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Oliver Goldsmith

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By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1997
C. Oliver Goldsmith, an attorney who bred and raised thoroughbred racehorses for more than three decades at his Longwood Farm in Howard County, died Monday of pneumonia at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 69.Mr. Goldsmith enjoyed fox hunting and was former master of the Howard County Hounds. He was also vice president of the Maryland Horse Breeders Association."He was just an all-around horseman," said Tim Capps, executive vice president of the association. "He loved horses. He was an old-fashioned horseman who liked all aspects of their beauty and athleticism.
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SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2001
Turn Capp, one of Maryland's beloved old mares, died yesterday at Spring Meadow Farm in Glenwood in Howard County. She was 29. Boasting an incredible record of 14 winners from 18 foals, Turn Capp was Maryland's 1996 broodmare of the year. She produced the stakes winners Say Capp, Capp It Off and Capp The Power. She was the granddam of Miss Slewpy and the great-granddam of Smoke Glacken and Disco Rico. One of the last public acts of her owner, C. Oliver Goldsmith, weakened from cancer, was accepting Turn Capp's prestigious award at the Maryland Horse Breeders Association awards dinner in April 1997.
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SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | July 27, 1997
The pastures are quiet, his mansion still. C. Oliver Goldsmith, who roared through life, is gone. And nearly all his horses, who raced and bred with their owner's gusto, are going.One of Maryland's most prominent horse owners and breeders, and also one of its foremost characters, Goldsmith died in May at age 69. But before he succumbed to a malignant brain tumor, his Turn Capp, one of the most amazing broodmares anywhere, gave birth to a filly.For the 25-year-old mare, this was her 18th foal -- although not a record, an achievement rarely matched.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 8, 2000
Center Stage celebrates its 25th year on Calvert Street with Oliver Goldsmith's "She Stoops to Conquer," which opens the season Tuesday. First produced by Center Stage in 1976, the 18th-century comedy follows the amorous adventures of a well-bred young lady named Kate Hardcastle and her beloved, Charles Marlow, who is only at ease among lower-class wenches. The production is staged by artistic director Irene Lewis and stars Carrie Preston and Reese Madigan. Roland Bull repeats his 1976 role as Charles' father.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 8, 2000
Center Stage celebrates its 25th year on Calvert Street with Oliver Goldsmith's "She Stoops to Conquer," which opens the season Tuesday. First produced by Center Stage in 1976, the 18th-century comedy follows the amorous adventures of a well-bred young lady named Kate Hardcastle and her beloved, Charles Marlow, who is only at ease among lower-class wenches. The production is staged by artistic director Irene Lewis and stars Carrie Preston and Reese Madigan. Roland Bull repeats his 1976 role as Charles' father.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2001
Turn Capp, one of Maryland's beloved old mares, died yesterday at Spring Meadow Farm in Glenwood in Howard County. She was 29. Boasting an incredible record of 14 winners from 18 foals, Turn Capp was Maryland's 1996 broodmare of the year. She produced the stakes winners Say Capp, Capp It Off and Capp The Power. She was the granddam of Miss Slewpy and the great-granddam of Smoke Glacken and Disco Rico. One of the last public acts of her owner, C. Oliver Goldsmith, weakened from cancer, was accepting Turn Capp's prestigious award at the Maryland Horse Breeders Association awards dinner in April 1997.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1998
After months of trying to preserve Longwood Farm for another generation of Goldsmiths, Robert Goldsmith has decided not to buy the Howard County estate of his father, C. Oliver Goldsmith, who died last spring.Robert Goldsmith, 30, a veterinarian, has retained some of his father's horses for himself and family members. But he said last week that he could not afford to buy the 100-acre Longwood Farm, his father's beloved horse farm -- and site of Oliver Goldsmith's famous parties."I tried to make the numbers work, but I just couldn't do it," Robert said.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | January 29, 1995
Rick Wilson, who occasionally shifts his tack around between New Jersey, Florida and the local tracks, is spending the winter at Laurel Park, riding the fastest 3-year-olds in Maryland.Wilson has averaged winning a stakes a week during the past month with a pair of speedy youngsters -- Onto Luck in the 3-year-old male division and White Cliffs, fastest of the local 3-year-old fillies.A potential spoiler from New England, the filly Shananie's Presence, shipped in from Suffolk Downs yesterday and tried to out-run White Cliffs in the $53,450 Marshua Stakes.
