Advertisement
HomeCollectionsOlympia
IN THE NEWS

Olympia

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | August 19, 2004
OLYMPIA, Greece -- Take away the spandex and the occasional megaphone to hustle along spectators. Take away the bottled water, the sunscreen, the Nike sneakers, the cell phones and the soldiers with automatic rifles patrolling the ruins. Instead, think nude athletes preening in oil-slicked grandeur, think the stink of unbathed masses and heavy smoke from cook stoves circling the raucous valley. Think chariot races. Think brutal, bloody and all-or-nothing fights instead of fraternal mingling of competitors vying for gold, silver and bronze.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
Olympia J. Snowe, the former Republican senator from Maine, has joined T. Rowe Price Group's board of directors, the Baltimore-based money manager announced Thursday. Snowe served in the House of Representatives from 1979 to 1995, when she started representing Maine in the Senate until this year. She now is chairman and CEO of a policy and communications consulting firm and a senior fellow at the Bipartisan Policy Center, Price said. As part of her compensation, Snowe received 4,200 restricted shares that vest a year from now. Price independent directors' compensation includes a $75,000 annual retainer, $1,500 per meeting, and thousands of dollars for heading up a committee.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2003
OLYMPIA FIELDS, Ill. - There are no breathtaking views of the Pacific Ocean, as there were at Pebble Beach in 2000. There is no talk of this being "The People's Open," as there was last year when the U.S. Open was played on Bethpage Black, the monstrous public course on Long Island. There seems to be a decided lack of buzz about this year's national championship, which begins this morning at Olympia Fields, an 80-year-old club 35 miles south of Chicago. It doesn't help that Tiger Woods, the 103rd Open's defending champion, comes in amid some of his most lackluster play in four years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | October 21, 2004
Hometown: Baltimore (by way of Olympia, Wash.) Current members: Christon K., bass, guitar, vocals, programming; and Maria Geisberg; guitar, programming, vocals. Founded in: January 2000. Style: Loud rock Influenced by: Sonic Youth, '80s metal Notable: Both band members are from Baltimore, but they started the jaded set out of Olympia, Wash. After a year of wet weather and disappointment with the music scene there, they came back here. Quotable: Christon K. on their style: "Some of the stuff is hard dance music, some is experimental noise."
FEATURES
By Mike Nichols and Mike Nichols,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | July 7, 1996
"Plodding wins the race."-- AesopIn Olympia, Greece, the temptation is natural: To run past the judges' stand and imagine being crowned with the olive wreath of victory as spectators (including, perhaps, Plato or Diogenes or Herodotus) roar their approval.Children readily succumb to the urge, crouching at the stone starting line and then bolting down the track. Amid tumbled columns and roofless walls, in the ruins of the stadium where it all began, they are running literally in the footsteps of ancient Olympians.
NEWS
July 12, 1994
* Alexandra Dukakis, 92, mother of Academy Award-winning actress Olympia Dukakis, died Saturday in Montclair, N.J. She sang with the Arlington Philharmonic in Massachusetts for 20 years before moving to New Jersey in 1976, where she was active in the Whole Theater Company in Montclair. Her daughter, Olympia, won an Oscar in 1987 as best supporting actress in the film "Moonstruck."
FEATURES
By MICHAEL & JANE STERN and MICHAEL & JANE STERN,Universal Press Syndicate | February 17, 1991
OLYMPIA, Wash. -- Oysters from the beds of Puget Sound have been an exalted Northwest delicacy since the 1850s, when San Francisco gourmets paid $20 a plate to eat them. The best-known ones are Olympic oysters, critters too small to be enjoyed on the half-shell, customarily served already shucked in a big glass bowl so that you can gobble up dozens at a time.One of the most famous ways to eat "Olys" is in an omelet called a Hangtown fry. Served up and down the West Coast, and even in some fancier kitchens in other parts of the country, a Hangtown fry enfolds a couple of handfuls of oysters that have been quickly fried to crusty succulence, and is usually garnished with a few strips of crisp bacon.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 8, 2003
The Olympia Pizzeria has been around for many years, firmly implanting itself in the commercial life of the York Road corridor in Lutherville. There is nothing fancy about what happens there, but the Olympia long ago mastered the craft of quick, competent carryout. Photographs on the wall depict some of the many kids' softball and soccer teams the restaurant has sponsored over the years. There are also fun pictures of Grecian scenes and a nude Greek statue, as well as a nice collection of Olympics posters in the back.
NEWS
August 6, 1993
Just as we finished celebrating the opening later this summer of a brand-new diner in Pasadena (Ritchie Highway and Mountain Road) more good news arrived: Early next year there will be a new-old diner opening up in nearby Jessup (U.S. 1 at Cedar Avenue). Taking the family out to one of these old-fashioned eateries is becoming the "in" thing to do.Frank's Diner is coming to town. Nostalgia buffs will love the place, especially if they fondly remember the heydays of diners during the 1950s -- or wish to learn what they were like.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | October 21, 2004
Hometown: Baltimore (by way of Olympia, Wash.) Current members: Christon K., bass, guitar, vocals, programming; and Maria Geisberg; guitar, programming, vocals. Founded in: January 2000. Style: Loud rock Influenced by: Sonic Youth, '80s metal Notable: Both band members are from Baltimore, but they started the jaded set out of Olympia, Wash. After a year of wet weather and disappointment with the music scene there, they came back here. Quotable: Christon K. on their style: "Some of the stuff is hard dance music, some is experimental noise."
