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By New York Times News Service | January 16, 1994
The State of Georgia will begin developing a 72-acre Olympic park in downtown Atlanta on a site now occupied largely by distressed residential and commercial properties, despite the protests of residents who would be displaced.At a news conference last week with Mayor Bill Campbell of Atlanta and Olympic officials, Gov. Zell Miller said he had decided to endorse the plan, which was proposed by the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games, the private corporation that will stage the 1996 Olympics.
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FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
Vladimir Luxuria, Europe's first openly transgender parliamentarian, was reportedly detained twice in Sochi this week for supporting LGBT rights at the Winter Olympics. Luxuria, a former Communist member of parliament in Italy, was stopped by four men after donning rainbow-colored garb and yelling "It's OK to be gay" outside the Olympic hockey stadium, according to the Associated Press .  The men reportedly escorted her to a car, stripped her of her Olympics pass and dropped her off in the Russian countryside.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 23, 1997
ATLANTA -- For the fourth time in seven months, a bomb exploded in Atlanta on Friday night, injuring at least five people at a gay nightclub and causing law-enforcement officials to speculate that a serial bomber may be at large.As police investigated the bombing at the Otherside Lounge, they found a backpack containing a second bomb in the club's parking lot. Using a robot, the city's bomb squad detonated the second device without incident.Last month, a bomb was detonated outside a north Atlanta abortion clinic.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 27, 2014
My husband the sportswriter has left to challenge the elements, and he isn't even The Weather Channel's Jim Cantore. He is in New York to cover the first-ever open-air Super Bowl in a northern city - the Denver Broncos play the Seattle Seahawks in East Rutherford, N.J., this Sunday. And the last bit of confetti will still be floating to the turf when he leaves to cover the Olympics in Sochi, Russia, the first winter games to be held in a sub-tropical resort, a place where the average temperature in February is 50 degrees.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris | August 17, 2007
This is the last in a three-part series on Maryland-based finalists for the Service to America Medals, or Sammies, one of the highest honors bestowed on civil servants. The winners will be announced next month. One of the last pieces of evidence Olympic park bomber Eric Rudolph saw in a Huntsville, Ala., courtroom was a green Popular Mechanics toolbox covered in fake green foliage. A team of explosive experts from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, working under Michael Ethridge of Clarksville, had meticulously reconstructed Rudolph's fourth and final bombing, even purchasing the toolbox and most of the bomb's parts from the same Murphy, N.C., Wal-Mart as Rudolph had. Rudolph disguised the bomb as a plant and detonated it with a model-airplane remote control.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | February 11, 2002
Mary Poppins and her spoonful of sugar never met Mitt Romney and his free pin. Olympic organizers couldn't get enough buses to haul 20,000 spectators from roadside parking to the site of ski jumping and luge. That mile-long stretch of road has a grade of 10 percent, with an Olympic difficulty factor: an altitude of more than 7,100 feet. By offering a commemorative "Gold Medal Mile" pin, officials enticed thousands to pound the pavement. A low-power radio station run by Utah Olympic Park - KUOP - took requests from walkers with cell phones.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen | September 27, 2000
One of the logistical pleasures of the Olympics is the rail system, albeit a must in Homebush Bay, where there is no public parking. Along with the Olympic Stadium, several domes and other first-rate facilities, the Sydney organizing committee built a rail terminal that has moved several hundred thousand fans in and out of Olympic Park every day. It's about a 25-minute trip from Central Station in Sydney to the Olympic Park station, and it comes in...
NEWS
November 26, 2013
Below is a schedule of some of of this year's Towson Winterfest, which kicks off with the annual tree lighting ceremony on Nov. 29 and is highlighted by Fire & Ice Night on Dec. 13. Friday, Nov. 29 All-day special promotions downtown 6 to 8 p.m.-Baltimore County Tree Lighting, Olympic Park. Event includes: • Santa's arrival by fire engine • Tree lighting ceremony • Opening of Santa's Workshop at old Hutzlers with Beau and Tinsel, the talking reindeer Thursdays, Dec. 5, 12, 19 Ho Ho Happy Hours: food and drink specials at participating businesses Saturday, Dec. 7 • 9 a.m.-Breakfast with The Grinch, Souris' 537 York Road, Towson Circle: holiday breakfast: $5 children, $10 adults • 9:30 to 11 a.m.-Holiday movie and Santa's Workshop, 1 E. Joppa Road, Towson Circle: children create holiday gifts, 10:30 a.m.-watch "The Grinch" Friday, Dec. 13 (rain date Dec. 20)
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Jean Marbella and Peter Schmuck and Jean Marbella,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
ATLANTA -- The party was over on Peachtree Street. The scores of late-night Olympic revelers had been pulled back into a dangerous world in one awful, sobering moment, and the reality of it all was just starting to sink in."It was just madness," said Eason Jacob of New York. "I've never been around anything like that before in my life."Jacob was one of the thousands in downtown Atlanta who felt the sonic thud of the pipe bomb that exploded in the Centennial Olympic Park, killing one person, leading to the death of another and injuring 111 more.
NEWS
By Ellen Barry and Jenny Jarvie and Ellen Barry and Jenny Jarvie,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 14, 2005
ATLANTA - Olympic park bomber Eric Rudolph, who led federal authorities on a five-year cat-and-mouse game in the woods of North Carolina, showed a defiant face in court yesterday, boasting in a statement that he had "deprived the government of its goal of sentencing me to death." Rudolph pleaded guilty yesterday to four bombings as part of a plea agreement that will allow him to escape the death penalty. In the morning, he appeared before a judge in Birmingham, Ala., where he pleaded guilty in the 1998 bombing of a clinic that performed abortions.
