Advertisement
HomeCollectionsOlney Theatre
IN THE NEWS

Olney Theatre

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2010
The persistent folly of us mortals when it comes to pursuing romance or power (or both) has provided abundant fuel for any number of theatrical works over the centuries. Among the entertaining examples is an early 18th-century play, Pierre Marivaux's "The Triumph of Love," sparked with cross-gender disguises and sexual-political complications. That piece found its way into our own time and place, thanks to a much-admired translation by James Magruder that was produced in 1993 at Center Stage, where he was dramaturg.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
UPDATE: The run has just been extended through Sept. 8. With a fresh story angle and imaginative songs, “A Chorus Line” created one singular sensation on Broadway back in 1975. The musical, which chalked up a slew of Tonys and the Pulitzer Prize, enjoyed a record-breaking 15-year run that would stand uncontested until some singing felines came along. As an energetic, mostly persuasive revival at Olney Theatre Center reconfirms, the slice-of-theater-life scenario of the show still clicks, often affectingly.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 1, 2001
`Bye Bye Birdie' opens Olney Theatre season Olney Theatre Center opens its 2001 season tomorrow with "Bye Bye Birdie," the 1961 Adams and Strouse musical about a rock and roll star and his effect on the teens in small-town America. Continuing the practice instituted two seasons ago, the season opener showcases young musical-theater performers from the Washington area. Here's the rest of the Olney main-stage season: "The Rivals," by Richard Brinsley Sheridan (April 17-May 20); "Art," by Yasmina Reza (June 5-July 8)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
Even in our LED age, there is still something deliciously spooky about the sight of gas jets getting fainter, for no apparent reason, inside the glass lamps of a lush Victorian parlor. It's the unforgettable visual motif many a movie fan will always associate with “Gaslight,” the 1944 hit that won Ingrid Bergman an Academy Award as a pitiful wife being slowly driven insane by her husband - mysterious dimming had a lot to do with it. The inspiration for that film, Patrick Hamilton's sturdy little thriller “Angel Street,” doesn't enjoy quite as much fame these days, which makes the play's handsome revival by the Olney Theatre Center all the more welcome.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff Writer | March 20, 1994
Olney Theatre's summer season will include the area premiere of "Hot 'n' Cole," a new revue of the music of Cole Porter; the revival of Horton Foote's "The Trip to Bountiful" and the revival of Tennessee Williams' "The Night of the Iguana," the theater has announced. The season will begin May 3 and run through Oct. 23."Hot 'n' Cole," a production with more than 50 Cole Porter songs, will run May 3-29. "The Trip to Bountiful," the story of a widow's pilgrimage to her native hamlet, will run June 7-July 3. "A Small Family Business," a farce by Alan Ayckbourn that concerns a principled man modifying his ethics, will run July 12-Aug.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | October 10, 1993
For the first time in its history, Olney Theatre will produce a winter season of plays, including a world premiere and an off-Broadway drama. The plays and their dates follow:"For Reasons That Remain Unclear," a new play by Mart Crowley, author of "The Boys in the Band," concerns a confrontation between two men over a traumatic episode in their past. It runs Nov. 9-28 with actors Philip Anglim and Ken Ruta."Holiday Memories," a play adapted from two Truman Capote short stories about his childhood in rural Alabama, runs Dec. 7-26.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Reporter | June 21, 2007
Jim Petosa, who shepherded a troupe of actors from a summer theater to a regional company with a $5.2 million budget, has announced that he will step down as artistic director of the Olney Theatre Center. But he's not leaving until December 2008 and, even then, will remain on the board of directors. For years, Petosa has divided his responsibilities between Olney and Boston University, where he heads the theater program. "My life in Boston has been getting more and more complicated," Petosa said yesterday.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | June 8, 1993
In George M. Cohan's "The Tavern," a young woman repeatedly refers to the main character as "quaint." The description doesn't really fit the flamboyant character, but it definitely fits this 1920 script, which is so hopelessly quaint, it's practically creaky.In fact, Cohan's chestnut has become such a staple of summer stock that seeing it at Olney Theatre is almost a cliche. This is not to say that Olney doesn't do a good job with it. To the contrary, from designer Thomas F. Donahue's rough-hewn tavern set -- complete with a bevy of mounted animal heads -- to the slightly satirical tone of Bill Graham Jr.'s direction, this "Tavern" in Olney is a most pleasant place to visit.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | July 19, 1994
The biggest laugh in Olney Theatre's production of Alan Ayckbourn's "A Small Family Business" comes in the opening scene. The family of a British businessman named Jack McCracken is giving him a surprise party to celebrate his quitting his old job to run the family business.While his large, extended family waits in the living room to surprise him, Jack arrives home with something altogether different in mind. Determined to make love to his wife, he has undressed down to his drawers and is babbling lasciviously when he chases her into the living room.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 30, 1996
