Advertisement
HomeCollectionsOlney
IN THE NEWS

Olney

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 27, 2005
On February 24, 2005, ESTHER K.beloved wife of the late Willis G. Olney, devoted mother of Glenn, Alan and Amy Olney, dear sister of August Kulick. Loving grandmother of Summer Olney Friends may call at THE JOHNSON FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 8521 Loch Raven Blvd., (Beltway Exit 29B), on Sunday 6 to 9 P.M. where family and friends are invited attend funeral services Monday 10 A.M. Interment Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens. Donations may be made in her memory to The Oak Crest Village Benevolent Fund, 8820 Walther Blvd.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By David Selig and The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
We already knew that Adam Jones was the Orioles' undisputed king of Twitter, but now he can add ESPN.com blogger to his digital resume. With Buster Olney taking vacation this week -- or at least as much of a vacation you can take as a baseball writer in the summer -- the Orioles center fielder was his fill-in today on ESPN's popular "Buster Olney Blog. " (You need an Insider account for full access.) Jones' headline was "When Baseball Changed in Baltimore," which he explains was Aug. 3, 2010, the day Buck Showalter was hired as manager.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | August 20, 1991
Don't be put off by the first 10 minutes of the Olney Theater production of ''The Elephant Man.'' For that much time, the presentation is loud and threatening, often a sign that we are in for more noise than entertainment.But, fortunately, the volume comes down. The yelling ends as quickly as it begins, and once it's over, this particular ''Elephant Man'' is a commendable interpretation of a most interesting play.The script has its faults. In the second act, Sir Frederick Treves, the surgeon who rescues the title character from life as a sideshow attraction, goes on and on and says very little.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
UPDATE: The run has just been extended through Sept. 8. With a fresh story angle and imaginative songs, “A Chorus Line” created one singular sensation on Broadway back in 1975. The musical, which chalked up a slew of Tonys and the Pulitzer Prize, enjoyed a record-breaking 15-year run that would stand uncontested until some singing felines came along. As an energetic, mostly persuasive revival at Olney Theatre Center reconfirms, the slice-of-theater-life scenario of the show still clicks, often affectingly.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | October 7, 1993
Olney Theatre hasn't had a lot of luck with new musicals in recent years. Last year's "Wuthering Heights" was more like "Withering Heights"; 1990's "Dennis the Menace" proved that even on stage a comic-strip character can remain two-dimensional; and as to 1989's "Lucky Stiff," well, it's difficult to do a musical in which one of the lead characters is a corpse.Creating a musical in which the protagonist is a bedridden invalid might not seem like a much better idea.But in "Show Me Where the Good Times Are," Olney has found the nice, little musical that reverses the trend.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | May 4, 1992
Olney--In "Prelude to a Kiss," Craig Lucas tests the limits of the marriage vow: "In sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, till death us do part." But the play is more than a romantic tear-jerker; it's an amusingly inventive look at the larger question: How well can you truly know the person you marry -- or, for that matter, how well can you ever know another person?Lucas presents these issues in a manner that is as quirky as it is fascinating. However, at Olney Theatre, where "Prelude" is receiving its area premiere, director Jim Petosa stretches the limits of quirkiness and detracts from the fascination.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Correspondent | August 20, 1991
OLNEY -- Bernard Pomerance's "The Elephant Man" is a beautiful account of an ugly man. Most of the play takes place in a hospital, but it is concerned more with healing the spirit than healing the body.From the opening plaintive cello strains that usher in Olney Theatre's production, the beautiful and ugly, spiritual and corporeal come together in this sensitive interpretation, directed Jim Petosa and highlighted by Bruce R. Nelson's riveting performance in the title role.Much of the script's genius is that it uses the details of the life of John Merrick -- a 19th century Englishman grossly disfigured by what is now believed to have been either neurofibromatosis or Proteus Syndrome -- to examine not only the distinction between internal and external beauty, but also such issues as the conflict between science and religion, the motivations behind charity and the quality of human nature.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | June 20, 1995
Watching "Jacques Brel Is Alive and Well and Living in Paris" at Olney Theatre Center, I was reminded of a quote by Mark Twain, which I paraphrase: It's un-American, it's un-English . . . it's French.Brel was Belgian, to be precise, but he wrote in French, and Americans -- except for his devoted cult following -- are apt to find his percussive, cynical songs about loneliness, death, lost love and war an acquired taste. In the late 1960s, however, his songs experienced a peak in popularity in this country when Eric Blau and Mort Shuman created the revue "Jacques Brel is Alive and Well, etc.," which ran for four years off-Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | December 16, 1994
"There's nothing better than a good old-fashioned exercise for your imagination," the Fairy Godmother says at the beginning of Rodgers and Hammerstein's "Cinderella." Director Mark Waldrop has taken that advice to heart in Olney Theatre's delightfully imaginative production.Near the start of the show, Deb G. Girdler, as the Fairy Godmother, inserts a large gold key into a stained-glass box on one side of the stage. When the key starts turning, the rest of the cast jolts into action, like figurines in a music box. But though the actors move like mechanical toys during the overture, there's nothing mechanical about the rest of this charming show.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 26, 2004
