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Olive Branch

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NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | April 14, 1991
You can't blame General Assembly leaders for reacting cautiously when Gov. William Donald Schaefer extends an olive branch -- he always tries to jab them first with razor-edged thorns.That's what happened at the traditional post-session bill signing ceremony last week. Yes, the goveror called for a peace pact to "put the past behind us." He conceded it had been a "tough session" (and a losing one for him) but "as of today, we move ahead" because "the ship of state must not flounder."Of course, that was after he assailed legislators for having "dedicated themselves to embarrassing" his administration even though "they knew our initiatives were right."
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NEWS
January 3, 2012
American officials are welcoming a Taliban statement that the Afghan insurgents will set up an office in the Persian Gulf state of Qatar. The move is being seen as a first step toward peace talks aimed at reconciling the Taliban and the Western-backed government of Afghan President Hamid Karzai, something the U.S. has long sought to broker. A serious offer to negotiate would mark not only a departure from the group's previous refusal to engage in talks but also ease concerns over the scheduled withdrawal of U.S. and NATO troops from the country by 2014.
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NEWS
By FRANK HARRIS III | January 18, 1993
West Haven, Connecticut. -- Cub Scout Pack 7, in my hometown of Waukegan, Illinois, was all-black, but even in the 1960s when the civil-rights movement was in full swing, our scout leaders never discussed anything other than scouting. Something my den mother said nearly 30 years ago, however, touches on two of the most renowned black leaders and their role in history.One is Martin Luther King, whose birthday our nation officially honors today for the eighth time as a national holiday. The other is Malcolm X, whose image and ideas have received the greater exposure in the past year.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2011
Republican Gov. Robert McDonnell of Virginia made no secret about who he thought should win Maryland's 2010 gubernatorial campaign. It wasn't Martin O'Malley. Yet two months after O'Malley, a Democrat, sailed to victory, McDonnell showed up in Annapolis to attend the inauguration. Virginia's governor even praised the man he worked to defeat, calling O'Malley "a very smart guy" who "obviously had a record of accomplishments. " McDonnell's decision to extend the olive branch — and O'Malley's to take it — underscores a relationship between the two men that aides say has been cordial, even friendly at times.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 2004
When we asked our server at Olive Branch to recommend a few dishes, he said he couldn't afford the food, even with his 25 percent employee discount, and therefore couldn't suggest anything. Like the other servers, he usually eats chicken tenders, he told us. Clearly, this was way more information than we needed. But if you're reading this, Mr. Server, I have good news. After working my way through pastas in gooey sauces, steaks wrapped in bacon, and dry desserts that had recently emerged from a freezer, the chicken tenders sound downright inviting.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 17, 2002
AQRABA, West Bank - The first rain needed to wash the summer dust off the green leaves had not yet fallen. The fruit was still green, not the ripe color of bluish-black. When squeezed, the precious oil did not easily ooze out. It was too early to pick the olives. But Khariah Zayaier was in a hurry. He must harvest his olives before the shooting season begins. Perched in a scraggly olive tree that he thinks dates to Roman times, Zayaier grabbed a branch and stripped off the olives in a downward motion.
NEWS
April 8, 2002
Wilbur J. Seidel, a retired supervisor of the Naval Academy tailor shop, died Monday of pneumonia at Oakbridge Nursing Home in Lakeland, Fla. He was 96. Born and raised in South Baltimore, Mr. Seidel grew up working in his family's dry-cleaning store while earning his high school diploma in night school. He later moved to Brooklyn Park. After the family sold the business in 1951, Mr. Seidel worked as a tailor for Raleigh Clothes before moving on to the Naval Academy Midshipmen's Tailor Shop.
FEATURES
By Judy Markey and Judy Markey,United Feature Syndicate | March 27, 1991
A RECENT STUDY reveals that in 40 percent of households, the woman usually apologizes first. Thus, if you work through a series of advanced mathematical extrapolations, you can only conclude that in 60 percent of the households, the man usually apologizes first.Therefore, in order to close the apology gap, today we offer women a brief lesson in the delicate art of saying you are (wince) sorry. Let us begin with the basic premise: Whenever you apologize, you want to simply APPEAR to be extending the olive branch.
NEWS
April 10, 2003
State will suffer because Busch sabotaged slots Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. was elected on a platform of reform to raise funds in a manner different from the typical Democratic cry of "tax, tax, tax" - which we heard until we were all ready to move out of this state ("Assembly ends with fiscal crisis unresolved," April 8). His plan was to use slot machine gambling - an already popular activity for which thousands of Marylanders travel to Delaware, West Virginia and Atlantic City, N.J., each week - as an alternative to the legislature digging in our pockets.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | February 20, 2002
I DIDN'T READ this one in Police Blotter or see it on Animal Planet, but it's a good story anyway. Peggy Coffman, an Ohio handler of hounds, was in New York recently for the 126th Westminster Kennel Club Show. While there, she told the Associated Press of an experience with Baltimore police in October. Coffman said officers summoned her from a restaurant here to ask about the license plates on her van: "AFGHAN1." Cops had the van surrounded and the officers, Coffman told the AP, "wanted to know what that was all about."