NEWS
November 26, 2013
Below is a schedule of some of of this year's Towson Winterfest, which kicks off with the annual tree lighting ceremony on Nov. 29 and is highlighted by Fire & Ice Night on Dec. 13. Friday, Nov. 29 All-day special promotions downtown 6 to 8 p.m.-Baltimore County Tree Lighting, Olympic Park. Event includes: • Santa's arrival by fire engine • Tree lighting ceremony • Opening of Santa's Workshop at old Hutzlers with Beau and Tinsel, the talking reindeer Thursdays, Dec. 5, 12, 19 Ho Ho Happy Hours: food and drink specials at participating businesses Saturday, Dec. 7 • 9 a.m.-Breakfast with The Grinch, Souris' 537 York Road, Towson Circle: holiday breakfast: $5 children, $10 adults • 9:30 to 11 a.m.-Holiday movie and Santa's Workshop, 1 E. Joppa Road, Towson Circle: children create holiday gifts, 10:30 a.m.-watch "The Grinch" Friday, Dec. 13 (rain date Dec. 20)
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
Many Baltimoreans declare that their morning commute only becomes bearable when tuned into the crazy antics of WWMX-FM morning radio host Reagan Warfield. He regularly interviews world-famous celebrities and rock stars and banters with a widespread listening audience, but his most popular calling card is being the largely undefeatable star of the show's pop-culture trivia game "Smarter Than Reagan. " While many DJs enjoy the faceless public anonymity of radio, Warfield is known for participating in a number of regional charity events while also finding time to teach at his alma mater, Loyola University Maryland.
SPORTS
By Mike Bresnahan, Tribune Newspapers | July 28, 2012
A handful of journalists were on hand to watch the U.S. women's basketball team win its Olympic opener against Croatia. It was an obvious contrast to the crammed news conference the previous day for the U.S. men's team, where reporters scurried toward Kobe Bryant and LeBron James before packing into a dense semi-circle seven or eight people deep. "This is more physical than our games," Bryant quipped as media members pushed and shoved one another. "I've seen at least two flagrant fouls.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris | August 17, 2007
This is the last in a three-part series on Maryland-based finalists for the Service to America Medals, or Sammies, one of the highest honors bestowed on civil servants. The winners will be announced next month. One of the last pieces of evidence Olympic park bomber Eric Rudolph saw in a Huntsville, Ala., courtroom was a green Popular Mechanics toolbox covered in fake green foliage. A team of explosive experts from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, working under Michael Ethridge of Clarksville, had meticulously reconstructed Rudolph's fourth and final bombing, even purchasing the toolbox and most of the bomb's parts from the same Murphy, N.C., Wal-Mart as Rudolph had. Rudolph disguised the bomb as a plant and detonated it with a model-airplane remote control.
NEWS
By Ellen Barry and Jenny Jarvie and Ellen Barry and Jenny Jarvie,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 14, 2005
ATLANTA - Olympic park bomber Eric Rudolph, who led federal authorities on a five-year cat-and-mouse game in the woods of North Carolina, showed a defiant face in court yesterday, boasting in a statement that he had "deprived the government of its goal of sentencing me to death." Rudolph pleaded guilty yesterday to four bombings as part of a plea agreement that will allow him to escape the death penalty. In the morning, he appeared before a judge in Birmingham, Ala., where he pleaded guilty in the 1998 bombing of a clinic that performed abortions.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | February 11, 2002
Mary Poppins and her spoonful of sugar never met Mitt Romney and his free pin. Olympic organizers couldn't get enough buses to haul 20,000 spectators from roadside parking to the site of ski jumping and luge. That mile-long stretch of road has a grade of 10 percent, with an Olympic difficulty factor: an altitude of more than 7,100 feet. By offering a commemorative "Gold Medal Mile" pin, officials enticed thousands to pound the pavement. A low-power radio station run by Utah Olympic Park - KUOP - took requests from walkers with cell phones.
SPORTS
By Mike Bresnahan, Tribune Newspapers | July 28, 2012
A handful of journalists were on hand to watch the U.S. women's basketball team win its Olympic opener against Croatia. It was an obvious contrast to the crammed news conference the previous day for the U.S. men's team, where reporters scurried toward Kobe Bryant and LeBron James before packing into a dense semi-circle seven or eight people deep. "This is more physical than our games," Bryant quipped as media members pushed and shoved one another. "I've seen at least two flagrant fouls.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
Vladimir Luxuria, Europe's first openly transgender parliamentarian, was reportedly detained twice in Sochi this week for supporting LGBT rights at the Winter Olympics. Luxuria, a former Communist member of parliament in Italy, was stopped by four men after donning rainbow-colored garb and yelling "It's OK to be gay" outside the Olympic hockey stadium, according to the Associated Press .  The men reportedly escorted her to a car, stripped her of her Olympics pass and dropped her off in the Russian countryside.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | September 28, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - James Carter listened for boos and jeering whistles when he was introduced to the crowd before the final of the men's 400-meter hurdles at Olympic Park last night. "I was hoping I wouldn't hear anything," he said. He didn't. The packed house of 110,000 at Olympic Stadium barely responded to his name. It meant he had survived the biggest mistake of his life - barely. "I just don't want people to have that as their image of me," said Carter, a Baltimore native who went to Mervo.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen | September 27, 2000
One of the logistical pleasures of the Olympics is the rail system, albeit a must in Homebush Bay, where there is no public parking. Along with the Olympic Stadium, several domes and other first-rate facilities, the Sydney organizing committee built a rail terminal that has moved several hundred thousand fans in and out of Olympic Park every day. It's about a 25-minute trip from Central Station in Sydney to the Olympic Park station, and it comes in...
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