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Oliver Twist

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By Evan Siple | October 9, 2012
Salt is a solid destination for new American cuisine in the heart of Upper Fells Point, boasting a clean, stylish interior awaiting your dinner or happy hour needs with bright solid color motifs and independent art on virtually every wall. Whether you're there for some lavish entrees like foie gras stuffed grilled quail or something simple like their coveted duck fat fries, chances are fairly high there's a cocktail to match. Bartender Harry Philavanh, an Eastern Shore native, explained that, "The list is seasonally rotating, we like to change it up to reflect the changes in the menu every few months.
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NEWS
December 31, 2012
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar - another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: SOBRIQUET Adam started us in the naming business, according to Genesis, and human beings have been keen to name objects, animals, other human beings, concepts, and themselves ever since. Many of us have, in addition to our formal birth names, one or more casual names, or nicknames.
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NEWS
By Dawn Fallik and Dawn Fallik,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 4, 1998
Two standout performances bring out the best in Toby's Dinner Theatre's latest production of "Oliver!," a show that's sure to have audiences asking, along with the title character, for "some more."Musicals are Toby's forte, and "Oliver!" is presented in top form, with a strong ensemble, good set and overall smooth production.Audiences who haven't seen this musical for a while will have forgotten just how many good songs there are in the 1963 Tony award winner. From "Consider Yourself," to "Reviewing the Situation," Toby's cast does not disappoint in presenting the old favorites in a familiar story.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | October 9, 2012
Salt is a solid destination for new American cuisine in the heart of Upper Fells Point, boasting a clean, stylish interior awaiting your dinner or happy hour needs with bright solid color motifs and independent art on virtually every wall. Whether you're there for some lavish entrees like foie gras stuffed grilled quail or something simple like their coveted duck fat fries, chances are fairly high there's a cocktail to match. Bartender Harry Philavanh, an Eastern Shore native, explained that, "The list is seasonally rotating, we like to change it up to reflect the changes in the menu every few months.
NEWS
By George Neff Lucas | April 4, 1994
They never quite made up and kissedBut he hoped for at least an assist;Instead, eye for eye,Ronnie gave Semper FiThe dickens -- an Oliver twist.For the worse, politics takes a turn --Worse worse would be hard to discern;Can New Yorkers *The public parts ofA gubernatorial Stern?
FEATURES
September 23, 2005
NOSFERATU -- F.W. Murnau's masterpiece of silent-film horror, 1922's Nosferatu, A Symphony of Horror, with Max Schreck as the vampire against which all future bloodsuckers would be measured (and most would come up short), will be shown Thursday at the Senator Theatre, 5904 York Road, in a screening sponsored by the Senator and the Creative Alliance. A live score will be performed by Devil Music Ensemble, a Boston rock band. Showtime is 8 p.m., and tickets are $10. Information: 410-435-8338.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | April 17, 1991
MENTION THE name of David Lean, and the word that comes immediately to mind is epic. Lean, British-born film director who died yesterday at the age of 83, was responsible for films like ''Bridge on the River Kwai'' (1957), ''Lawrence of Arabia'' (1962), ''Dr. HD (1965), ''Ryan's Daughter'' (1970) and, most recently, ''Passage to India'' (1984).His movies won 28 Academy Awards, including two for Best Director for "Lawrence" and "Kwai." ''Lawrence" won seven.Lean began his career doing smaller films.
NEWS
December 31, 2012
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar - another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: SOBRIQUET Adam started us in the naming business, according to Genesis, and human beings have been keen to name objects, animals, other human beings, concepts, and themselves ever since. Many of us have, in addition to our formal birth names, one or more casual names, or nicknames.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | November 15, 1997
Hot on the heels of its triumph with "Cinderella," "The Wonderful World of Disney" takes on "Oliver Twist" (7 p.m.-9 p.m. tomorrow, WMAR, Channel 2) with much of the same exuberance, magic and charm.Just as Whitney Houston did in "Cinderella," Richard Dreyfuss both stars and serves as an executive producer in this production. His performance as Fagin is a magic act in that he manages to make this ancient tutor to a band of child pickpockets in Dickens' London both menacing and likable in a flim-flam-man kind of way.Almost as impressive are the performances of Elijah Wood as the Artful Dodger and Alex Trench as Oliver.
FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 24, 1997
LONDON -- It's not every University of Maryland English professor who finds his work ridiculed on the front page of a British newspaper. But then, few have ever courted controversy like William A. Cohen, whose book outlines a sexual reading of works by Charles Dickens.Cohen's "Sex Scandal: The Private Parts of Victorian Fiction," was panned by the Observer recently in an article headlined "Coded erotica of 'filthy' Dickens."The article claimed "The lunatics have taken over the asylum" of American academia, and went on to quote Dickens scholar John Sutherland of London University, who exclaimed: "Any ordinary Dickens fan reading Cohen will think he's a Martian."
