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NEWS
February 13, 2003
Ann Fox Olivier Reid, a former Harford County equestrienne, died of a heart attack Monday at her Bel Air home. She was 90. Born in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Stuart Olivier, who owned the old Baltimore News, a daily afternoon paper, from 1915 to 1917. Educated by tutors, she was raised on her family's Timonium estate, Five Farms, now the Baltimore Country Club, and at an apartment house her father built at Wyndhurst Avenue and North Charles Street in Baltimore. For many years, she trained thoroughbred horses at her Cubs Run Farm near Jarrettsville and rode with members of the Elkridge-Harford Hunt Club.
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FEATURES
By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,Los Angeles TImes | December 8, 2006
HOLLYWOOD-- --When Jack Black says he wants to tell you a sad story about his childhood, the natural reaction is to brace yourself for a grand, loopy lie that will leave your face hurting from laughter. But what if it's really true? Or does that really matter? Anyway, here he goes: "I went to a Renaissance fair when I was just a child. I remember there was a woman there dressed as a wench" -- right there he enunciates like a wrestling announcer channeling Olivier -- "and she's on top of a wooden platform.
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NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | February 8, 2006
The Cooking of Southwest France Recipes From France's Magnificent Rustic Cuisine Olivier Roellinger's Contemporary French Cuisine Fifty Recipes Inspired by the Sea With Anne Testut and Alain Willaume Flammarion / 2005 / $50 This is a book for the high-concept cook - especially one who doesn't mind paying nearly $1 a recipe (there are actually 53). Olivier Roellinger is a Brittany chef who really, really loves the sea. The ocean theme of his book extends to the recipe directions (cooking time is "cruising time"; equipment is "rigging," etc.)
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | February 8, 2006
The Cooking of Southwest France Recipes From France's Magnificent Rustic Cuisine Olivier Roellinger's Contemporary French Cuisine Fifty Recipes Inspired by the Sea With Anne Testut and Alain Willaume Flammarion / 2005 / $50 This is a book for the high-concept cook - especially one who doesn't mind paying nearly $1 a recipe (there are actually 53). Olivier Roellinger is a Brittany chef who really, really loves the sea. The ocean theme of his book extends to the recipe directions (cooking time is "cruising time"; equipment is "rigging," etc.)
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 19, 1994
Among the programs on TV tonight: ABC looking at infidelity, PBS looking at immortality, and CBS providing dramatic inanity.* "Touched by an Angel." (9-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Here's the inanity -- although this plot, in which Nia Peeples guest stars as a woman with a steamy past helped by Roma Downey's angel, contains hints of infidelity and immortality as well. CBS.* "The American Experience: Telegrams From the Dead." (9-10 p.m., WMPT, Channel 22 and Channel 67) -- THIS IS THE KING-STOP-WHY DID MY DAUGHTER MARRY THE KING OF POP-STOP-MAKE HER STOP-STOP . . . Actually, there are no bulletins from Elvis here -- just an interesting documentary about the "spiritualism craze" of the mid-19th century, one with which even Abraham Lincoln briefly flirted.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | October 22, 1990
On screen, she played "perhaps the greatest women's role ever" and earned two Academy Awards. Off screen, despite a real-life romance of legendary proportions, she struggled much of her life against the emotional illness of manic depression.She was Vivien Leigh, whose role as Scarlett O'Hara in "Gone With the Wind" is merely the most remembered of parts in 20 films and numerous stage plays. And her initially illicit love for and eventual marriage to Lawrence Olivier was romantic theater come to life.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | November 2, 1990
There is one major problem with the "Great Performances" staging of "Hamlet" at 9 tonight on MPT (Channels 22 and 67): Kevin Kline borrows too much from the 1948 film performance of Laurence Olivier.Who wouldn't, you say.Who wouldn't, indeed. But Olivier, great as he was, was never very good on television. His best work simply played too big for the smaller and more intimate television screen. He was too big in gesture, voice and presence.One of the ways Olivier so effectively communicated the anguish of the young prince, for example, was through speeches where his cadence would pick up speed and the voice would rise until it was up an octave or more and starting to crack into a kind of banshee wail.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 17, 1992
