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Oliver S Twist

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NEWS
May 28, 1995
Maryland's horse industry got an encouraging boost when Oliver's Twist, owned, bred and trained in Harford County, finished second in this month's Preakness. It was the best showing by a Maryland horse in Maryland's premier race since 1983, when Deputed Testamony won the Pimlico classic. Bill Boniface Jr. of Darlington's Bonita Farm was the trainer of both horses.Oliver's Twist, owned by Charles Oliver, an Aberdeen insurance broker and part-time airplane pilot, was bought for $6,000 from Mr. Boniface on a lark.
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SPORTS
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | May 15, 1999
BREAKERName: Marshall W. SilvermanMaryland Ties to Preakness: Spartan Cat (6th, 1998).Role: To untested yearlings, Marshall Silverman is Mr. Manners. He has broken thousands of spirited young thoroughbreds, teaching them to accept a rider, to behave. "Never had a horse I couldn't break," says Silverman, of New Freedom, Pa. "The trick is to move at the animal's pace. You don't want to jerk all of the heart out of them." Spartan Cat was relatively easy to break, he says, "considering his ornery temperament.
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SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | September 17, 1995
Whatever happened to Oliver's Twist?The local 3-year-old who nearly stole this year's Preakness might resurface in the Maryland Million Classic.But it's no sure thing.Trainer Billy Boniface had hoped to start the colt in the Pennsylvania Derby on Labor Day after the horse spent most of the summer recuperating from a disastrous race in the June 17 Ohio Derby. "Oliver" was nearly eased in that race and it's still undetermined what caused the poor performance.Now a bruised foot has impeded the horse's latest comeback attempt, although Boniface said the son of Horatius is in training "and I'm doing everything I can to get him to the Million, since it doesn't look like it's going to be that tough a race."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 29, 1997
Oliver's Twist, who nearly claimed a Preakness trophy for Maryland in 1995, has been retired and transported to Florida for his breeding career.Bonita Farm, the Boniface-family operation in Harford County, sold the 5-year-old horse to Red Oak Farm in Ocala. The sale is contingent upon a semen analysis for Oliver's Twist.After a career marked by injury and illness, Oliver's Twist's final setback was a chip in his right front ankle."I thought he'd given me all he could give me," said Bill Boniface, his trainer.
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | May 21, 1995
The weather cleared in plenty of time for the party. The one that draws tens of thousands to the infield at Pimlico Race Course. The one that brings trainer D. Wayne Lukas and jockey (( Pat Day to town each year for their seemingly annual Preakness victory. The one that makes Baltimore the center of the racing universe for one Saturday every May.Pimlico officials sweated out three days of rain, but conditions were beautiful when favorite Timber Country came down the stretch for the victory that everyone thought he would get two weeks ago at the Kentucky Derby.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | June 17, 1995
Preakness runner-up Oliver's Twist got a break yesterday when Da Hoss, the highly regarded second choice in today's $300,000 Ohio Derby in Cleveland, was scratched.Michael Dickinson, who trains the Jersey Derby winner at the Fair Hill Training Center in Cecil County, said some mucus showed up after Da Hoss worked three-eighths of a mile at Fair Hill yesterday."He's not sick. He has no fever," said Dickinson, who decided after the workout to withdraw the Gone West gelding. "But when mucus shows up, he's not likely to run well."
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | March 11, 1995
Two Maryland-bred champions -- Triple Crown-age Oliver's Twist and the state's 1994 Horse of the Year Concern -- face major tests this weekend at southern racetracks.Today at Gulfstream Park in Hallandale, Fla., Oliver's Twist gets another chance to prove he belongs in the sport's top echelon of 3-year-olds.At 15-1 odds in the morning line, the colt, who was voted 1994 state-bred juvenile colt champion and is owned by Aberdeen insurance broker Charles Oliver, is the second-longest shot in the 10-horse field set for the $500,000 Florida Derby.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1995
The weather was dreadful: Pouring rain. Thunder and lightning. It was an understatement to say the track was sloppy.But assistant trainer Kevin Boniface wouldn't use the elements as an alibi yesterday when he assessed Oliver's Twist's third-place performance in the Maryland Million Classic two weeks ago."Everybody had to run over that track," said Boniface. "Sometimes, it's a little bit of an advantage for horses who have been over it 60 times rather than 15, but basically I think he just came up a little bit short."
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Sun Staff Writer | June 10, 1995
Three weeks after nearly winning the Preakness, Oliver's zTC Twist is working diligently toward his next start, in the $300,000 Ohio Derby."He came out of the Preakness super and worked a mile a couple days ago," said trainer Bill Boniface. "He'll have one more work before he leaves Friday morning by chartered jet."Boniface said he has no second thoughts about Oliver's Twist skipping the Belmont in favor of next Saturday's 1 1/8 -mile test at Thistledown."I don't think the distance [1 1/2 miles]
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Sun Staff Writer | April 1, 1995
Maryland-based Oliver's Twist was shipped to Gulfstream Park this winter to face the best of the nation's 3-year-old crop. It was a proving ground that might have carried him into the Kentucky Derby.But after three defeats, a possible Run for the Roses has been scrapped in favor of a quest for the black-eyed Susans."He might be a notch below the best, but we had to find out some time," trainer Billy Boniface said. "It seemed like a good plan and we had hopes, but they didn't work out."Boniface said instead of the Derby, Oliver's Twist is being pointed toward the Preakness on May 20, with the Grade III Federico Tesio Stakes at Pimlico serving as the final prep race.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1996
You had 4-year-old Oliver's Twist, trained by J. William "Bill" Boniface, who has trained a Preakness Stakes winner. You had 5-year-old Brilliant Patriot, trained by Robert Barbara, who trains in New York alongside the McGaugheys and Motts.And then you had the 9-year-old Frugal Doc, trained by D. Scott Posey, who couldn't find an owner who'd let him train a horse 10 years ago because his hair was too long -- even longer than today.So who won the $200,000 Maryland Million Classic, the highlight of yesterday's Maryland Million Day at Laurel Park?