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2012
Compass Rose Studio Theater will complete a successful inaugural season this spring, capped by Lionel Bart's classic musical "Oliver. " Based on Dickens' novel "Oliver Twist," the story of an impoverished orphan sold to an undertaker before escaping to join a gang of pickpockets, Bart's musical adaptation premiered in London in 1960. It ran for a record-setting 12 years and created several beloved standards including "Consider Yourself," "Where is Love?" and "As Long as He Needs Me. " Bart strips down Dickens' tale to essentials in his musical, which is appropriately shrunk further by Compass Rose director Lucinda Merry-Browne to fit her intimate theater space.
FEATURES
October 7, 2005
Can Jodie Foster's airplane thriller Flightplan stay atop the box office? Or will Wallace & Gromit or Cameron Diaz's In Her Shoes bring it back to Earth? The top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters last Friday through Sunday, with distributor, gross, number of theaters, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, compiled by Exhibitor Relations Co. Inc. are: Rk (lw)Title (Studio)......Weekend....No.of....Per....Gross ................................
NEWS
September 29, 2005
NATIONAL Embattled DeLay steps aside Tom DeLay, the Texas Republican whose bare-knuckled style propelled him to the top echelons of the House and drew allegations of ethical lapses, was forced to step aside as majority leader yesterday, after a Texas grand jury indicted him for conspiracy to break campaign finance laws. PG 1A Bush nearing choice for court President Bush is close to naming a successor to Justice Sandra Day O'Connor and could announce his choice this week, Republicans close to the White House said yesterday.
FEATURES
September 23, 2005
NOSFERATU -- F.W. Murnau's masterpiece of silent-film horror, 1922's Nosferatu, A Symphony of Horror, with Max Schreck as the vampire against which all future bloodsuckers would be measured (and most would come up short), will be shown Thursday at the Senator Theatre, 5904 York Road, in a screening sponsored by the Senator and the Creative Alliance. A live score will be performed by Devil Music Ensemble, a Boston rock band. Showtime is 8 p.m., and tickets are $10. Information: 410-435-8338.
NEWS
April 27, 2005
THE NATION'S passenger rail system shouldn't be treated like Oliver Twist - starved, orphaned and generally tormented. But Amtrak is, if you'll pardon the expression, getting the Dickens beaten out of it again under the guise of reform. The Bush administration has zeroed out Amtrak's budget to send a "wake-up call" to Capitol Hill. States would be expected to foot a significant share of the corporation's losses and, ultimately, privatize most of Amtrak's services. It's an ill-conceived plan.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 26, 2004
Consider "Consider Yourself." In Oliver!, it's the number in which young Oliver Twist makes the acquaintance of the Artful Dodger and, in the process, gets his first glimpse of London street life. And, in the touring version of Oliver! at the Lyric Opera House, what a splendid glimpse it is! Under the direction of Graham Gill, with choreography by Matthew Bourne, this street scene is played out on two levels. With various London buildings gliding by in the background, the scene features merchants, washerwomen and even a couple of mimes.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Sun | July 27, 1994
What with a cast numbering more than 70, the Cockpit in Court production of "Oliver!" puts seemingly every urchin in Essex on stage at Essex Community College.As an ambitious mounting of the Lionel Bart musical based on Charles Dickens' novel "Oliver Twist," this production doesn't stint when it comes to suggesting the crowded slums inhabited by Oliver and his fellow orphans. If anything, the stage is so packed with grimy-faced, Cockney dialect-spewing kids that the theater really should rename itself Cockney in Court for the duration of the run.Enjoyable as this production is -- and not just to the multitude of parents and siblings in the audience -- it still needs, to borrow the title of one song, a bit more "Omm-pah-pah."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 26, 2004
Consider "Consider Yourself." In Oliver!, it's the number in which young Oliver Twist makes the acquaintance of the Artful Dodger and, in the process, gets his first glimpse of London street life. And, in the touring version of Oliver! at the Lyric Opera House, what a splendid glimpse it is! Under the direction of Graham Gill, with choreography by Matthew Bourne, this street scene is played out on two levels. With various London buildings gliding by in the background, the scene features merchants, washerwomen and even a couple of mimes.
NEWS
By Dawn Fallik and Dawn Fallik,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 4, 1998
Two standout performances bring out the best in Toby's Dinner Theatre's latest production of "Oliver!," a show that's sure to have audiences asking, along with the title character, for "some more."Musicals are Toby's forte, and "Oliver!" is presented in top form, with a strong ensemble, good set and overall smooth production.Audiences who haven't seen this musical for a while will have forgotten just how many good songs there are in the 1963 Tony award winner. From "Consider Yourself," to "Reviewing the Situation," Toby's cast does not disappoint in presenting the old favorites in a familiar story.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | November 15, 1997
Hot on the heels of its triumph with "Cinderella," "The Wonderful World of Disney" takes on "Oliver Twist" (7 p.m.-9 p.m. tomorrow, WMAR, Channel 2) with much of the same exuberance, magic and charm.Just as Whitney Houston did in "Cinderella," Richard Dreyfuss both stars and serves as an executive producer in this production. His performance as Fagin is a magic act in that he manages to make this ancient tutor to a band of child pickpockets in Dickens' London both menacing and likable in a flim-flam-man kind of way.Almost as impressive are the performances of Elijah Wood as the Artful Dodger and Alex Trench as Oliver.
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