George Bernard Shaw's "Mrs. Warren's Profession" doesn't shock anymore -- and that's the most shocking thing of all.Shaw dubbed "Mrs. Warren's Profession" one of his "plays unpleasant," but as Olney Theatre Center's solid production proves, far from being unpleasant, it now seems mild -- even quaint.At the turn of the century, when Shaw wrote this play about the world's oldest profession, the censors went wild. With the exception of a private performance in 1902, the play wasn't produced in London until 1925.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2010
The ring tone that breaks out periodically from the missionary's cell phone says a lot: The theme from "Mission: Impossible." But this bubbly blond evangelical named Melissa is nothing if not determined, and her targets — two sisters sharing a home and a lifelong commitment to Catholicism — present an irresistible challenge. Such is the premise of Evan Smith's smart, snappy comedy, "The Savannah Disputation," receiving its area premiere in a finely nuanced production from the Olney Theatre Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
"It is so easy to convert others," Oscar Wilde observed. "It is so difficult to convert oneself. " Something of both attempts is at the heart of "The Savannah Disputation," the comedy by Evan Smith receiving its area premiere at the Olney Theatre this week. The play, which had a successful production in New York last year, grabs a subject many people shy away from discussing — religion — and runs with it, finding humor as the dogma flies. Anyone who has ever answered a knock at the door to find an eager evangelical will, perhaps with a shiver, recognize the plot's set-up: Mary and Margaret, two sisters living together in Savannah, Ga., and content with their Catholic faith, find their lives put off balance when a Pentecostal missionary named Melissa shows up at their house, hell-bent on saving their souls.
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2010
The persistent folly of us mortals when it comes to pursuing romance or power (or both) has provided abundant fuel for any number of theatrical works over the centuries. Among the entertaining examples is an early 18th-century play, Pierre Marivaux's "The Triumph of Love," sparked with cross-gender disguises and sexual-political complications. That piece found its way into our own time and place, thanks to a much-admired translation by James Magruder that was produced in 1993 at Center Stage, where he was dramaturg.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | November 25, 2009
When Amanda Yuan of Clarksville was 3 years old, she would often hide under the tables at preschool, too shy to play with the other kids. Her parents decided to get her involved in anything that would bolster her social skills, and signed her up at a drama learning center. Now, you would never know that the 11-year-old budding actress ever struggled to assert herself . On Thursday, she will be one of the youngest among a group of child performers - including three from Maryland - to take part in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade finale in New York City.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | February 19, 2009
Mark Twain's sadness and worries about money are all right there - hidden under the cross-dressing plot that puts a cigar-chomping gent in hoop skirts and hair bows, beneath the satirical swipes at the French, the art world and Limburger cheese. Is He Dead?, a recently discovered 1898 comedy by the great humorist and adapted by David Ives, has all the sparkle and brilliance of a shooting star. But it leaves behind a trail of dust, stones and space debris. In the farce, currently receiving a solid production at Olney Theatre Center, Twain cheekily placed a beloved, recent painter, Jean Francois Millet, in stage center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Swift | November 23, 2008
TV 'Dancing with the Stars': You may be ashamed to admit it, but judging from the ratings, someone's watching this hokey hoedown. Look for a three-way race among former boy-band singer Lance Bass (above), retired NFL star Warren Sapp and E! channel eye-candy Brooke Burke. The final performances air at 8 p.m. tomorrow, and the winner is crowned at 9 p.m. Tuesday on WMAR, Channel 2. BOOKS 'Panic: The Story : : of Modern Financial Insanity: ': In his latest book, Michael Lewis explores the roots and ruin of five recent financial debacles - including our current one. While Lewis gives the requisite history lesson, he also gives us a glimpse of what the talking heads were saying in the heat of the crisis.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2003
Outdoor theater often includes annoyances like bugs attacking the actors as they sweat in the summer heat and children running around on the grass during a play. But members of the Olney Theatre Center's annual Summer Shakespeare group still say performing without walls makes for great theater. "Because it is on a larger scale outdoors, it is really exciting to see what happens," said Benjamin Sands, 21, an actor from Cincinnati who is with the Olney group this summer. Audiences can see the company's production of Amadeus - a departure from its usual focus on Shakespeare - amid the rolling hills and 200-year-old trees of the Glenelg Country School in western Howard County at 8 p.m. today through Sunday.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 21, 1999
"The world of the theater is as closed a tribe and as removed from other civilian worlds as a Gypsy encampment, and those who enter it are spoiled for anything else and are tainted with its insidious lure for the rest of their lives," wrote playwright Moss Hart in his memoir, "Act One."Hart gave theatergoers a rollicking, warm-hearted glimpse of that alluring world in his 1948 comedy, "Light Up the Sky," which is receiving a glowing production at Olney Theatre Center under the sure-handed direction of John Going.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.