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | August 31, 2004
ATHENS - So I fly from Baltimore 5,000 miles to Athens, trundle another 180 miles by bus to Olympia to watch the Olympics return to its birthplace, and what do I find? A Baltimore angle. A Baltimore story good enough to upstage the shot put - a once-in-a-lifetime event in the most hallowed grounds, considering that Olympia is where sports was born. Besides Baltimore, that is. Baltimore tends to pride itself as the center of the sports universe. Babe Ruth, Johnny Unitas, Cal Ripken - there are only one or two degrees of separation between Baltimore and every important sports story in America.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | August 19, 2004
OLYMPIA, Greece -- Take away the spandex and the occasional megaphone to hustle along spectators. Take away the bottled water, the sunscreen, the Nike sneakers, the cell phones and the soldiers with automatic rifles patrolling the ruins. Instead, think nude athletes preening in oil-slicked grandeur, think the stink of unbathed masses and heavy smoke from cook stoves circling the raucous valley. Think chariot races. Think brutal, bloody and all-or-nothing fights instead of fraternal mingling of competitors vying for gold, silver and bronze.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2003
Ask Me Again Tomorrow, by Olympia Dukakis, with Emily Heckman. HarperCollins. 224 pages. $25.95. In her 40-year career as an actress, Olympia Dukakis has earned heavyweight status on stage and screen. She has appeared in more than 150 theater productions, many of which she directed, and won 21 awards for her work on-stage. For her breakthrough role as a fiesty Italian mother in the 1988 film Moonstruck, she won an Academy Award. In her most recent role as an author, however, Dukakis has delivered a disappointingly mediocre performance.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2003
OLYMPIA FIELDS, Ill. - There are no breathtaking views of the Pacific Ocean, as there were at Pebble Beach in 2000. There is no talk of this being "The People's Open," as there was last year when the U.S. Open was played on Bethpage Black, the monstrous public course on Long Island. There seems to be a decided lack of buzz about this year's national championship, which begins this morning at Olympia Fields, an 80-year-old club 35 miles south of Chicago. It doesn't help that Tiger Woods, the 103rd Open's defending champion, comes in amid some of his most lackluster play in four years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jean Thompson and By Jean Thompson,Sun Staff | January 19, 2003
Eden, by Olympia Vernon. 272 pages, Grove Press, $23 Maddy Dangerfield is 14. She is black skin and red Mississippi clay and a tube of crimson lipstick. In dirt-poor Pyke County, where a hog slaughtering can attract spectators, Maddy's understanding of birth, life and death is a quilt of rural commonsense, family secrets, old wives' tales and Biblical admonitions. Eden captures Maddy's season of hormonal hell. She scandalizes her church, and finds herself packed off to nurse an aunt whose life of sin has been cut short by breast cancer.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 8, 2003
The Olympia Pizzeria has been around for many years, firmly implanting itself in the commercial life of the York Road corridor in Lutherville. There is nothing fancy about what happens there, but the Olympia long ago mastered the craft of quick, competent carryout. Photographs on the wall depict some of the many kids' softball and soccer teams the restaurant has sponsored over the years. There are also fun pictures of Grecian scenes and a nude Greek statue, as well as a nice collection of Olympics posters in the back.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | August 31, 2004
ATHENS - So I fly from Baltimore 5,000 miles to Athens, trundle another 180 miles by bus to Olympia to watch the Olympics return to its birthplace, and what do I find? A Baltimore angle. A Baltimore story good enough to upstage the shot put - a once-in-a-lifetime event in the most hallowed grounds, considering that Olympia is where sports was born. Besides Baltimore, that is. Baltimore tends to pride itself as the center of the sports universe. Babe Ruth, Johnny Unitas, Cal Ripken - there are only one or two degrees of separation between Baltimore and every important sports story in America.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1992
BG&E seeks to cut electric rateThe Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. requested approval from the Maryland Public Service Commission yesterday to reduce its electric fuel rate by 5.3 percent effective Oct. 1, cutting $22 million off ratepayers' annual bills.The proposed reduction would cut 55 cents off the monthly bill for the average customer using 600 kilowatt hours of electricity. The fuel rate is the portion of a utility bill that allows the company to pass on to customers changes in fuel costs -- which makes up zTC about 25 percent of a utility bill.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 8, 2002
Foreign-language classes are so filled with good-natured miscommunication, they're an ideal setting for comedy-drama - and in Italian for Beginners, writer-director Lone Scherfig adds the delicious incongruity of a bunch of depressed Danes learning the ebullient tongue of Italian. As the classroom becomes a vaudeville hall, she sets the stage for humor that's effortless and blissfully humane. Even the simplest subtitles seem funny when these brooders adopt a Mediterranean lilt. Near the start, a pastor asks a church worker whether she's married.
ENTERTAINMENT
By VICTORIA BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 30, 2000
From deep in the dark midwinter burst forth the succulent buds of five marvelous new novels. Unable to afford that trip to Elsewhere as winds howl, snow billows and the flesh runs cold from dreams unrealized? Tuck in with one of these and be, as Emily Dickinson charged, taken miles away. A. L. Kennedy isn't a name well-known to Americans, few of whom could name a Scottish writer other than Robert Burns. Hers is a startlingly flesh and richly nuanced voice. In "So I Am Glad" (Knopf, 280 pages, $23)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.