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By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2000
As all eyes turn to Sydney, local organizers working to bring the Olympic Games to this region in 2012 head to Australia for what is essentially a command performance. Over the 17 days of Games, about a dozen local representatives - including the mayors of Baltimore and Washington - will make the trek to the land 15 time zones away, to be seen, schmooze and learn how an Olympics is done firsthand. "We'll be soaking in the flavor of what it's like to experience one of these events," said Dan Knise, president and chief executive of the Washington-Baltimore Regional 2012 Coalition.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | February 17, 2014
Hannah Arendt coined the term "the banality of evil" to describe the galling normalcy of Nazi mass murderer Adolf Eichmann. Covering his trial in Jerusalem, she described Eichmann as less a cartoonish villain than a dull, remorseless, paper-pushing functionary just "doing his job. " The phrase "banality of evil" was instantly controversial, largely because it was misunderstood. Ms. Arendt was not trying to minimize Nazism's evil, but to capture its enormity. The staggering moral horror of the Holocaust was that it made complicity "normal.
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FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt | January 14, 1996
A roundup of new products and servicesAhead of The GamesIn anticipation of consumer interest in the 1996 Centennial Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta, Ga., the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games has put together a 32-page color catalog of official Olympic apparel and accessories, sporting goods and collectibles. Among the items are 14-karat gold pens, playing cards, T-shirts, posters, pennants, tote bags and foodstuff. A portion of the proceeds from every Olympic licensed item sold will help support the Atlanta committee and the U.S. Olympic Team.
BUSINESS
By Jared S. Hopkins and Lorraine Mirabella | February 13, 2014
SOCHI, Russia - In the wake of disappointing results that have seen its speedskaters on the verge of their worst Olympic performance in three decades, U.S. Speedskating may change the one factor it controls - its race suit. Under Armour heralded the Mach 39 - the much-hyped suit the apparel company developed with the help of defense contractor Lockheed Martin - as the fastest speedskating suit in production. In Sochi, U.S. speedskaters have yet to win a medal. On Thursday, U.S. Speedskating took steps to cover a meshed area on the back of the suit worn by Heather Richardson, the top-ranked women's skater in the world who finished seventh in the 1,000 meters.
NEWS
September 17, 1993
"A More Open China Awaits the 2000 Olympic Games." So say the posters and signboards all over Beijing. The slogan is a tacit admission that we have known a less open China. But this week the more open China is opening its jails to let out some political prisoners (though one remains in police sequestration after his release, if that makes sense). It's all part of the public-relations campaign by which China hopes to lure the Olympics and bolster its international prestige. The choice will be made next Thursday.
NEWS
February 19, 2013
Text of the letter: Dear Mayor: As you may know, the United States Olympic Committee is currently considering a bid for the 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games. As we explore this exciting possibility, we are actively seeking to gauge the interest of U.S. cities that may have the ability to host an event with the scope and scale of the Olympic Games. To that end, we are reaching out to cities that have previously expressed an interest in bidding as well as the cities in the largest 25 U.S. markets.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | February 12, 1994
If the United States wins its first Olympic medal in the grueling luge competition next week, a York, Pa.-based refrigeration and air-conditioning company will be sharing the glory.Since luge became an Olympic event in 1964, the Germans have dominated the sport where athletes hurtle down an icy, curved track on razor thin sleds reaching speeds of 80 mph. Until last fall, indoor luge training facilities existed only in Latvia and Germany.In October 1992, however, York International Corp., a worldwide Fortune 200 industrial refrigeration company, built a $1.2 million ultramodern, indoor practice facility at Lake Placid for the U.S. Olympic Luge team.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | July 21, 2004
DAYS OF denial done, I'm finally packing for Athens. It's really going to happen. Politics, construction delays, mismanagement, terrorism, media overkill, drug scandals: Nothing will stop these Greek Olympics. "Olympic Games," International Olympic Committee vice president Anita DeFrantz gently corrects. "My mom taught me the proper use of the phrase `Olympic' in and of itself means little, but as an adjective, speaking about the Games, it speaks about a movement and the ideals of the athletes.
SPORTS
September 19, 1990
* "This is not about money and all the stadiums we can build. It's about the values for which Olympism stands, and it shows we have learned our lessons about equality and fair play." -- Maynard Jackson, mayor of Atlanta* "I'm proud the Olympic Games will be back in the United States. We know they're going to host a terrific Olympics." -- President Bush* "We were expecting that the centenary would be for Athens, to renovate the spirit of the Games. But I think it was fair play, and we must respect the decision."
NEWS
August 4, 1996
NOT EVEN A BOMB could slow or diminish the Olympic Games in Atlanta. Professionalism, commercialism, transport problems, a hurricane and Georgia heat couldn't, either. These were the greatest Olympic Games of all time, at least until 2000.For billions of people worldwide, war, poverty, bickering and even the dismal American League East pennant race stopped while the pageantry, commercialism and pure athletic ideal of the Olympics transfixed all.From the mega-millionaires of the Dream Team to the amateurs of archery, honest competition reigned.