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | May 20, 2007
Seeking to bridge a recent history of suspicion, environmentalists and smart-growth activists are reaching out to hunters and anglers in Western Maryland, trying to enlist them in public debates about the development of the mountainous, mostly rural region. It's an unusual overture. Hunters, in particular, fear that "tree huggers," as they sometimes call environmental activists, want to ban firearms or hunting for sport. But with a 4,300-home development proposed near a state forest in Allegany County and a new highway project skirting another state-owned hunting area, activists see the region's many anglers and hunters as potential allies if alerted to how development could hamper their favorite outdoor activities.
NEWS
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | April 27, 2006
WASHINGTON -- It will be two weeks before Tony Snow, the conservative radio host President Bush named yesterday to be his new press secretary, officially becomes the public face of the administration. But Snow, a former White House speechwriter and Fox News broadcaster, started the first task in his daunting new job right away. Wandering back to the dingy briefing room where correspondents had just heard official news of his hiring, Snow chatted and joked with reporters, quietly kicking off a charm offensive designed to show that he is not a Bush drone.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | July 22, 2005
WASHINGTON - Woody Allen once said something about how 80 percent of life is just showing up. At the time, I had no idea of what the heck he was driving at. The world of politics has helped me to understand. A good example of Mr. Allen's wisdom is offered by Republican National Committee Chairman Ken Mehlman's speech to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's convention in Milwaukee last week. That he showed up gave prominent voices from both political extremes something to hate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 2004
When we asked our server at Olive Branch to recommend a few dishes, he said he couldn't afford the food, even with his 25 percent employee discount, and therefore couldn't suggest anything. Like the other servers, he usually eats chicken tenders, he told us. Clearly, this was way more information than we needed. But if you're reading this, Mr. Server, I have good news. After working my way through pastas in gooey sauces, steaks wrapped in bacon, and dry desserts that had recently emerged from a freezer, the chicken tenders sound downright inviting.
NEWS
April 10, 2003
State will suffer because Busch sabotaged slots Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. was elected on a platform of reform to raise funds in a manner different from the typical Democratic cry of "tax, tax, tax" - which we heard until we were all ready to move out of this state ("Assembly ends with fiscal crisis unresolved," April 8). His plan was to use slot machine gambling - an already popular activity for which thousands of Marylanders travel to Delaware, West Virginia and Atlantic City, N.J., each week - as an alternative to the legislature digging in our pockets.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 14, 2003
WASHINGTON - If North Korea dismantles its nuclear weapons program, the Bush administration is ready to revive an offer of economic relations and a formal end to the Korean War as a way to help transform ties with that impoverished state, U.S. officials said yesterday. But the White House was quick to insist that it would not reward North Korea for dropping its belligerent stance. Officials said they were not offering fresh incentives, only reviving previous offers that were lifted after North Korea acknowledged in October that it has a nuclear weapons program.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | October 11, 1992
Despite the fact that she has been successfully buying furniture since the 1940s, Dorothy McIlvain Scott still remembers the one that got away.It was in the 1960s, and she was in New York to look at a piece that was up for auction. "It was a Townsend-Goddard highboy [originally] from the Hunter house at Newport. It was in terrible condition, so I thought maybe people wouldn't bid high. But they did -- it went for $104,000, and when I got back to the [hotel] that night I got a call from my mother, and she said, 'You didn't do it, did you?
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | December 16, 1994
ROSEMONT, Ill. -- Major-league owners let another deadline go by without carrying out their threat to declare an impasse in baseball's protracted labor dispute, voting instead to authorize unilateral implementation of their salary cap proposal if an agreement is not reached in the next week.The vote was 25-3, with the Orioles, New York Mets and Toronto Blue Jays voicing disapproval for a management strategy that can be viewed from two very different perspectives.The owners are calling it an olive branch, a last-ditch effort to convince the Major League Baseball Players Association that implementation is the last resort rather than the master plan.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 16, 2002
TIME FLIES, things happen, people change. We accumulate baggage. We jettison baggage and gather up more. We pick up scars and regrets. Scars heal and disappear; regrets might vanish but they also might live inside like an ulcer. Some of us roll on faster than others -- free and happy, focused on good memories. Some of us have to chop through the jungle of the conscience before getting to life's slightly better place. It's different for everyone, and sometimes out of the night someone somewhere gets the idea to settle old business.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 17, 2002
AQRABA, West Bank - The first rain needed to wash the summer dust off the green leaves had not yet fallen. The fruit was still green, not the ripe color of bluish-black. When squeezed, the precious oil did not easily ooze out. It was too early to pick the olives. But Khariah Zayaier was in a hurry. He must harvest his olives before the shooting season begins. Perched in a scraggly olive tree that he thinks dates to Roman times, Zayaier grabbed a branch and stripped off the olives in a downward motion.
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