Advertisement
HomeCollectionsOlympic Movement
IN THE NEWS

Olympic Movement

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
February 26, 1992
It appears that fans of the Olympic movement can be as fickle as some of the judges in the competition.When asked if some of the world's best professional figure skaters, such as Brian Boitano, Katarina Witt and Scott Hamilton, be allowed to compete in the 1994 Norway Games, 153 of 232 respondents (66 percent) said yes. However, when asked if the Games should return to amateur status, only 125 of 232 (54 percent) said yes."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically, as would be done in a scientific public opinion poll.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
In news as infuriating as it is unsurprising, International Olympic Committee officials said Thursday they were "fully satisfied" that a Russian law barring gay propaganda doesn't violate the Olympic charter's anti-discrimination language, the Washington Post reports . To repeat: A law engineered under the auspices of preventing gay and lesbian individuals from indoctrinating the youth (I'm reading between the lines here) both in person and through the media is apparently consistent with the Olympic Charter's language on discrimination.
Advertisement
SPORTS
December 4, 1991
Helmick informs IOC of his resignationRobert Helmick's free fall from the heights of the Olympic movement continued yesterday, when the Des Moines, Iowa, lawyer and former president of the U.S. Olympic Committee resigned from the International Olympic Committee.Helmick, speaking by telephone to the Los Angeles Times from the site of an IOC executive board meeting in Lausanne, Switzerland, said he informed IOC president Juan Antonio Samaranch of his decision last night.In a formal letter of resignation later delivered to Samaranch's hotel room, Helmick said: "I am taking this action because I believe it is the decent thing to do and because it serves the best interests of the IOC and the United States Olympic movement by returning the focus to the programs for athletes."
SPORTS
By Philip Hersh and Philip Hersh,Tribune Newspapers | October 4, 2009
COPENHAGEN - - That Rio won the 2016 Summer Games is easily understandable. The International Olympic Committee fancies itself a force in global affairs. As in the case of breaking Olympic ground by giving the 2008 Olympics to China, the world's most populous country, Friday's vote was a chance for the IOC to say that by giving the first Olympics to South America, it will have aided the development of Brazil, the most populous country on the continent. That Chicago was eliminated in the first round, as shocking as it seemed, also was understandable, given the IOC's Byzantine internal politics, its fractious relationship with the country whose companies have been its cash cow and the way the host-city election system is structured.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2001
The Salt Lake Organizing Committee for the Olympic Winter Games and the city yesterday announced the nomination process for the Salt Lake 2002 Olympic Torch Relay, which is expected to bring the flame to Baltimore on Dec. 22. To become a torchbearer, the SLOC requires applicants to write an essay of 50 to 100 words that describes why they or their nominee should be chosen. Candidates may have inspired others to great achievement, been a source of inspiration in the community, embodied the inspirational spirit of the Olympic movement or motivated others by encountering and overcoming adversity.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss | August 27, 2000
Peter G. Angelos - UP- Hello, reality. First the purge, and now the owner admits that signing Albert Belle was "a mistake." Nice call. Didn't Jerry Reinsdorf say the same thing? A Bittersweet Symphony, indeed. Ripken intrigue - DOWN - No contract offer and no clearance to play. A day after Ripken says he's ready to go, the club suggests otherwise. By the way, happy birthday. Alligator Alley - UP - The Orioles were once interested in merging their major- and minor-league spring operations.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 11, 1997
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- This beautiful port city at the tip of Africa is using all its charms in an ambitious bid to become the first African venue for the Olympic Summer Games in 2004.Snuggled beneath Table Mountain and close to the Cape where the Atlantic becomes the Indian Ocean, Cape Town offers a staggering setting for the world's premier sporting event.The South African bid faces competition from Athens, Stockholm, Buenos Aires and Rome, but Cape Town remains optimistic that its magnificent setting will prove irresistible.
SPORTS
By Philip Hersh and Philip Hersh,Tribune Newspapers | October 4, 2009
COPENHAGEN - - That Rio won the 2016 Summer Games is easily understandable. The International Olympic Committee fancies itself a force in global affairs. As in the case of breaking Olympic ground by giving the 2008 Olympics to China, the world's most populous country, Friday's vote was a chance for the IOC to say that by giving the first Olympics to South America, it will have aided the development of Brazil, the most populous country on the continent. That Chicago was eliminated in the first round, as shocking as it seemed, also was understandable, given the IOC's Byzantine internal politics, its fractious relationship with the country whose companies have been its cash cow and the way the host-city election system is structured.
SPORTS
By Philip Hersh | July 6, 2007
Guatemala City -- In a clear attempt to improve its international standing, the U.S. Olympic Committee has thrown its full backing to the Youth Olympic Games, the pet project of International Olympic Committee president Jacques Rogge. The IOC members voted unanimously yesterday in favor of the new event, which would include summer and winter editions for athletes ages 14 to 18. "We would like to offer our resources as well as our support," USOC vice president Bob Ctvrtlik told the membership during pre-vote discussion at the IOC's annual meeting yesterday.
NEWS
By Rone Tempest and Rone Tempest,Los Angeles Times | July 10, 1991
LAUSANNE, Switzerland -- Twenty-one years after it was expelled from Olympic competition for its racially discriminatory policy of apartheid, South Africa won readmission from the International Olympic Committee here yesterday, opening the door for South African athletes to participate in the 1992 Summer Games in Barcelona, Spain.The historic decision, based largely on the South African Parliament's repeal of key apartheid statutes in June, is expected to boost the reform movement of South African President F. W. de Klerk.
