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By Joe Gergen and Joe Gergen,Newsday | August 3, 1993
There is nothing distinctive about the batter's stance. He doesn't crouch low or hold his hands exceedingly high as he stands at the plate awaiting the pitch. John Olerud doesn't wave the bat with special vigor or aim it in menacing fashion at the pitcher.Indeed, the man expends so little energy at the moment of truth for a hitter he has been accused of being comatose. The perception lasts as long as it takes the pitch to arrive in the strike zone. Olerud's bat invariably is there to meet it and send it to distant parts of the ballpark.
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By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2004
NEW YORK - John Olerud underwent a magnetic resonance imaging exam on his left foot yesterday, and New York Yankees manager Joe Torre said the first baseman injured in Game 3 wouldn't be available for the rest of the American League Championship Series, and that his availability for the World Series was in doubt. "We'll have to wait for the results (of the MRI)," Torre said. Torre has said he will not put Jason Giambi on the playoff roster, even with Olerud injured. Giambi went 4-for-33 after returning from a long absence with a benign tumor, and he's still not strong enough to play regularly.
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SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | October 22, 1992
TORONTO -- It was almost as if Jimmy Key got three going-away presents here last night -- just in case he was pitching his last game for the Toronto Blue Jays.There has been widespread speculation that Key, who is eligible for free agency this year, will not be re-signed. If that is the case, then he left a lasting impression by pitching 7 2/3 masterful innings in a tense 2-1 win over the Atlanta Braves in Game 4 of the World Series.It didn't go unappreciated -- by the 52,090 spectators in attendance, third baseman Kelly Gruber or first baseman John Olerud.
SPORTS
By JOE CHRISTENSEN and JOE CHRISTENSEN,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2004
BOSTON M-y With last yearM-Fs Grady Little saga still fresh in the criticsM-F minds, Boston Red Sox manager Terry Francona could face an offseason of scrutiny for the decisions made in this American League Championship Seri e s , especially Game 3. The result Saturday was a 19-8 drubbing, but the score was tied 6-6 after the third inning, when Francona was searching for someone, anyone, who could get the New York Yankees out. Starter Bronson Arroyo was...
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | June 29, 1993
John Olerud and this season are both probably too young to talk seriously about hitting .400, but the conversation doesn't have to end with that subject.At the age of 24, the Toronto Blue Jays first baseman is putting up numbers that represent a lot more than just the highest batting average in the American League. And if .406 (Olerud's current average) sounds familiar, it's because that's what Ted Williams hit in 1941, the last time anyone reached the magic mark.But, perhaps even more impressive to those who have watched his career blossom in the past four years, are the power ratings Olerud is compiling.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Steve Hirdt, Elias Sports Bureau.Staff Writer | June 30, 1993
Joe Carter would have predicted months ago that Toronto teammate John Olerud would be making a charge at a .400 batting average this late in the season, if anyone had bothered to ask.Sure, the glorified theories about weight distribution, positioning the hands on the bat or pitch selection might all apply to Olerud, the Blue Jays' first baseman. But so might Carter's thesis."He got married last winter. That's it. I'm serious," Carter said with a loud laugh the other night.But when Olerud, a .269 career hitter going into this season, sits down and thinks about what has propelled him to one of the most serious challenges to the hallowed .400 mark in 10 years, he agrees with Carter.
SPORTS
By Helene Elliott and Helene Elliott,Los Angeles Times | September 26, 1991
ANAHEIM, Calif. -- If the Toronto Blue Jays win the American League East championship, they will have the California Angels to thank for nudging them out of a slump.Yesterday, for the second successive game, the Blue Jays foiled the Angels' strategy of issuing an intentional walk to create a more favorable pitching matchup. And for the second successive game, timely hitting enabled Toronto to defeat one of the Angels' 17-game winners and distance itself from the Boston Red Sox.This time, John Olerud's three-run home run after an intentional walk to Candy Maldonado capped a six-run fifth inning and carried Toronto to a 7-2 rout of the Angels before 19,251 at Anaheim Stadium.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | March 17, 1994
Dunedin, Florida. -- In the cacophony of the Toronto Blue Jays clubhouse John Olerud is a fjord of Norwegian calm. He is a high-impact player with a low-intensity personality, an agreeable combination in an era when many athletes in other sports combine the opposite traits.When he was elected to play on last year's All-Star team he was asked if he would be nervous. ''Yes,'' he said. He was asked how it would show. ''It won't,'' he said. He is as angular and unprepossessing as the young Jimmy Stewart and as laconic as the young Henry Fonda.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | October 20, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- Miller Huggins, the manager of the peerless Yankee teams of Ruth and Gehrig, approached the Babe in the clubhouse before a World Series game years ago, carrying a stack of index cards with stats scrawled on them."
