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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | January 25, 1995
Consumers discouraged by a barrage of news reports that make it seem almost every food they love is bad for them -- milk, coffee, eggs, butter, burritos, and kung pao chicken, just to name a few on recent hit lists -- can rejoice in a bit of good news.Olive oil is good for you. It's especially good for women, a new report says, because "alone among fat types," olive oil appears to reduce the risk of getting breast cancer. The assessment is based on a study of women in Greece, where olive oil is widely used in cooking.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | January 20, 2014
With more freezing weather on the way, I offer an 18-step plan for staying warm and sufficiently fed, making optimum use of the stove for heating and for creating enough meals for the remainder of the week. This is what humans have desired since the Middle Paleolithic period: fire, warmth, cooked proteins and vegetables, resulting in comfort food and comfortable domicile. It's all in my plan. Not only will several hours of early-morning cooking compensate for the inadequacies of your home-heating system; you'll get a good workout, an exercise in multitasking and a warm glow all over For this, you need to have: a whole chicken, a pound of Italian sausage, potatoes, yellow onions, flour, vegetable oil, olive oil, yeast, celery, two large cans of tomato sauce, a dozen eggs, butter, milk, garlic, rice, penne pasta, carrots and the basic seasonings that can be found in most kitchens.
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NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | May 30, 1999
The first pickings of the season are a spring tonic for vegetable lovers. What better way to make the most of their freshness than by serving them as a separate course? Dipped or cooked in olive oil, young vegetables are a favorite form of antipasto. Italy's Piedmont region is the home of bagna cauda (hot bath), a warm, pungent dip for raw vegetables or bread. A zesty antipasto or side dish for grilled fish or chicken is new potatoes and onions in an olive-oil marinade. Bagna Cauda Makes about 1/2 cup 1/2 cup virgin or pure olive oil 1 tablespoon butter 1/2 tablespoon minced garlic 2 ounces anchovy fillets, mashed salt and freshly ground pepper In small skillet over moderate heat, heat oil and butter until bubbly.
NEWS
January 9, 2014
In response to Bubbe's blintzes ("Remaking Bubbe's blintzes with a healthier profile," Jan. 8), I must question how that treasured blintz could succumb to olive oil, cashews and, perish the thought, tofu. Those of us who eat this noble delicacy full of eggs, cheese and the warmth of a loving cook could never allow our blintz to be debased into this 21st century healthy alternative. Sometimes, we just have to take a stand in defense of our palates. Dovey Kahn, Pikesville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2012
It's been years since Maggie Lebherz lived in sunny Spain as a college exchange student. Yet just one taste of fresh olive oil takes her back in spirit. "In 2007, I lived with a family in Salamanca, and my host mother cooked everything in olive oil, in a big cast-iron skillet," recalls Lebherz. "She rarely changed the oil, and it became spiced. Whether she was frying potatoes in olive oil or making paella, every meal was so delicious. " After Lebherz returned to the States and graduated from college, her cravings for the quality olive oil she'd enjoyed abroad turned her into an entrepreneur.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2012
Baltimore-based Pompeian Inc. has become the first olive oil maker to have the quality of its products backed by the United States Department of Agriculture, the company announced. The manufacturer has obtained approval for its extra virgin and extra virgin organic olive oils through the USDA's Quality Monitoring Program, which tests products to verify purity and quality. To enter the USDA program, Pompeian agreed to unannounced visits and testing of product samples. The product verification will allow the privately owned company to start placing a USDA logo on its products this month and will give consumers additional assurances, said David Bensadoun, chief executive officer of Pompeian.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | August 27, 2008
A person who broke into an East Baltimore company and opened a valve to a tanker holding nearly 6,000 gallons of olive oil caused a spill that marred the harbor's waters and could take days to clean, authorities said yesterday. Baltimore police and state environmental officials believe someone broke into Pompeian Olive Oil Co. in the 4200 block of Pulaski Highway and opened the valve. It's unclear what the intruder's motives were, authorities said. The extra-virgin oil ran from the plastic-lined steel container into a storm drain, flowing for two miles into the harbor near Boston Avenue and Linwood streets in Canton.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1996
A prominent Baltimore-based advertising firm has won a $2.5 million- to $3 million-a-year contract from the Greek government and its olive oil industry to promote olive oil in the United States and Canada.Trahan, Burden & Charles, which until recently marketed the Spanish Pompeian olive oil, was selected by the Hellenic Foreign Trade Board in Athens over four New York and Chicago agencies that competed for the two-year contract. The Athens board represents 24 olive oil producers.The contract calls for Trahan not only to promote all olive oil produced in Greece, but individual brands as well.
BUSINESS
By John Woodruff and John Woodruff,Sun Staff Writer | July 8, 1994
With 4,000 gallons already being unloaded here and 8,000 more at sea, Olex U.S.A. Corp. opened headquarters in the World Trade Center yesterday and set out to make Baltimore the East Coast capital of Catalonian extra-virgin olive oil.With Americans increasingly health-conscious and U.S. olive oil sales growing by 15 percent or more for each of the past seven years, the company is taking aim at a share of the industrialized world's fastest-growing market for...