SPORTS
By Philip Hersh | July 6, 2007
Guatemala City -- In a clear attempt to improve its international standing, the U.S. Olympic Committee has thrown its full backing to the Youth Olympic Games, the pet project of International Olympic Committee president Jacques Rogge. The IOC members voted unanimously yesterday in favor of the new event, which would include summer and winter editions for athletes ages 14 to 18. "We would like to offer our resources as well as our support," USOC vice president Bob Ctvrtlik told the membership during pre-vote discussion at the IOC's annual meeting yesterday.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | January 6, 2006
Nude Olympic luge babes promoting alcohol shooters seemed like a good idea at the time. But now two Florida businessmen and a sports agent are in hot water with U.S. Olympic officials for the unauthorized use of a snapshot of seven teammates - tastefully shielded by their red sleds - and the sacred "O" word to hype a bar drinking game called ShotLuge. "We have forwarded this to our legal department," said U.S. Olympic Committee spokesman Darryl Seibel. "This Web site and the activity it promotes would appear to be inconsistent with the Olympic movement."
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | November 24, 2005
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -- Rachel Steer shoots as well as she skis, which is good news for the U.S. Olympic team and bad news for the caribou. The biathlete and avid sportswoman from Alaska is trying to make the squad that will travel to Turin, Italy, in February for the Winter Games. It would be a great finish to a career that includes a strong showing on the World Cup circuit and participation in the 2002 Olympics. The leaders of her sport and the U.S. Olympic movement are promoting her as possible medal material.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2001
SALT LAKE CITY - The Baltimore-Washington area's quest to be host to the 2012 Summer Olympic Games took a big step forward yesterday - along with bids from New York, San Francisco and Houston - as the United States Olympic Committee cut in half the number of cities it was considering. The paring of what had been eight U.S. cities vying for the Games followed a unanimous vote by the committee designated by the USOC to tour those cities last summer and study their bids. Eliminated from the race for the 2012 Games were Cincinnati; Dallas; Los Angeles; and Tampa, Fla. "I expect it to be a tough competition," said Dan Knise, president and chief executive of the Chesapeake Region 2012 Coalition.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2001
The Salt Lake Organizing Committee for the Olympic Winter Games and the city yesterday announced the nomination process for the Salt Lake 2002 Olympic Torch Relay, which is expected to bring the flame to Baltimore on Dec. 22. To become a torchbearer, the SLOC requires applicants to write an essay of 50 to 100 words that describes why they or their nominee should be chosen. Candidates may have inspired others to great achievement, been a source of inspiration in the community, embodied the inspirational spirit of the Olympic movement or motivated others by encountering and overcoming adversity.
SPORTS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | October 2, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - What began as a gentle childlike dream little more than two weeks ago ended in a wild party yesterday celebrating all things Australian and bracketing what have been hailed as the greatest Olympic Games of the modern era. From its fantastic start Sept. 15, when Olympic Stadium was transformed into a spectacular world of flying fish and spinning pinwheels, to the unofficial anthems "Waltzing Matilda" and "Land Down Under" that closed the Games, Sydney did its best to show the world Australia.
SPORTS
By William C. Rhoden and William C. Rhoden,New York Times News Service | September 22, 1991
Recently, a friend, discussing how rapidly changing technology has altered our concept of time, used a white-water rafting expedition he took this summer to illustrate the challenges facing managers in the 21st century.The world, he reasoned, is a raft, engulfed in a swirl of shifting events -- choppy, fast-moving rapids, tossing the raft to and fro, bombarding its navigators with a steady barrage of challenges that demand swift responses.With no luxury of long, studied analysis, managers will have to make their decisions on the spot, instinctively, intuitively.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | August 3, 1995
PASADENA, Calif. -- Swimming star Mel Stewart waltzed through the Beverly Center Mall last weekend wearing only a Speedo, which is not an everyday occurrence even in Southern California.He was doing a shoot for E!, the entertainment cable network, which recently named Stewart one of its "10 Sexiest Men in the World." Actually, he was re-creating a similar photo op that he did for his hometown newspaper in Charlotte, N.C.The two-time Olympic gold medalist apparently doesn't mind the attention.
NEWS
By John Eisenberg and John Eisenberg,SUN SPORTS COLUMNIST | September 16, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - As the opening ceremonies of the 2000 Summer Olympics were broadcast on tape on NBC last night, the Games were already splashing to a start on a crisp Saturday morning Down Under. It's amazing what a 15-hour time difference can do. A huge crowd watched female triathletes swim through Farm Cove at the foot of the Sydney Opera House and bike and sprint through the Royal Botanic Gardens, past the Art Gallery of New South Wales and under the Wooloomooloo Gate, framing an unforgettable Olympic postcard.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2000
I am as jaded as your average 45-year-old sportswriter. I have had it up to my eyeballs with athletes who aren't students, pushy parents, unscrupulous agents, manipulative coaches and the television programming executives who dictate what time the game is going to start. That said, I still haven't gotten my fill of the full-contact ballet that athletics at its highest level can deliver, so I am excited to be going to Sydney, Australia, tomorrow. This will be my first Olympics in the media pool, but I have had a long fascination with the international festival.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.