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NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2010
Kaye White of Bloomington, Minn., was looking for the recipe for the Crab Imperial that was served at the now-closed Olney Inn in Olney. Interestingly, I received two versions claiming to be the Olney Inn crab imperial recipe from readers. The only difference between the two versions was that in one the crab was topped with an egg white and mayonnaise meringue and garnished with a mashed potato piping around the outside of the dish. The crab imperial itself was identical in both versions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2010
The ring tone that breaks out periodically from the missionary's cell phone says a lot: The theme from "Mission: Impossible." But this bubbly blond evangelical named Melissa is nothing if not determined, and her targets — two sisters sharing a home and a lifelong commitment to Catholicism — present an irresistible challenge. Such is the premise of Evan Smith's smart, snappy comedy, "The Savannah Disputation," receiving its area premiere in a finely nuanced production from the Olney Theatre Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
"It is so easy to convert others," Oscar Wilde observed. "It is so difficult to convert oneself." Something of both attempts is at the heart of "The Savannah Disputation," the comedy by Evan Smith receiving its area premiere at the Olney Theatre this week. The play, which had a successful production in New York last year, grabs a subject many people shy away from discussing — religion — and runs with it, finding humor as the dogma flies. Anyone who has ever answered a knock at the door to find an eager evangelical will, perhaps with a shiver, recognize the plot's set-up: Mary and Margaret, two sisters living together in Savannah, Ga., and content with their Catholic faith, find their lives put off balance when a Pentecostal missionary named Melissa shows up at their house, hell-bent on saving their souls.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
Sandy Spring Bancorp said Thursday it turned a $6.2 million profit in the second quarter, the result of its efforts to reduce problem loans during the past few quarters. On a per-share basis, the Olney-based bank holding company earned 26 cents per share for the quarter. A year earlier, Sandy Spring lost $280,000, or 2 cents per share. Additionally, the company said it repaid half of the $83 million it received in 2008 from the government's Troubled Asset Relief Program. During the second quarter, the bank reduced the amount of money set aside for losses to $6.1 million, down from $10.6 million a year earlier.
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2010
The persistent folly of us mortals when it comes to pursuing romance or power (or both) has provided abundant fuel for any number of theatrical works over the centuries. Among the entertaining examples is an early 18th-century play, Pierre Marivaux's "The Triumph of Love," sparked with cross-gender disguises and sexual-political complications. That piece found its way into our own time and place, thanks to a much-admired translation by James Magruder that was produced in 1993 at Center Stage, where he was dramaturg.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley | March 19, 2009
The world premiere of The Soul Collector has the makings to be an offbeat delight. The surreal comedy is not only written by David Emerson Toney, who has been a fixture for years in Washington as an actor, playwright and screenwriter, but it also marks a bold step forward for Everyman Theatre, which until now has specialized in previously produced plays with a track record of success. Vincent Lancisi, Everyman's artistic director, has described Toney as "a new and vibrant voice in American theater" and says he's eager to introduce Baltimore audiences to his work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | February 19, 2009
Mark Twain's sadness and worries about money are all right there - hidden under the cross-dressing plot that puts a cigar-chomping gent in hoop skirts and hair bows, beneath the satirical swipes at the French, the art world and Limburger cheese. Is He Dead?, a recently discovered 1898 comedy by the great humorist and adapted by David Ives, has all the sparkle and brilliance of a shooting star. But it leaves behind a trail of dust, stones and space debris. In the farce, currently receiving a solid production at Olney Theatre Center, Twain cheekily placed a beloved, recent painter, Jean Francois Millet, in stage center.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2008
theater 'Peter Pan - the Musical': What a concept - in this production, the boy who won't grow up is actually played by someone with a Y chromosome. ("Peter" traditionally has been portrayed by a woman.) The nontraditional casting meant that some songs had to be reorchestrated. Through Jan. 4 at Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Drive, Olney. Showtimes vary. Tickets are $25-$48. Call 301-924-3400 or go to olneytheatre.org. Mary CaroleMcCauley design Bike racks: Why do bike racks have to be boring?
ENTERTAINMENT
By [ISHITA SINGH] | June 12, 2008
FESTIVAL CELEBRATE HONS! PUT ON YOUR LEOPARD-PRINT spandex and best beehive hairdo and head to Hampden this weekend, hon! The annual Honfest, a "Bawlmer" tradition, is back with food, music and, of course, the best hons in the city. The festival showcases cat-eye glasses, bright makeup and hair -- the higher, the better -- in a celebration of the women of the '60s. Proceeds from the festival will go to Project 12, a nonprofit organization aimed at decreasing the high school dropout rate in Baltimore.
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