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | October 8, 2000
Q. One of your readers described how eating hot salsa gave her relief from psoriasis. My solution is a little different, but equally unusual. I suffered from scalp psoriasis for years. This skin condition is hereditary in my family, and the scales covered my entire head. I got no relief from prescription medicine, so I tried every oil you can imagine: cooking oil, soybean oil and olive oil. The extra-virgin olive oil did the trick. In two months there was a noticeable difference, and within six months all my scales had disappeared, except for a tiny patch over each ear. What a relief!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
Chef Scott Ryan might be the rare person who did not have a scarring experience with beets as a child. The instructor at Baltimore's Stratford University culinary school was on his honeymoon in Paris when he and his wife packed a picnic that included beets marinated in fresh fennel, lemon and olive oil. It was love at first bite. "I think that many people have bad experiences with food - canned this or canned that - and they don't understand its true nature," said Ryan. "Beets fall into that category.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
Baltimore's Sip & Bite restaurant is one of the restaurants featured in Guy Fieri's new book, "Diners, Drive-ins and Dives: The Funky Finds in Flavortown," in which Fieri takes readers back to some of his favorite finds from recent seasons of his long-running Food Network show. Apparently Fieri really had a good time at the Sip & Bite .  "I'm not allowed to watch the rerun of Sip & Bite because I fall off my chair laughing," Fieri writes in the new book. "These guys are some of the funniest people I've met in my Triple D travels.
NEWS
For The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
If you won't be in the Grandstand at Pimlico, you can still celebrate the 138th running of the Preakness Stakes in style with a black-and-gold party. Black and gold — the colors of the Calvert family — pop up everywhere at the Preakness, from the state flag to the winner's wreath of black-eyed Susans. Recreate that feeling at home with black and gold stacks of polenta, goat cheese and olives, deep brown chocolate bread pudding with a gold topping, and Black & Tans, a fruity cocktail with turn-of-the-century Maryland roots.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2013
A recipe for Irish boxty, courtesy of Slainte chef Chris Marquis: 1 1/2  cups grated raw potato 1 cup  flour 1 cup leftover mashed potatoes 1 egg 1 Tablespoon skim milk olive oil salt and pepper Toss the grated potatoes with flour in a large bowl. Stir in mashed potatoes until combined. In a separate bowl, whisk together the egg and skim milk; mix into the potatoes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 25, 2013
New research has found that the Mediterranean diet is linked to a healthy heart. The diet is rich in vegetables, fish, olive oil and nuts. Thinking of switching or adopting some of the principals of the diet? Here is a Mediterranean diet recipe from the Mayo Clinic to get you started. Have a healthy recipe you'd like to share? Send it to andrea.walker@baltsun.com. Ingredients 1 small eggplant, peeled, cut into 1/4-inch slices 1 small yellow zucchini, cut into 1/4-inch slices 1 small green zucchini, cut into 1/4-inch slices 6 medium mushrooms, sliced 1 sweet red pepper, seeded, cored and cut into chunks 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil 6 cups water 1 1/2 cups coarse polenta (corn grits)
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | December 5, 2012
Even those of us who enjoy the intimacy (and challenge) of sit-down-style dinner parties like the more informal holiday gatherings that revolve around appetizers and desserts for larger get-togethers. The host gets to strut a greater variety of interesting edibles than he usually whips up, and the guests get to mingle while enjoying each other's company and what are essentially finger foods. Another virtue of an appetizer and dessert party is that the "menu" can be eclectic, drawing inspiration from world cuisines in offerings that can appeal to virtually any tastes.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | November 20, 2005
Nobody was better positioned for the great U.S. olive oil boom of the 1980s and 1990s than Pompeian Inc. Its oil, imported, blended and bottled on Baltimore's Pulaski Highway, was No. 1 in the United States a quarter-century back. Olive oil was about to be revealed as a source of healthy hearts and culinary delight, and sales were going to boom. But obscure young Brooklynite Bill Monroe stepped in front of the Pompeian parade. Monroe went to work for Italy's Bertolli family in 1981, played the olive oil craze like a Cremona fiddle, made Bertolli oil No. 1 in America and knocked Pompeian down to No. 4, with less than a fifth the sales of its rival.
FEATURES
By Sheryl Julian and Sheryl Julian,Boston Globe | February 7, 1993
Americans love the idea that a single food will cure what ails them, a fact that olive oil promoters have seized upon. People looking to reduce their risk of heart disease, they say, should use olive oil in place of other oils -- a position debated by health educators, nutritionists, scientists and policy-makers at a recent conference in Cambridge, Mass., on the benefits of the Mediterranean diet.The three-day 1993 International Conference on the Diets of the Mediterranean, at the Hyatt Regency Hotel, was sponsored by Oldways Preservation & Exchange Trust, a Boston organization, and the Harvard School of Public Health, with support from members of the International Olive Oil Council.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
This potato salad recipe bucks the usual drenched-in-mayo stereotype — and that's a good thing. It's vegan (and gluten-free), but don't let that steer you away. You can't beat the flavor, thanks to a dressing with a base of apple cider vinegar, olive oil, red onion, herbs and more. My husband's cousin Coco, who blogs at http://www.operagirlcooks.com , developed the recipe to be served warm, which is outstanding. But the few times we've had leftovers, we've enjoyed it chilled, too. The flavors intensify as it sits, so if you make it ahead for a tailgate party or other event and chill it overnight, it's just as good.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, For The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
Chicken is everywhere, from road-side shacks to four-star restaurants. The problem with chicken these days is that it has been bred more for quantity than quality. Luckily in the past few years, local farmers have been producing chickens that have amazing flavor and texture (and that are raised in much better conditions than typical supermarket birds). At the farmers markets around the area, chicken is one of the easier products to find now that most vegetables are out of season. This recipe is perfect for the cold weather.
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