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By Michael Pakenham | November 12, 1995
"Last Call at the 7-Eleven: Fine Dining at 2 a.m., the Search for Spandex People and Other Reasons to Go On Living," by Kevin Cowherd. Bancroft Press. 234 pages. $19.95"Violent Screen: A Critic's 13 Years on the Front Lines of Movie Mayhem," by Stephen Hunter. Bancroft Press. 305 pages. $19.95"Michael Olesker's Baltimore: If You Live Here, You're Home," Johns Hopkins University Press. 221 pages. $22.95 These volumes, now coming on the market, contain much of the best of the work of three of The Sun's staff writers.
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NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | February 16, 2006
A three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals handed The Sun a defeat yesterday in its lawsuit against Maryland Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. that challenged his ban on talking with two Sun reporters. The judges affirmed a lower court decision that rejected the newspaper's claim that the reporters' First Amendment rights had been violated by an Ehrlich order, issued Nov. 18, 2004. It banned state executive branch employees from speaking with Sun reporter David Nitkin and columnist Michael Olesker, who has since left the paper.
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FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | December 13, 2002
Officials at WJZ-TV have dismissed Michael Olesker, the station's commentator for the past 19 years, saying the savings were needed to pay for added staff for a new afternoon newscast. "The job of part-time commentator is being eliminated as part of a bigger strategy," said WJZ spokeswoman Liz Chuday. "The resources [are] already being reinvested in more crews and reporters gathering news on the street." She noted recent ratings advances by the station as proof of the wisdom of the move.
NEWS
By PAUL MOORE and PAUL MOORE,PUBLIC EDITOR | February 5, 2006
Credibility is the essential ingredient in ensuring that The Sun achieves its goal to be the most trusted source of news and information for its readers. As public editor, I am charged with analyzing and explaining how journalistic practices can affect that credibility. This column addresses the ethical problems that arise when journalists expropriate, without proper attribution or acknowledgment, unique reporting or writing produced by others. It has been argued that journalists routinely borrow freely from others at their newspapers or other news organizations.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2004
The Ehrlich administration acknowledged yesterday that Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele had a conversation with Sun columnist Michael Olesker at Pimlico Race Course in May -- a reversal after the administration had been saying for several days that no such conversation occurred. Also yesterday, two national journalism organizations joined The Sun in protesting Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s order that bans state officials from speaking with Olesker and Sun State House Bureau Chief David Nitkin.
NEWS
By PAUL MOORE and PAUL MOORE,PUBLIC EDITOR | January 8, 2006
Last week, Sun columnist Michael Olesker resigned, ending a 27-year career at the newspaper after being confronted with evidence that he had used material from other newspapers without attribution. Olesker is a gifted writer and a passionate advocate, with many friends within the paper and across the Baltimore region. He is also a controversial figure with powerful enemies, including the governor of Maryland and his administration. His sudden departure has prompted a stormy response in the community, with critics taunting the paper, saying it proves their claims of his and The Sun's bias, and with others claiming that The Sun has knuckled under to political pressure.
NEWS
September 27, 1998
Bill Clinton put his finger in our faces and liedI read with incredulity the headline over Michael Olesker's Sept. 15 column, "Clinton lied, but let's not throw him out over sex life."Had he read his own paper, he would know about the generals who, under the Clinton regime, were forced out of the service -- even reduced in grade -- because of their relationships with consenting adults.He would have read about the witch hunt of any number of congressional, civic and professional people chased from office because of their peccadilloes.
NEWS
July 23, 2001
State faces needs more pressing than a better Oriole Park Maryland's public mental health system is facing a $30 million budget shortfall for the fiscal year that began July 1. I took mass transit to Artscape. And while we did not have as many problems as others did, I want to ask that next year the organizers try to encourage the state to open the Metro subway on Sunday. When so many people are encouraged to take mass transit to the festival, it is funny that the only option available on Sunday is the light rail.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and Eric Siegel and JoAnna Daemmrich and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff Writers | May 31, 1995
A Jewish anti-hate group accused Baltimore Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III of "crude racial scapegoating" yesterday and demanded his immediate ouster.Reacting to Mr. Henson's remarks in The Sun blaming the decline of Park Heights on the flight of whites and Jews, People Against Hate said he was "promoting the politics of racial divisiveness" and delivered a petition to City Hall seeking his resignation.An indignant Mr. Henson denied making the comments attributed to him Sunday in The Sun and branded the reporting "offensive and reprehensible."
