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Olympic Flame

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NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 27, 1996
A HARDY CREW of Greater Severna Park residents braved the humidity last Thursday morning to greet the Olympic flame as it traveled along Ritchie Highway on its 15,000-mile trip to Atlanta for the July 19 kickoff of the 1996 Summer Games.Keith Hicks carried the torch proudly as he climbed the long incline toward the Earleigh Heights Volunteer Fire Company and on to Severna Park.The Olympic entourage included sponsor vehicles, Maryland state and county police, and featured a lone Georgia state trooper whose job was obviously to get the flame to Atlanta still burning brightly.
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NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | August 2, 2012
Mitt Romney and I are competing in a new Olympic event that involves proffering unvarnished criticism of the Olympics themselves. We're the Lochte and Phelps of this event -- appearing united when necessary and when it serves us both, and appearing divided when Mitt says something really stupid. Last week, I blamed cronyism for the awarding of the sole-source security contract for the entire Olympic Games to a company that failed to deliver, requiring the British military to step in at the last minute to pick up the slack.
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NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Frank D. Roylance and By Candus Thomson and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2001
The Winter Olympics came to Baltimore yesterday, illuminated by a flame that was passed hand to hand down busy thoroughfares and through quiet residential streets. More than 100 people did the honors, including former Oriole Cal Ripken. Some ran with the Olympic torch, some walked. But everyone carried it high. Pockets of flag-waving spectators cheered the torchbearers as they made their way from the Westside Vocational Technical Center to downtown, with the largest group of onlookers gathered at Rash Field.
SPORTS
March 1, 2010
The anti-bossy boss Candus Thomson Baltimore Sun Steve Holcomb proved that looks deceive. The roly-poly pilot of USA-1 grabbed the gold medal in four-man bobsled with the steely calm of a fighter jock, snapping a 62-year winless streak. He showed that sometimes you roll the dice and win, having experimental surgery to reverse the effects of degenerative eye disease that was robbing him of his sight. He demonstrated over the course of the year that you don't have to be bossy to be the boss.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF WRITER | January 21, 2002
Thousands of people are carrying a torch for the Olympics -- 11,500 of them. They carry it in sunshine, surrounded by cheering throngs, and in the snow and rain to the sounds of single encouraging voices. Past historic monuments. Down decaying urban streets. On sneakers, skis, skates. By dogsled, horse-drawn sleigh and covered wagon. In kayaks, military vessels and jet airplane. Some torchbearers are celebrities. Most are everyday people, nominated by friends and family and selected from 210,000 entries.
SPORTS
June 25, 1996
Food for thought: Bob Richards, who won the pole vault at the 1952 and 1956 Summer Games: "I think one reason for my dominance in the pole vault was that I drank milk. The rest of the world didn't drink milk. Think about it. The whole world was starving."More food for thought: Mark McDonald of the Dallas Morning News: "Let's hope the caldron at the Olympic Stadium, the one that will hold the Olympic flame, is a work in progress. Right now, it has a kind of Erector-set base; the caldron itself looks like a McDonald's French fries cup."
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | February 12, 1994
Today we begin an irreverent look at the Winter Olympics.THE JUDDS WON'T BE THERE, EITHER -- Today's opening ceremonies will feature reindeer, sleighs, choirs, folk dancers, etc., depicting elements of Norwegian and Lapp culture.Officials politely declined an offer from rapper Snoop Doggy Dog to serve as host.HE'S NO EVIL KNIEVEL -- Ski jumper Ole Gunnar Fidjestol, who '' crashed while practicing his leap with the Olympic flame, is reportedly considering hiring attorney Stephen L. Miles.Fidjestol claims officials were negligent in failing to warn him of the dangers of soaring off a 90-meter jump.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | February 11, 2006
Turin, Italy-- --An old Italian joke: What do you get when you cross Sophia Loren, rollerbladers with flames shooting from their helmets, The Rocky Horror Picture Show, Luciano Pavarotti, dancing trees, Yoko Ono and a couple thousand of the world's best athletes? You get the official start of the Olympic Winter Games, of course, where pomp, circumstance and nonsense overshadow any actual athletic achievement. Last night, the traditional opening ceremony remained true to Olympic pattern: overdone and simplistically naive.
SPORTS
By Dan Mihalopoulos and Dan Mihalopoulos,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 14, 2004
KOROPI, Greece - The Olympics are being contested in baking Mediterranean sunlight, but don't call these the dog days of the Greek summer. Fearful that packs of stray mutts would tarnish the country's image and threaten Olympic visitors, Greek authorities declared the dogs must disappear from the neighborhoods around the sports facilities. That elicited furious howls from many animal rights activists abroad. They complained the order was tantamount to death sentences for hordes of homeless dogs that prowled the streets, alleys and public squares of the Greek capital.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | February 13, 1994
LILLEHAMMER, Norway -- It was a day of celebration, a day of remembrance.There were Sami yodelers, Telemark skiers and Jamaican bobsledders.There were 35,000 spectators outfitted in white ponchos, like snowflakes, and Canadian athletes dressed as Mounties.There was a prince from Monaco who carried a flag and a prince from Norway who ignited a caldron.And there was the bravest man in all of Norway, the ski jumper who launched himself off a 120-meter tower with an Olympic flame in hand.This was yesterday's opening ceremony of the 17th Winter Olympics.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | February 11, 2006
Turin, Italy-- --An old Italian joke: What do you get when you cross Sophia Loren, rollerbladers with flames shooting from their helmets, The Rocky Horror Picture Show, Luciano Pavarotti, dancing trees, Yoko Ono and a couple thousand of the world's best athletes? You get the official start of the Olympic Winter Games, of course, where pomp, circumstance and nonsense overshadow any actual athletic achievement. Last night, the traditional opening ceremony remained true to Olympic pattern: overdone and simplistically naive.
