Advertisement
HomeCollectionsOlestra
IN THE NEWS

Olestra

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | March 22, 1996
Procter & Gamble Co. said it will build a $150 million plant in Cincinnati to make its new no-fat, no-calorie fat substitute, olestra.The factory, to be constructed at P&G's Ivorydale manufacturing complex, is scheduled for completion by early 1999, the company said. In the meantime, P&G said it will make olestra, under the brand name Olean, at a test-market production plant at Ivorydale.Procter & Gamble, the largest U.S. consumer products company, won approval Jan. 24 from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to begin using olestra, a sugar and vegetable oil combination with molecules too large for the body to absorb, in salty snacks.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 3, 1997
Adolphus "Doc" Cheatham, 91, a jazz trumpeter who played with such legends as Benny Goodman and Billie Holiday and later had a long solo career, died in his sleep at George Washington University Hospital yesterday after suffering a stroke in his hotel room Sunday in Washington. He had completed a three-night stand Saturday at Blues Alley there.During a seven-decade career, he played in countless jazz clubs and big bands, and accompanied such artists as blues singer Bessie Smith in the 1920s.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1996
It looks like a potato chip, it tastes like a potato chip, it crunches like a potato chip, it leaves grease on your fingers just like a potato chip.But underneath this snack's commonplace exterior is a potential marketplace bombshell. For this little chip is fried in olestra, a fat substitute that offers no fat and half the calories of regular chips."It tastes just as you would expect a potato chip to taste," said Jane Schultz, vice president of communications for the Snack Food Association in Alexandria, Va.Some in the food and nutrition industries caution that olestra is not a substitute for eating a healthy diet, and some people have concerns about possible ill effects from eating it.And some critics, like Marion Nestle, professor and chair of the Department of Nutrition and Food Studies at New York University and a former member of the FDA's advisory panel on new foods, say it's "totally useless."
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | November 26, 1996
BOSTON -- I am careening through the supermarket, speed-shopping down my Thanksgiving list, when I arrive at the poultry aisle. A vast landscape of turkeys stretches down the 50-yard chiller.Before me lie tons of turkey, boulders of birds, glistening piles of plastic-wrapped, plucked and prepared poultry. These domestic creatures bred to elephantine proportions are lined up breast-by-breast waiting for the customers.I have come fowling, as the Pilgrims described their hunt, for the requisite creature, a bird bearing 25 pounds of flesh on its bones.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 2, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A consumer group has asked the Food and Drug Administration to withdraw approval of a fat substitute, olestra, on the basis of a study that found that 20 percent of people who ate chips made with the product had gastrointestinal problems, 3 percent of them severe.The Center for Science in the Public Interest, which hired a market research firm to conduct the study in the three test markets where the potato and tortilla chips are being sold by Frito-Lay, has also asked the company to remove the product from the market.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 9, 1996
And now, the newest controversy on the frontier of low-fat food: the battle of the dueling olestra hot lines.A consumer group announced yesterday that it had established a toll-free hot line, 1-888-OLESTRA, to field complaints from customers who say they are suffering ill health from eating products made with olestra, the fat substitute made by Procter & Gamble Co. and marketed under the Olean brand name.But Frito-Lay Inc., the unit of Pepsico Inc. that has been test-marketing Olean-rich chips in three cities, shot back that it had already established its own toll-free hot line: 1-800-483-7486.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 31, 1996
DO POTATO CHIPS cooked in the new fat substitute, olestra, taste like good, greasy potato chips?No way! Get real! Nuh-unh! That, in various forms of local language, is the negative conclusion reached by a panel of enthusiastic potato chip eaters from Baltimore. The panel consisted of myself and seven boys, ranging in age from 10 to 15. We ate the chips the way Americans are supposed to, while we were stretched out in front of a TV.The chips and other products using the fat substitute won't be in grocery stores for several months.