NEWS
By PAUL MOORE and PAUL MOORE,PUBLIC EDITOR | February 5, 2006
Credibility is the essential ingredient in ensuring that The Sun achieves its goal to be the most trusted source of news and information for its readers. As public editor, I am charged with analyzing and explaining how journalistic practices can affect that credibility. This column addresses the ethical problems that arise when journalists expropriate, without proper attribution or acknowledgment, unique reporting or writing produced by others. It has been argued that journalists routinely borrow freely from others at their newspapers or other news organizations.
NEWS
By PAUL MOORE and PAUL MOORE,PUBLIC EDITOR | January 8, 2006
Last week, Sun columnist Michael Olesker resigned, ending a 27-year career at the newspaper after being confronted with evidence that he had used material from other newspapers without attribution. Olesker is a gifted writer and a passionate advocate, with many friends within the paper and across the Baltimore region. He is also a controversial figure with powerful enemies, including the governor of Maryland and his administration. His sudden departure has prompted a stormy response in the community, with critics taunting the paper, saying it proves their claims of his and The Sun's bias, and with others claiming that The Sun has knuckled under to political pressure.
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | January 4, 2006
Michael Olesker, a columnist for 27 years at The Sun, resigned yesterday amid allegations that he had used sentences and paragraphs from other newspapers in some of his columns without attribution. "I made mistakes," said Olesker, clearly dejected, as he began cleaning out his desk in The Sun's newsroom. "I would never take somebody else's work and call it my own. I have always tried to serve my readers as honorably as possible. In the current climate, with so many political eyes staring at me and this newspaper, I feel it's in everyone's best interest for me to resign."
NEWS
December 27, 2005
Michael Olesker is on vacation.
NEWS
November 3, 2005
Judge shows sense in land-use rulings I write in response to the editorial that takes issue with two rulings on land use by Carroll County Circuit Court Judge Michael M. Galloway ("Common-sense growth," Oct. 28). I have no argument with the statement that the current Board of County Commissioners was elected, at least in part, to correct some decisions allowing too much growth by past boards. However, there must be a sense of balance, and the county's view of how to enforce its new adequate public facilities ordinance has swung the pendulum too far in the other direction.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2004
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. agreed yesterday to meet with top executives of The Sun to talk about his directive ordering state employees not to talk to two Sun journalists. The Ehrlich administration sent out an e-mail three weeks ago forbidding state employees from talking to Sun State House Bureau Chief David Nitkin and columnist Michael Olesker, whose coverage, Ehrlich asserted, had included falsehoods. Last week, The Sun filed a lawsuit asking a federal judge to lift the ban. The meeting is set for 4 p.m. Dec. 17 in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2004
Lawyers and legal scholars were divided yesterday as to whether Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s ban on two Sun journalists is legally permissible or an unconstitutional abuse of his executive power. More than two weeks ago, Ehrlich ordered state officials to stop talking to two of the newspaper's journalists, saying the reporter and columnist failed to report on his administration fairly. On Friday, The Sun, joined by State House Bureau Chief David Nitkin and columnist Michael Olesker, sued Ehrlich and two of his press representatives in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, alleging the governor's actions violated the First Amendment.
NEWS
October 7, 2001
College Park campus not as Olesker recalls it It is clear from the tone of Michael Olesker's column ("College Park needs lesson from N.Y. on community," Sept. 27) that he has not set foot on the campus in some time. Mr. Olesker spends a great deal of time describing the campus as he remembers it from sometime in the long past, but he shows no understanding of the changes and improvements that have occurred there since. Like Mr. Olesker, I was at Maryland when every state graduate could attend with a "C" average and most of the student body commuted from off campus because there was a lack of available housing on campus.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2004
Pointing to the First Amendment and the rights of journalists to obtain information, lawyers for The Sun formally asked Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. yesterday to lift a ban that forbids state officials from speaking with a reporter and a columnist at the paper. In a letter faxed to the governor's office yesterday afternoon, lawyers for Tribune Co., which owns The Sun, called the ban "unconstitutional on its face" and in violation of free speech protections that guarantee equal treatment for all members of the news media.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2004
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. said yesterday that his directive preventing state officials from speaking with two journalists at The Sun was "meant to have a chilling effect" on "two writers who have no credibility." Speaking on a WBAL radio program yesterday morning, the governor said the ban was intended to draw a line in the sand and set a benchmark for the minimum level of accuracy he expects in newspaper coverage of his administration. "At what point does a monopoly newspaper abuse its privilege, its First Amendment privilege, in making things up, making quotes up, making context up?"
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