh and Dan Mihalopoulos and Philip Hersh,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 14, 2004
ATHENS - As athletes marched down the Olympic Stadium track yesterday in what should have been a moment of pure joy for Greeks, their biggest hopeful to win a gold medal on that track remained in a hospital a few miles away. Instead of lighting the Olympic flame, as newspapers here had predicted, Kostas Kenteris was at the center of a controversy sparked by his failure to appear for a doping test Thursday. The Greek Olympic Committee called an emergency meeting for today to discuss the status of Kenteris, the defending gold medalist at 200 meters, and fellow track medal contender Katerina Thanou.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1996
ATLANTA -- The 100-meter finals in last night's U.S. Olympic track and field trials had the air of a much-hyped Vegas boxing show. It began with Gwen Torrence chasing down Gail Devers, and ended with Carl Lewis down on the track after finishing dead last.Lewis, looking to make his fifth Olympic team, never got out of the blocks after suffering from a cramp in his calf prior to the final. It isn't known whether the injury will affect Lewis' bid to make the team in the 200 meters or long jump.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia -- Today's cinema schedule lists an 11 a.m. showing of "Alien," with subtitles in Hungarian. On one of the pool tables, a man from Moldavia is teaching a girl from Bangladesh how to break. A large Cuban flag hangs from a balcony near the main entrance. Complete with a view of the flame atop the 110,000-seat Olympic Stadium, the Olympic Village is where approximately 15,000 athletes and coaches from around the world have gotten their mail this month. The 24-hour dining hall can seat nearly 5,000.
FEATURES
By Erika Young | July 12, 1992
With the 1992 Summer Olympics fast approaching I picture myself standing in the host city, breathing the salty air from the Mediterranean Sea, listening to church bells toll and proud Spaniards shouting, "Saludo, Saludo -- Welcome to Barcelona!"Many flags will be at the Olympic stadium for the first time: those of countries that only recently have won their independence. Missing will be the flags of the Soviet Union, East Germany and other former communist countries.Instead of witnessing the thrilling events in person, I can only dream about them with the help of the newspaper and television, or console myself with these words from a song by Franz Lehar: "Happy is he who forgets what he cannot change."
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | October 6, 1991
Apparently, time flies whether you're having fun or not.This is it. This is the last day anyone will walk through the turnstiles at Memorial Stadium to watch the Baltimore Orioles, unless, of course, the Maryland Stadium Authority got a contractor referral from the Montreal Expos.Turn out the lights. The season's over.It is the end of an era. It was the best of times. It was the worst of times. It is the autumn of hope. It was the summer of our discontent. It was a season to remember. It was a season to forget.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | October 1, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia ---They had too much fun. That was the problem with the way Baltimore's Bernard Williams and his 400-meter relay teammates celebrated after winning a gold medal last night in Olympic Stadium. A little bit of joyful preening and silliness is fine at such a moment for any athlete so inclined, but Williams and his teammates just kept going. And going. Too far. And for too long. They were happy beyond words and celebrating the accomplishment of a lifetime, of course, and everyone recognized that.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | July 29, 1996
After Saturday morning's bombing of Centennial Olympic Park, did the city of Atlanta bounce back yesterday and show resilience and defiance at the specter of terrorism, or was it still enveloped in a fog of gloom and despair?On "Sunday Morning," two correspondents were proclaiming that the Olympics, and by extension, Atlanta, always would be scarred by the pipe bombing that killed one person directly, left a Turkish cameraman, who was attempting to cover the blast, dead of a heart attack and injured more than 100 people.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2002
MONTREAL - The weather is still winter-brisk in this extremely northern baseball suburb of Washington, which is one of the many reasons fans have been slow to warm up to the young and exciting Montreal Expos. The Canadiens are in the NHL playoffs for the first time in four years. School doesn't let out for another month. And, if you really want to get technical about it, there's also that thing about Major League Baseball's closing the franchise for lack of interest or moving it to some more economically attractive location in the next year or so. New manager Frank Robinson, who has been charged with keeping the Expos competitive until who knows what happens to the franchise, looks into the empty stands at Olympic Stadium and summons up the only words he can find to describe the feeling.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 29, 2004
BEIJING - For a city so consumed with remaking itself in time for the 2008 Olympics - building enough stadiums, roads and apartments to equip an entirely new capital - it is an odd sight: At the two highest-profile projects for the Beijing Games, the Olympic stadium and the swimming center, the work has all but stopped. But no one seems nervous about finishing the projects on time. On the contrary, organizers are trying to make sure they don't finish too early. When Athens was frantically working to be ready for this summer's Games, Beijing was laying foundations for structures that don't need to be finished for four more years.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Peter Schmuck contributed to this article | July 20, 1996
ATLANTA -- The Centennial Olympic Games got under way here last night by following a new creed for the opening ceremonies at Olympic Stadium. It was a creed for the '90s, and for the kind of show this city and its local organizers have been promising since they received the bid six years ago.Longer, larger, louder.And maybe more dramatic.Before a crowd of 83,100 roaring fans that included President Clinton and his family, before a worldwide television audience expected to reach some 3.5 billion, and with the largest gathering of nations and athletes in the history of this quadrennial competition, the 1996 Games officially opened for business.
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