SPORTS
May 23, 2000
Quote: "We know we're going to go through probably 15 to 18 pitchers. It never fails. I don't like to think about it, but that's the reality of the situation." - pitching coach Joe Kerrigan of the Red Sox, who used 25 last year It's a fact: A woman dressed as Queen Victoria threw the ceremonial first pitch in Toronto on Victoria Day, a national holiday in Canada. Who's hot: The Mariners' John Olerud has reached base in eight consecutive at-bats. Who's not: Since opening the season 4-0, the Yankees' Orlando Hernandez is winless since April 23 and has four losses and a no-decision in his past five starts.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2004
NEW YORK - On a night the crowd repeatedly mocked Pedro Martinez with "Who's your daddy?" chant, he could have never guessed the answer would be a 34-year-old pitcher the New York Yankees kept on mothballs last year. Jon Lieber, who signed with the Yankees in January 2003 but missed that entire season while recovering from reconstructive elbow surgery, was the real story in Game 2 of the American League Championship Series. Lieber held the Boston Red Sox to one run on three hits over seven-plus innings, and New York did just enough damage against Martinez to secure a 3-1 victory last night before 56,136 at Yankee Stadium.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2003
SEATTLE - The sound of train whistles echoing in the background reminded the Orioles that they weren't in Oakland last night, that a road trip gone bad had once again changed locations. They probably were waiting to be tied to the tracks. It took until the ninth inning for them to become victims again. The Seattle Mariners scored three runs, the last two coming on John Olerud's bases-loaded single off B.J. Ryan, to post a 3-2 victory at Safeco Field and extend the Orioles' losing streak to six games.
SPORTS
May 23, 2000
Quote: "We know we're going to go through probably 15 to 18 pitchers. It never fails. I don't like to think about it, but that's the reality of the situation." - pitching coach Joe Kerrigan of the Red Sox, who used 25 last year It's a fact: A woman dressed as Queen Victoria threw the ceremonial first pitch in Toronto on Victoria Day, a national holiday in Canada. Who's hot: The Mariners' John Olerud has reached base in eight consecutive at-bats. Who's not: Since opening the season 4-0, the Yankees' Orlando Hernandez is winless since April 23 and has four losses and a no-decision in his past five starts.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1998
OAKLAND, Calif. -- Increasingly impatient with a four-week free fall that threatens to bury them before June, the Orioles have discussed a trade that would send second baseman Roberto Alomar and possibly first baseman Rafael Palmeiro to the New York Mets for a package including switch-hitting second baseman Carlos Baerga, club sources confirmed.Talks have been ongoing for about a week but are not close to the critical stage, according to a club source familiar with the discussions.The Orioles apparently would include Palmeiro if the Mets part with first baseman John Olerud and pitcher Dave Mlicki.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | March 17, 1994
Dunedin, Florida. -- In the cacophony of the Toronto Blue Jays clubhouse John Olerud is a fjord of Norwegian calm. He is a high-impact player with a low-intensity personality, an agreeable combination in an era when many athletes in other sports combine the opposite traits.When he was elected to play on last year's All-Star team he was asked if he would be nervous. ''Yes,'' he said. He was asked how it would show. ''It won't,'' he said. He is as angular and unprepossessing as the young Jimmy Stewart and as laconic as the young Henry Fonda.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | October 20, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- Miller Huggins, the manager of the peerless Yankee teams of Ruth and Gehrig, approached the Babe in the clubhouse before a World Series game years ago, carrying a stack of index cards with stats scrawled on them."
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2003
SEATTLE - The sound of train whistles echoing in the background reminded the Orioles that they weren't in Oakland last night, that a road trip gone bad had once again changed locations. They probably were waiting to be tied to the tracks. It took until the ninth inning for them to become victims again. The Seattle Mariners scored three runs, the last two coming on John Olerud's bases-loaded single off B.J. Ryan, to post a 3-2 victory at Safeco Field and extend the Orioles' losing streak to six games.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,Evening Sun Staff | October 4, 1990
Orioles righthander Ben McDonald worked into the ninth inning for the fourth time in his last five starts and finished with a career-high nine strikeouts. So, why didn't he get the win last night?Simple, pitching coach Al Jackson said.McDonald didn't throw his best fastball on his first pitch to John Olerud with one out in the eighth. The pitch was on the outside corner, but Olerud pulled a two-run homer to right, giving Toronto a 2-1 lead.The Orioles rallied for a 3-2 victory at Memorial Stadium in the last game of the season, after the Blue Jays knew they had finished second to Boston in the AL East.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer Staff writer Jim Henneman contributed to this article | October 20, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- The Toronto Blue Jays agonized for days over the designated hitter rule and the impact it might have on the outcome of the 90th World Series.It just isn't fair, said manager Cito Gaston, to make the American League team do without a key player in the National League city.It just isn't right, said general manager Pat Gillick, to have to play by a brand new set of rules at this point in the season.Somehow, it turned out all right anyway. Designated hitter Paul Molitor displaced batting champion John Olerud at first base and then proceeded to dispose of the Philadelphia Phillies.
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