NEWS
June 3, 1997
Adolphus "Doc" Cheatham, 91, a jazz trumpeter who played with such legends as Benny Goodman and Billie Holiday and later had a long solo career, died in his sleep at George Washington University Hospital yesterday after suffering a stroke in his hotel room Sunday in Washington. He had completed a three-night stand Saturday at Blues Alley there.During a seven-decade career, he played in countless jazz clubs and big bands, and accompanied such artists as blues singer Bessie Smith in the 1920s.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 9, 1996
Olean, aka Olestra, the nonfat fat currently being test-marketed in several areas of the country, is causing a stir in Washington. Michael Jacobson of the Center for Science in the Public Interest has petitioned the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to withdraw its recent approval and get Olean-fried products off the market.What's all the fuss about?Indigestible Olestra was accidentally discovered by Procter & Gamble (P&G) scientists in the 1960s while hunting for easily digestible fats for premature infants.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | November 26, 1996
BOSTON -- I am careening through the supermarket, speed-shopping down my Thanksgiving list, when I arrive at the poultry aisle. A vast landscape of turkeys stretches down the 50-yard chiller.Before me lie tons of turkey, boulders of birds, glistening piles of plastic-wrapped, plucked and prepared poultry. These domestic creatures bred to elephantine proportions are lined up breast-by-breast waiting for the customers.I have come fowling, as the Pilgrims described their hunt, for the requisite creature, a bird bearing 25 pounds of flesh on its bones.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 9, 1996
Olean, aka Olestra, the nonfat fat currently being test-marketed in several areas of the country, is causing a stir in Washington. Michael Jacobson of the Center for Science in the Public Interest has petitioned the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to withdraw its recent approval and get Olean-fried products off the market.What's all the fuss about?Indigestible Olestra was accidentally discovered by Procter & Gamble (P&G) scientists in the 1960s while hunting for easily digestible fats for premature infants.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 2, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A consumer group has asked the Food and Drug Administration to withdraw approval of a fat substitute, olestra, on the basis of a study that found that 20 percent of people who ate chips made with the product had gastrointestinal problems, 3 percent of them severe.The Center for Science in the Public Interest, which hired a market research firm to conduct the study in the three test markets where the potato and tortilla chips are being sold by Frito-Lay, has also asked the company to remove the product from the market.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 9, 1996
And now, the newest controversy on the frontier of low-fat food: the battle of the dueling olestra hot lines.A consumer group announced yesterday that it had established a toll-free hot line, 1-888-OLESTRA, to field complaints from customers who say they are suffering ill health from eating products made with olestra, the fat substitute made by Procter & Gamble Co. and marketed under the Olean brand name.But Frito-Lay Inc., the unit of Pepsico Inc. that has been test-marketing Olean-rich chips in three cities, shot back that it had already established its own toll-free hot line: 1-800-483-7486.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | March 22, 1996
Procter & Gamble Co. said it will build a $150 million plant in Cincinnati to make its new no-fat, no-calorie fat substitute, olestra.The factory, to be constructed at P&G's Ivorydale manufacturing complex, is scheduled for completion by early 1999, the company said. In the meantime, P&G said it will make olestra, under the brand name Olean, at a test-market production plant at Ivorydale.Procter & Gamble, the largest U.S. consumer products company, won approval Jan. 24 from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to begin using olestra, a sugar and vegetable oil combination with molecules too large for the body to absorb, in salty snacks.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 31, 1996
DO POTATO CHIPS cooked in the new fat substitute, olestra, taste like good, greasy potato chips?No way! Get real! Nuh-unh! That, in various forms of local language, is the negative conclusion reached by a panel of enthusiastic potato chip eaters from Baltimore. The panel consisted of myself and seven boys, ranging in age from 10 to 15. We ate the chips the way Americans are supposed to, while we were stretched out in front of a TV.The chips and other products using the fat substitute won't be in grocery stores for several months.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1996
It looks like a potato chip, it tastes like a potato chip, it crunches like a potato chip, it leaves grease on your fingers just like a potato chip.But underneath this snack's commonplace exterior is a potential marketplace bombshell. For this little chip is fried in olestra, a fat substitute that offers no fat and half the calories of regular chips."It tastes just as you would expect a potato chip to taste," said Jane Schultz, vice president of communications for the Snack Food Association in Alexandria, Va.Some in the food and nutrition industries caution that olestra is not a substitute for eating a healthy diet, and some people have concerns about possible ill effects from eating it.And some critics, like Marion Nestle, professor and chair of the Department of Nutrition and Food Studies at New York University and a former member of the FDA's advisory panel on new foods, say it's "totally useless."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 25, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the new fat substitute Olestra yesterday for use in such salty-type snack foods as potato chips and crackers, a decision that is likely to open the door to future uses in a wide range of foods.While Olestra has the taste and texture of fat, it adds no fat or calories. However, it also has been associated with some unpleasant side effects, including abdominal cramping, diarrhea-like symptoms and the depletion of important nutrients from the body.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2003
The potato-chip maker that bet its customers they couldn't "eat just one" now is trying to appeal to customer fears of being fat. In response to growing concerns about obesity, Frito-Lay Inc. is trumpeting a new, healthier chip that lacks trans fat, dubbed the "bad fat" by nutritionists. The Plano, Texas-based company is cooking its Lay's potato chips, Doritos, Fritos, Ruffles, Tostitos and Cheetos in oils that contain no trans fats. It began marketing the change this week in full-page advertisements in dozens of major newspapers and Hispanic publications.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 25, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the new fat substitute Olestra yesterday for use in such salty-type snack foods as potato chips and crackers, a decision that is likely to open the door to future uses in a wide range of foods.While Olestra has the taste and texture of fat, it adds no fat or calories. However, it also has been associated with some unpleasant side effects, including abdominal cramping, diarrhea-like symptoms and the depletion of important nutrients from the body.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.