SPORTS
By Dan Mihalopoulos and Dan Mihalopoulos,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 14, 2004
KOROPI, Greece - The Olympics are being contested in baking Mediterranean sunlight, but don't call these the dog days of the Greek summer. Fearful that packs of stray mutts would tarnish the country's image and threaten Olympic visitors, Greek authorities declared the dogs must disappear from the neighborhoods around the sports facilities. That elicited furious howls from many animal rights activists abroad. They complained the order was tantamount to death sentences for hordes of homeless dogs that prowled the streets, alleys and public squares of the Greek capital.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF WRITER | January 21, 2002
Thousands of people are carrying a torch for the Olympics -- 11,500 of them. They carry it in sunshine, surrounded by cheering throngs, and in the snow and rain to the sounds of single encouraging voices. Past historic monuments. Down decaying urban streets. On sneakers, skis, skates. By dogsled, horse-drawn sleigh and covered wagon. In kayaks, military vessels and jet airplane. Some torchbearers are celebrities. Most are everyday people, nominated by friends and family and selected from 210,000 entries.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Frank D. Roylance and By Candus Thomson and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2001
The Winter Olympics came to Baltimore yesterday, illuminated by a flame that was passed hand to hand down busy thoroughfares and through quiet residential streets. More than 100 people did the honors, including former Oriole Cal Ripken. Some ran with the Olympic torch, some walked. But everyone carried it high. Pockets of flag-waving spectators cheered the torchbearers as they made their way from the Westside Vocational Technical Center to downtown, with the largest group of onlookers gathered at Rash Field.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2001
Since the day last year that she learned she had cancer, Kristen Adelman has been in training, keeping her muscles healthy, maintaining her faith in God, watching her diet, putting one foot in front of the other. As a triathlete, it is her winning formula, her reservoir of strength. As a patient, the regimen has sustained her through rounds of chemotherapy and radiation treatments and a stem cell transplant. It is what she believes will get her through a bone marrow transplant two weeks from now. But tomorrow the sixth-grade teacher from Elkridge will participate in a highly visible, deeply unorthodox treatment.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2001
The organizers of next year's Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City had a worst-case scenario in mind as they built a $200 million blueprint for security. On Tuesday, their worst-case got worse. Olympic officials yesterday expressed confidence that the Games will not be canceled next February because of the attacks in New York and Washington, but acknowledged they will have to put more muscle in their plan to meet the threat of terrorism. "I do believe the Games should not have a militaristic look.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1996
Outside an auto body shop on the west side of Elkton, a 27-year-old program director for the local YMCA had his moment in the sun -- had there been any.At 3: 18 p.m., Andy Dearing held the Olympic flame. Bystanders cheered and cameras clicked as he lifted his torch and trotted down the street. Children ran with him. Police on motorcycles provided an official escort.Three minutes later, it was over. After lighting the next runner's torch, his bright orange flame was doused, and he could only marvel at his brush with athletic history.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,SUN COLUMNIST | July 21, 1996
ATLANTA -- It was the rarest of Olympic moments, a moment of infinite sadness, yet supreme majesty. You didn't know whether to cheer or to cry. All you could do was watch and root once more for Muhammad Ali.He appeared like an apparition under the Olympic caldron, and just like that took the world back into his hands. Except this time, those once-mighty hands were shaking, with Parkinson's disease proving a more difficult opponent than Joe Frazier.And now, Ali had to light the Olympic flame.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1997
Keith Rosenberg and Paul Levy want to bring the summer Olympic Games to Baltimore in 2008.Ha, you say. And your mother's the Queen of England.But watch these two Maryland attorneys go. Watch them count railroad ties and airplanes. Crunch numbers. Collect data. Cold call Maryland Stadium Authority chairman John Moag with their bright idea.Fat chance.Wait. Moag doesn't hang up on them. He likes these guys. He likes their pluck.Inspired by the Atlanta-Billy Payne model of how to hold the Olympics in your hometown, plenty of Maryland folks have approached Moag with the same idea.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,SUN COLUMNIST | July 21, 1996
ATLANTA -- It was the rarest of Olympic moments, a moment of infinite sadness, yet supreme majesty. You didn't know whether to cheer or to cry. All you could do was watch and root once more for Muhammad Ali.He appeared like an apparition under the Olympic caldron, and just like that took the world back into his hands. Except this time, those once-mighty hands were shaking, with Parkinson's disease proving a more difficult opponent than Joe Frazier.And now, Ali had to light the Olympic flame.
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