If anyone was ever richer than all his tribe, it was certainly Orson Welles: He was rich in talent and vision and energy. And like the Othello he played in one of his greatest movies, he was brought low by baser men who conspired against him, resentiIf anyone was ever richer than all his tribe, it was certainly Orson Welles: He was rich in talent and vision and energy. And like the Othello he played in one of his greatest movies, he was brought low by baser men who conspired against him, resenting his greatness; and at the same time, also like Othello, he had to share the responsibility for that destruction, so readily did he collaborate in it.Now, thanks to an inventive effort, "Othello" has been returned to us (it opens today at the Senator)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 17, 1992
If anyone was ever richer than all his tribe, it was certainly Orson Welles: he was rich in talent and vision and energy. And like the Othello he played in one of his greatest movies, he was brought low by baser men who conspired against him, resenting his greatness; and at the same time, also like Othello, he had to share the responsibility for that destruction, so readily did he collaborate in it.Now, thanks to an inventive effort, "Othello" has been...
FEATURES
By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,Los Angeles TImes | December 8, 2006
HOLLYWOOD-- --When Jack Black says he wants to tell you a sad story about his childhood, the natural reaction is to brace yourself for a grand, loopy lie that will leave your face hurting from laughter. But what if it's really true? Or does that really matter? Anyway, here he goes: "I went to a Renaissance fair when I was just a child. I remember there was a woman there dressed as a wench" -- right there he enunciates like a wrestling announcer channeling Olivier -- "and she's on top of a wooden platform.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 30, 2004
Some critics scoff at moviemakers who aim to be "timeless" and take refuge from contemporary chaos in fantasy and history. But writers and directors who train a piercing eye on the past often shed more light on today's news than filmmakers who tear their stories from the headlines. Take this scenario for a foreign misadventure movie: Once hailed for liberating an Islamic country from tyranny, a Western commander learns that a messianic extremist and his army have massacred thousands of troops and laid waste to native towns.
NEWS
February 13, 2003
Ann Fox Olivier Reid, a former Harford County equestrienne, died of a heart attack Monday at her Bel Air home. She was 90. Born in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Stuart Olivier, who owned the old Baltimore News, a daily afternoon paper, from 1915 to 1917. Educated by tutors, she was raised on her family's Timonium estate, Five Farms, now the Baltimore Country Club, and at an apartment house her father built at Wyndhurst Avenue and North Charles Street in Baltimore. For many years, she trained thoroughbred horses at her Cubs Run Farm near Jarrettsville and rode with members of the Elkridge-Harford Hunt Club.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 19, 1994
Among the programs on TV tonight: ABC looking at infidelity, PBS looking at immortality, and CBS providing dramatic inanity.* "Touched by an Angel." (9-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Here's the inanity -- although this plot, in which Nia Peeples guest stars as a woman with a steamy past helped by Roma Downey's angel, contains hints of infidelity and immortality as well. CBS.* "The American Experience: Telegrams From the Dead." (9-10 p.m., WMPT, Channel 22 and Channel 67) -- THIS IS THE KING-STOP-WHY DID MY DAUGHTER MARRY THE KING OF POP-STOP-MAKE HER STOP-STOP . . . Actually, there are no bulletins from Elvis here -- just an interesting documentary about the "spiritualism craze" of the mid-19th century, one with which even Abraham Lincoln briefly flirted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 7, 1993