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1996
J. William "Bill" Boniface, whose horses won one Preakness Stakes and nearly won another, says his Oliver's Twist is primed for tomorrow's $200,000 Maryland Million Classic.Bobby Barbara, a New York trainer whose Brilliant Patriot is Boniface's main threat, says no problem. Brilliant Patriot has beaten Oliver's Twist twice, and Barbara expects him to do it again.The two last met Sept. 20 in a $30,000 allowance race at Pimlico Race Course. Oliver's Twist followed Brilliant Patriot around the track.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1996
Horses from Canada, California, New York and Florida are returning to the state where they were conceived for Saturday's 11th running of the Maryland Million at Laurel Park.A total of 122 horses sired by Maryland stallions -- most of whom remained in their home state for their racing careers -- are entered in the Maryland Million's 11 races. Purses for the races -- one steeplechase, two others on turf, eight on dirt -- total $1 million.The richest purse is reserved for the $200,000 Maryland Million Classic, which features the ongoing showdown between the defending champion, Brilliant Patriot, and last year's Preakness Stakes runner-up, Oliver's Twist.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1995
Oliver's Twist was dull, so Mighty Magee stole the show and the race.Left alone up front to set slow fractions, Mighty Magee had plenty left through the lane yesterday and won the $75,000 Annapolis Stakes at Laurel Park.The 3-year-old son of Cormorant held off the late charge of Algar, prevailing by 1 1/4 lengths over the 1 1/8 -mile route.It was a reprieve of sorts for Mighty Magee, who almost went on the market after taking the Sir Barton Stakes and Broad Brush Stakes at Pimlico."The owners [Allan Spath and partners]
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1995
The sun came out midway through the card and dried out the track, changing the surface rating from muddy to fast.Oliver's Twist had command for more than a mile, running easily on the lead with a leisurely pace.But the Preakness runner-up couldn't fight off the late charge of My Manuscript, who overtook him in the final 16th of a mile to win the $100,000 Governor's Cup by 3 1/4 lengths at Laurel Park yesterday.There were no excuses for Oliver's Twist, the 1-2 favorite who was making his third start after being eased in the Ohio Derby on June 17."
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1995
The weather was dreadful: Pouring rain. Thunder and lightning. It was an understatement to say the track was sloppy.But assistant trainer Kevin Boniface wouldn't use the elements as an alibi yesterday when he assessed Oliver's Twist's third-place performance in the Maryland Million Classic two weeks ago."Everybody had to run over that track," said Boniface. "Sometimes, it's a little bit of an advantage for horses who have been over it 60 times rather than 15, but basically I think he just came up a little bit short."
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | April 26, 1995
Trainer Billy Boniface yesterday ruled out any possibility of running Oliver's Twist, winner of the Federico Tesio Stakes, in the Kentucky Derby next week.But he is aiming the horse for the Preakness on May 20.The Derby was eliminated, Boniface said, because "of the track [at Churchill Downs]. There's not enough time to ship there and acclimate him to the surface."Oliver's Twist is one of about five 3-year-olds who are skipping the Derby, but could be Preakness-bound. Others include the Nick Zito-trained pair of Star Standard and Mr. Greeley; Mystery Storm, second choice in Saturday's Arkansas Derby, who finished fifth; and Houston Sunrise, winner of the San Pedro Stakes at Santa Anita Park on April 12.Each of Zito's colts has won a stakes at the current Keeneland, Ky., race meet.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1996
Horses from Canada, California, New York and Florida are returning to the state where they were conceived for Saturday's 11th running of the Maryland Million at Laurel Park.A total of 122 horses sired by Maryland stallions -- most of whom remained in their home state for their racing careers -- are entered in the Maryland Million's 11 races. Purses for the races -- one steeplechase, two others on turf, eight on dirt -- total $1 million.The richest purse is reserved for the $200,000 Maryland Million Classic, which features the ongoing showdown between the defending champion, Brilliant Patriot, and last year's Preakness Stakes runner-up, Oliver's Twist.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1995
Vinnie Blengs, the trainer who had waited until the Maryland Million's 10th anniversary to run his first horses in it, shook his head as he saddled Brilliant Patriot for the $200,000 Classic."
SPORTS
By ROSS PEDDICORD and ROSS PEDDICORD,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1995
It might have been a perfect match.Corey Nakatani, the Southern California jockey who is second only to Jerry Bailey in the national rider standings, and Oliver's Twist in the Maryland Million Classic.But it wasn't meant to be.Each will get top billing today among the human and equine athletes competing on the 11-race Million card. But they won't be together."Nakatani called and wanted to ride 'Oliver,' " said Billy Boniface, trainer of the 3-year-old colt who grabbed the attention of Maryland's horse community last spring when he came oh-so-close to winning the Preakness.
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