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October 17, 2012
Oldfields School is offering a free concert series to the public. Bethany Yarrow and Rufus perform on Oct. 17 at 7 p.m. Rufus plays cello and Bethany sings in the style of her father, Peter Yarrow, of Peter, Paul and Mary. The second concert is Nov. 9 at 7 p.m. and features the Szyrner Brothers. Lukasz Szyrner plays cello and Maciej Szyrner plays piano. Their classical music will feature composers such as Debussy and Chopin. The final concert is Dec. 7 at 7 p.m. and features The Second Generation Bluegrass Band from Freeland.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
Mary K. McPherson, a retired private-school educator who had been on the faculty of Oldfields School and Bryn Mawr School, died Oct. 5 of cancer at Roland Park Place, where she had lived for the past decade. She was 89. Mary King McPherson was born and raised in Toronto, where she graduated from Havergal College, a private girls school. After earning a bachelor's degree from Trinity College, part of the University of Toronto, Miss McPherson served with the Women's Royal Canadian Service at Halifax, Nova Scotia, from 1944 to 1945.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 7, 2001
The Oldfields School in Glencoe has received a $7.4 million gift that ranks among the largest donations in the nation to a private girls schools, a school official said. The donation was made by Tammis Day, a member of the graduating class of 1969 who lives in Tampa, Fla. Day took a leadership role in the school's current capital campaign, which has an overall goal of $21 million by 2003, said Ret Talbot, director of publications and public relations. "Oldfields needs to quietly walk into this century prepared for the business of educating young women," Day, a poet, playwright and member of the board of a California-based family foundation, said in a prepared statement.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
Cara G. Becker, a Towson University student and entrepreneur whose spirit of volunteering began in her childhood, died Monday of leukemia at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Towson resident was 21. "In her young life, Cara Becker touched so many people, in such special ways, which is why 2,000 of them came to Baltimore Hebrew Congregation [on] New Year's Day to listen to Cara's favorite songs, to see her infectious smile and beautiful face on the video," said Richard Sher, the Baltimore broadcaster and longtime family friend.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1998
The chairman of the board of trustees of Oldfields School in Glencoe was among five men killed in a midair collision of two private planes Saturday near Atlanta.Marion H. "Chip" Allen, an Atlanta attorney, had served on the private girls' school board since 1991. He was chairman this year and was head of the search committee that chose a new headmistress last year.The 131-year-old boarding and day school has 190 students in grades eight through 12. Students are from 28 states and 12 foreign countries.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | December 27, 2002
George S. Swope Jr., an educator from Michigan, has been named head of Oldfields School in Glencoe, effective July 1. Swope, 52, head of the upper school at Cranbrook Schools in Bloomfield Hills, will replace Kathleen Jameson, who announced in March that she would leave at the end of the 2002-2003 school year. "Baltimore has a strong history and tradition of independent schools," Swope said yesterday. "I will have the opportunity to build on that tradition, helping with the total educational experience for the girls at Oldfields."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2012
Dr. Gloria Lea Bledsoe, a retired Baltimore County guidance counselor who established an Oldfields School early-childhood education program, died of cancer May 30 at Glen Meadows Assisted Living. She was 85 and lived in Towson for many years. Born Gloria Lea Whittle in Baltimore and raised on LaPaix Lane, she was a 1945 graduate of Notre Dame Preparatory School. After raising her family, she began teaching at Oldfields School in 1979. She established a nursery school along with an early-childhood education program, family members said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
Mary K. McPherson, a retired private-school educator who had been on the faculty of Oldfields School and Bryn Mawr School, died Oct. 5 of cancer at Roland Park Place, where she had lived for the past decade. She was 89. Mary King McPherson was born and raised in Toronto, where she graduated from Havergal College, a private girls school. After earning a bachelor's degree from Trinity College, part of the University of Toronto, Miss McPherson served with the Women's Royal Canadian Service at Halifax, Nova Scotia, from 1944 to 1945.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | November 11, 1999
In Baltimore CountyMan changing flat on I-795 struck by dump truck, diesOWINGS MILLS -- A Reisterstown man was killed yesterday when he was struck by a dump truck while changing a flat tire on northbound Interstate 795, a state police spokesman said.Matthew Douglas Shenton, 38, of the first block of Candor Court died at the scene of the 1: 30 p.m. accident on the I-795 shoulder near the McDonogh Road overpass, said Pete Peringer, the spokesman. Shenton was changing a tire on his 1994 Ford F-250 pickup truck when he lost his balance, fell backward into traffic and was struck by the truck.