If it weren't so good, it would be glib fun to dismiss "Olivier Olivier" as a fractured fairy tale for recondite adult tastes; it's about a little boy on his way to grandmother's house with a food basket who is set upon by a wolf.Yet that symbolic overlay is never intrusive or self-conscious; it's part of the quiet, clammy art of the film which advances through horror one intimate detail after another. Directed by the legendary Agnieszka Holland ("Europa, Europa"), the film is an existential thriller as chilly and dislocating as anything by Chabrol or Sluizer or Hitchcock, other masters of the art."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 17, 1992
If anyone was ever richer than all his tribe, it was certainly Orson Welles: He was rich in talent and vision and energy. And like the Othello he played in one of his greatest movies, he was brought low by baser men who conspired against him, resentiIf anyone was ever richer than all his tribe, it was certainly Orson Welles: He was rich in talent and vision and energy. And like the Othello he played in one of his greatest movies, he was brought low by baser men who conspired against him, resenting his greatness; and at the same time, also like Othello, he had to share the responsibility for that destruction, so readily did he collaborate in it.Now, thanks to an inventive effort, "Othello" has been returned to us (it opens today at the Senator)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 17, 1992
If anyone was ever richer than all his tribe, it was certainly Orson Welles: he was rich in talent and vision and energy. And like the Othello he played in one of his greatest movies, he was brought low by baser men who conspired against him, resenting his greatness; and at the same time, also like Othello, he had to share the responsibility for that destruction, so readily did he collaborate in it.Now, thanks to an inventive effort, "Othello" has been...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 7, 1993
If it weren't so good, it would be glib fun to dismiss "Olivier Olivier" as a fractured fairy tale for recondite adult tastes; it's about a little boy on his way to grandmother's house with a food basket who is set upon by a wolf.Yet that symbolic overlay is never intrusive or self-conscious; it's part of the quiet, clammy art of the film which advances through horror one intimate detail after another. Directed by the legendary Agnieszka Holland ("Europa, Europa"), the film is an existential thriller as chilly and dislocating as anything by Chabrol or Sluizer or Hitchcock, other masters of the art."
NEWS
By Carrie Rickey and Carrie Rickey,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 22, 1992
LAURENCE OLIVIER:A BIOGRAPHY.Donald Spoto.HarperCollins.460 pages. $23.Not to put too fine a point on it, biographer Donald Spoto -- who has given us scrupulously researched chronicles of director Alfred Hitchcock and playwright Tennessee Williams -- is the Kitty Kelley of scholars.Like his earlier books, Mr. Spoto's latest, "Laurence Olivier: A Biography," marinates dry facts in juicy gossip. Admittedly, it's a crude way to give savor to the former and meat to the latter, but who can resist his dish that Lord Olivier, the much-married king of Shakespearean tragedians, enjoyed a secret 10-year homosexual romp with American clown prince Danny Kaye?
NEWS
By Carrie Rickey and Carrie Rickey,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 22, 1992
LAURENCE OLIVIER:A BIOGRAPHY.Donald Spoto.HarperCollins.460 pages. $23.Not to put too fine a point on it, biographer Donald Spoto -- who has given us scrupulously researched chronicles of director Alfred Hitchcock and playwright Tennessee Williams -- is the Kitty Kelley of scholars.Like his earlier books, Mr. Spoto's latest, "Laurence Olivier: A Biography," marinates dry facts in juicy gossip. Admittedly, it's a crude way to give savor to the former and meat to the latter, but who can resist his dish that Lord Olivier, the much-married king of Shakespearean tragedians, enjoyed a secret 10-year homosexual romp with American clown prince Danny Kaye?
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 13, 1991
It has been remarked that each age invents its own Shakespeare, which is certainly true, or at least true enough. But if it follows necessarily that each age invents its own Hamlet, then brother, are we in trouble.Compare Laurence Olivier's 1948 version of the Shakespearian tragedy with the Mel Gibson/Franco Zeffirelli model opening here Friday and you get a chilling sense of what that means. It's not that Gibson is ungifted, or that he brings to his interpretation -- the word is used loosely -- a particular sense of stupidity.
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