SPORTS
By ROSS PEDDICORD and ROSS PEDDICORD,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1995
It might not be a rivalry to equal the one between Triple Crown trainers D. Wayne Lukas and Nick Zito.But Billy Boniface and King Leatherbury have their own sparring match going on in the 10th Maryland Million."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 23, 2000
From Nazi trials to swing dancing, from Thornton Wilder to August Wilson, Center Stage's 2000-2001 season will offer a broad mix of subject matter, periods and styles. The most ambitious offering will be Peter Weiss' "The Investigation," based on the actual testimony of Nazi guards, doctors and officials who were brought to trial by Auschwitz survivors in 1964. The production is supported by a $55,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. "I built the season around it," artistic director Irene Lewis said of "The Investigation," which she has been interested in directing for several years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 23, 2000
From Nazi trials to swing dancing, from Thornton Wilder to August Wilson, Center Stage's 2000-2001 season will offer a broad mix of subject matter, periods and styles. The most ambitious offering will be Peter Weiss' "The Investigation," based on the actual testimony of Nazi guards, doctors and officials who were brought to trial by Auschwitz survivors in 1964. The production is supported by a $55,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. "I built the season around it," artistic director Irene Lewis said of "The Investigation," which she has been interested in directing for several years.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1998
After months of trying to preserve Longwood Farm for another generation of Goldsmiths, Robert Goldsmith has decided not to buy the Howard County estate of his father, C. Oliver Goldsmith, who died last spring.Robert Goldsmith, 30, a veterinarian, has retained some of his father's horses for himself and family members. But he said last week that he could not afford to buy the 100-acre Longwood Farm, his father's beloved horse farm -- and site of Oliver Goldsmith's famous parties."I tried to make the numbers work, but I just couldn't do it," Robert said.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | July 27, 1997
The pastures are quiet, his mansion still. C. Oliver Goldsmith, who roared through life, is gone. And nearly all his horses, who raced and bred with their owner's gusto, are going.One of Maryland's most prominent horse owners and breeders, and also one of its foremost characters, Goldsmith died in May at age 69. But before he succumbed to a malignant brain tumor, his Turn Capp, one of the most amazing broodmares anywhere, gave birth to a filly.For the 25-year-old mare, this was her 18th foal -- although not a record, an achievement rarely matched.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1997
C. Oliver Goldsmith, an attorney who bred and raised thoroughbred racehorses for more than three decades at his Longwood Farm in Howard County, died Monday of pneumonia at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 69.Mr. Goldsmith enjoyed fox hunting and was former master of the Howard County Hounds. He was also vice president of the Maryland Horse Breeders Association."He was just an all-around horseman," said Tim Capps, executive vice president of the association. "He loved horses. He was an old-fashioned horseman who liked all aspects of their beauty and athleticism.
SPORTS
By ROSS PEDDICORD and ROSS PEDDICORD,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1995
It might not be a rivalry to equal the one between Triple Crown trainers D. Wayne Lukas and Nick Zito.But Billy Boniface and King Leatherbury have their own sparring match going on in the 10th Maryland Million."
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | January 29, 1995
Rick Wilson, who occasionally shifts his tack around between New Jersey, Florida and the local tracks, is spending the winter at Laurel Park, riding the fastest 3-year-olds in Maryland.Wilson has averaged winning a stakes a week during the past month with a pair of speedy youngsters -- Onto Luck in the 3-year-old male division and White Cliffs, fastest of the local 3-year-old fillies.A potential spoiler from New England, the filly Shananie's Presence, shipped in from Suffolk Downs yesterday and tried to out-run White Cliffs in the $53,450 Marshua Stakes.
SPORTS
By Special to The Sun | May 20, 1991
Capp the Power sprinted to the lead at the start and led thereafter for a 3 1/4 -length victory in the 16th running of the $100,000 Geisha Handicap at Pimlico yesterday.Capp the Power completed 1 1/16 miles in 1 minute, 45 3/5 seconds with jockey Michael Luzzi, whose 52nd win at Pimlico this spring gave him one more win than runner-up Edgar Prado.McKilts finished second by two lengths over Miss Protege, as Valay Maid, the even money favorite in the field of seven Maryland-bred fillies and mares, finished sixth.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1997
Two popular Maryland-breds scored dramatic victories yesterday in a pair of $75,000 stakes races at Laurel Park.C. Oliver Goldsmith's Miss Slewpy won the Maryland Racing Writers' Handicap after shaking off a determined early challenge by Mesabi Maiden, and Mary's Buckaroo won the Native Dancer Handicap after driving past front-runners Western Echo and Richie The Coach. Both races were 1 1/8 miles.Before nearly 6,000 fans in person and 5,000 more at the state's off-track betting sites, the odds-on Miss Slewpy prevailed for the fourth time in her past six races.
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