NEWS
By Mark Nuckols | February 6, 2014
During the past seven years, Russia has spent over $50 billion to produce what President Vladimir Putin promises will be the best winter Olympics ever. It has been estimated that as much as half or more of this money has been stolen or wasted. Also overshadowing the games, which kick off Friday in Sochi with the opening ceremony, have been various credible threats of terrorist attacks. For these and other reasons, Sochi may turn out to be a national humiliation for Russia and a political disaster for Mr. Putin himself.
NEWS
January 22, 2014
I believe the timing is right. Critical decisions should be made to keep our Olympic athletes and coaches at home. The environment is simply too volatile to send our athletes and coaches to Sochi. Russian President Vladimir Putin is bound and determined to pull off the Sochi Olympics, no matter what. But when factions boldly state they will target fans who come to Sochi, the situation becomes so much more complex and convoluted. I ask the U.S. Olympic Committee and Congress to keep our athletes stateside.
NEWS
February 19, 2013
Text of the letter: Dear Mayor: As you may know, the United States Olympic Committee is currently considering a bid for the 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games. As we explore this exciting possibility, we are actively seeking to gauge the interest of U.S. cities that may have the ability to host an event with the scope and scale of the Olympic Games. To that end, we are reaching out to cities that have previously expressed an interest in bidding as well as the cities in the largest 25 U.S. markets.
NEWS
By Pat Garofalo | August 13, 2012
Even before the 2012 London Olympics held its closing ceremonies last night, organizers and politicians were already looking ahead to the next round of bidding to host the games. Toronto is examining whether to throw its hat into the ring for the 2024 summer Olympics, and French President Francois Hollande said that Paris may consider a bid as well. According to The Sun, local businessmen and political figures are also mulling a D.C.-Baltimore bid for the 2024 Olympics. Relying on a study done in 2000 - when the region unsuccessfully bid to host these 2012 Games - supporters claim that bringing the Olympics to the region will provide an economic boost to the area of $6.7 billion (in today's dollars)
EXPLORE
August 7, 2012
The deadline for submitting sports copy is 9 a.m. on Mondays. We prefer email (howardcountysports@patuxent.com). We do not accept results by phone. When two Howard County teams play, players from both teams (first and last names) must be mentioned in the write-up. Questions? Call 410-332-6606. Jump rope Kangaroo Kids Sixteen members of the Kangaroo Kids competition team competed at the AAU Junior Olympic Games in Houston, Tex. The event featured 325 jumpers from 30 jump rope teams from the United States, Australia and Canada.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
Out-sprinted by swimmers born after she won her first gold medal in 1984, Dara Torres failed in her quest for a sixth Olympic Games Monday night. Torres, 45, of Parkland, Fl., churned down the 50-meter pool in 24.82 seconds, coming in fourth. That was 32/100ths of a second behind first-place finisher, Jessica Hardy, and a mere 9/100th of a second after Kara Lynn Joyce. Hardy, 25, and Joyce, 26, go on to compete in the 50-meter freestyle race in London. Coming in third was Christine Magnuson, also 26. A chagrined but still smiling Torres said it was an emotional and rewarding experience to attempt another Olympics.
SPORTS
May 31, 1996
Days until opening ceremonies: 49.Swimmer won't sue: Kristine Quance, disqualified for an obscure violation during the Olympic swim trials, will not sue for the chance to compete in the 400-meter individual medley at the Atlanta Games. Quance qualified for the American team in the 100 breaststroke and the 200 medley, but was disqualified in a 400 IM preliminary race during the March trials for allegedly using an illegal stroke on a turn.Call for drug-testing reform: The Olympic drug-testing system is fundamentally flawed and needs serious reform, medical experts say.Speaking at the annual meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine in Cincinnati, three internationally known authorities on Wednesday attacked the International Olympic Committee's list of banned substances for being too broad.
FEATURES
By Seattle Times | May 19, 1991
For Americans, the opportunity to combine European travel and the Olympics won't get any better than 1992, when the winter games will be held in the French Alps and the summer games in Barcelona, Spain.It will be the last year in which both the summer and winter games are staged the same year. The winter games then will move to the alternate biennials, starting in 1994 in Lillehammer, Norway. The next stop for the summer games will be in Atlanta in 1996.Both the French Alps and the Mediterranean seaport of Barcelona are tourist destinations of their own; the addition of the Olympic Games either adds to their lure or detracts from it, depending on your affinity for competition and congestion.
SPORTS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2012
Michael Phelps finished second in the 400-meter individual medley to arch-rival Ryan Lochte in the opening act of the Olympic swimming trials here Monday, but both qualified for the London Games, setting the stage for another duel over their sport's most challenging event. After a race that began with the Baltimore swimmer, Lochte and Tyler Clary grabbing the lead from one another, Lochte pulled away halfway through and stormed to a 4-minute, 7.06-second finish. Phelps pulled in .83 seconds later.
NEWS
June 5, 2012
Special Olympics Maryland will host its annual Summer Games at Towson University, June 8-10. The games include more than 1,400 athletes and 200 partners, as well as 800 volunteers who come to help run the event. Athletes compete in aquatics, athletics, bocce, cheerleading and softball. Residents are invited to join the festivities and the celebration — all events are open and free of charge. Highlights include a pep rally Friday, June 8, 5 to 7 p.m., at the university's Auburn House Pavilion, followed by an opening ceremony, 7:30-8:45 p.m., at the Towson Center.
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