Unlike a carousel, which revolves repeatedly in place, one of the messages of Rodgers and Hammerstein's 1945 musical, Carousel, is that what goes around doesn't necessarily have to come around. Bad patterns can be broken. This gratifying realization is one of several rewarding aspects of Olney Theatre Center's lilting but thoughtful, solid production. Over the years, the musicals of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II have gained an undeserved reputation for sugariness. The 1956 Shirley Jones-Gordon MacRae movie version of Carousel helped reinforce this reputation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
Even in our LED age, there is still something deliciously spooky about the sight of gas jets getting fainter, for no apparent reason, inside the glass lamps of a lush Victorian parlor. It's the unforgettable visual motif many a movie fan will always associate with “Gaslight,” the 1944 hit that won Ingrid Bergman an Academy Award as a pitiful wife being slowly driven insane by her husband - mysterious dimming had a lot to do with it. The inspiration for that film, Patrick Hamilton's sturdy little thriller “Angel Street,” doesn't enjoy quite as much fame these days, which makes the play's handsome revival by the Olney Theatre Center all the more welcome.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | March 26, 2013
Not many national baseball analysts are picking the Orioles to return to the playoffs, let alone finish first in the big, bad A.L. East this season. But one prominent MLB reporter believes the Orioles will take the division. “I'm picking the Baltimore Orioles to win,” ESPN's Buster Olney said on his "Baseball Tonight" podcast . Olney, once an Orioles scribe here at The Baltimore Sun , pointed to the team's pitching depth as one of the main reasons why he likes their chances.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2011
Sandy Spring Bancorp, an Olney-based banking company, said Tuesday it will buy CommerceFirst Bancorp of Annapolis in a cash and stock deal valued at $25.4 million. Both Sandy Spring, which has $3.6 billion in assets, and CommerceFirst, with $205 million in assets, trade on the Nasdaq stock market. CommerceFirst shareholders will be allowed to choose Sandy Spring common stock or cash, or a combination of both, the companies said. The transaction is expected to close in the second quarter of 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2011
John Lindner reviews Urban Bar-B-Que in Sandy Spring. That's near Olney, looks like. See if Lindner thinks this barbecue restaurant, the third in a group that also has locaitons in Silver Spring and Rockville, is worth the drive.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2011
The easiest part of forming a string quartet may be finding four good musicians. Much trickier is finding players who can get along with one another, on- and offstage. Michael Hollinger's absorbing and often funny 2006 play "Opus," which has been given a taut production at the Olney Theatre Center, examines a fictional ensemble from the inside out. The Lazara Quartet is in crisis mode as the work opens. The original violist, Dorian, has been fired by the other members, and there isn't much time to regroup before a televised concert at the White House.
SPORTS
June 8, 2011
Here at Baltimore Sports Blitz, it’s all Bundy, all the time. Well, at least for the rest of the week. But I’m sure you don’t mind me passing along more information on Orioles first-round draft pick Dylan Bundy, a high school pitcher out of Oklahoma that ESPN’s Buster Olney believes was the best prospect in the 2011 draft. “In the eyes of a lot of the scouting directors and general managers around baseball, the best player in the draft was Dylan Bundy,” Olney said in an appearance on “The Scott Van Pelt Show” on Wednesday . “I had one general manager actually say to me that Dylan Bundy, in his eyes, is the best pitching prospect that he has ever seen,” Olney said.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | September 14, 1995
Near the end of "The Best of Friends," one of the play's three characters says: "I declare friendship to be the most precious thing in life." It would be difficult to come up with firmer, more heartwarming proof than this epistolary drama by Hugh Whitemore.Olney Theatre Center got what might have been considered a bad break with this play. Undoubtedly the theater wasn't aware when scheduling it that the television version -- starring Sir John Gielgud and Dame Wendy Hiller -- would air on Maryland Public Television shortly before the start of the Olney run.But some of the best praise I can give Olney's "Best of Friends" and director John Going is that, despite its considerably longer length, the production holds up in comparison.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 28, 1995
David Henry Hwang's "M. Butterfly" is a remarkable play in at least three respects: The truth-is-stranger-than-fiction mystery that forms the core of the plot; the ability of an abhorrently chauvinistic and misguided protagonist to win the audience's understanding and possibly sympathy; and the way it interweaves the yin-and-yang themes of male vs. female, Occident vs. Orient and fantasy vs. reality.Two out of three of these are a clear miss in director Jim Petosa's production at Olney Theatre Center.
NEWS
By The Washington Post | May 16, 2011
Three people were killed early Sunday when the car in which they were riding crashed into a tree in Olney, according to Montgomery County Police. Passenger Spencer Datt, 18, of Derwood was pronounced dead at the scene. Two other passengers, Haeley N. McGuire, 18, and John Hoover, 20, both from Rockville, were pronounced dead at area hospitals. A fourth passenger and the driver of the Toyota Corolla, 20-year-old Kevin Coffay of Rockville, were treated at a local hospital for non-life-threatening injuries.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | February 11, 2011
Looking ahead to the 2011 season, ESPN's Buster Olney thinks your Baltimore Orioles are the most intriguing team in the AL East, which is significant considering the Red Sox overhaul, the Yankees' Cliff-Lee-less rotation and the changes in Tampa Bay. I linked up to this in my Friday Coffee Companion post , but let's discuss it a little here. "[The Orioles] haven’t made the playoffs in 13 years, but they’ve made some very strong additions to their lineup between Mark Reynolds and Vladimir Guerrero," Olney said in this video . It appears the additions of Reynolds, Guerrero, Derrek Lee and J.J. Hardy have someone all worked up because Olney mentioned an Orioles source who compared the Orioles lineup to the high-powered Yankees.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.