NEWS
February 28, 2008
Why keep attacking way to help addicts? I've been trying to understand why The Sun continues to beat up on buprenorphine, a medication that is showing some real promise in treating drug addiction ("Strategies to control bupe abuse outlined," Feb. 23). Where is the other side of the story? What about the citizens of Baltimore who are being helped through the treatment model developed by the city Health Department's buprenorphine initiative? Why not tell us more about those who are in the process of recovering from their heroin addiction through participation in this program, which not only administers the medication but requires attendance at counseling sessions to help deal with the psychological and social damage caused by years of drug addiction?
EXPLORE
October 17, 2012
Oldfields School is offering a free concert series to the public. Bethany Yarrow and Rufus perform on Oct. 17 at 7 p.m. Rufus plays cello and Bethany sings in the style of her father, Peter Yarrow, of Peter, Paul and Mary. The second concert is Nov. 9 at 7 p.m. and features the Szyrner Brothers. Lukasz Szyrner plays cello and Maciej Szyrner plays piano. Their classical music will feature composers such as Debussy and Chopin. The final concert is Dec. 7 at 7 p.m. and features The Second Generation Bluegrass Band from Freeland.
NEWS
September 13, 2012
For once I agree with Marta Mossburg, that something needs to be done about Baltimore City public schools ("Baltimore City schoolchildren deserve a real choice," Sept. 12). But I'm very curious where she came up with the numbers she uses to push her idea for vouchers. Unless she's living in a very different world from Baltimore, her numbers just don't add up. She says that Baltimore City spends $14,711 per student, which she says is the third highest in the nation. That may be true, but then she follows it up by saying, "Private school costs are lower than public school costs" and that a voucher system would cost only $42,00 per pupil over a three year period.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2012
Dr. Gloria Lea Bledsoe, a retired Baltimore County guidance counselor who established an Oldfields School early-childhood education program, died of cancer May 30 at Glen Meadows Assisted Living. She was 85 and lived in Towson for many years. Born Gloria Lea Whittle in Baltimore and raised on LaPaix Lane, she was a 1945 graduate of Notre Dame Preparatory School. After raising her family, she began teaching at Oldfields School in 1979. She established a nursery school along with an early-childhood education program, family members said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2012
It's a story that simply won't go away. It's an upper-class soap opera, and even after the passage of 75 years it still packs a sentimental punch and draws a willing audience into the glittering world of the British aristocracy. It is the saga of England's Edward VIII (he reigned for less than a year and was never crowned), who found it simply impossible to continue with his royal responsibilities without the love of an ambitious commoner from Baltimore, Wallis Warfield Simpson, the Belle of Biddle Street, who was determined to bag a royal and crash her way into the upper strata of British society.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2011
Martin Appell Dyer, a lawyer and neighborhood activist who was the first African-American to enroll at St. John's College in Annapolis, died Thursday of cancer at his Windsor Hills home. He was 80. The son of Martin A. Dyer, a steelworker, and Margaret Louise Dyer, a secretary to Lillie Mae Jackson when she was president of the Baltimore chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, he was born and raised in East Baltimore. After graduating from Paul Laurence Dunbar High School in 1948, he entered St. John's College.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 13, 2011
Dr. James Patrick Connaughton, a psychiatrist who was the founder and first director of what became the Johns Hopkins Children and Adolescent Mental Health Center, died Sunday of pancreatic cancer at his Cloisters home in the Woodbrook neighborhood of Baltimore County. He was 80. The son of a government worker and a shopkeeper, Dr. Connaughton was born and raised in Dublin, Ireland. After graduating from Rockwell College, a Tipperary boarding school, he entered University College in Dublin, where he earned his medical degree in 1956.
NEWS
September 13, 2012
For once I agree with Marta Mossburg, that something needs to be done about Baltimore City public schools ("Baltimore City schoolchildren deserve a real choice," Sept. 12). But I'm very curious where she came up with the numbers she uses to push her idea for vouchers. Unless she's living in a very different world from Baltimore, her numbers just don't add up. She says that Baltimore City spends $14,711 per student, which she says is the third highest in the nation. That may be true, but then she follows it up by saying, "Private school costs are lower than public school costs" and that a voucher system would cost only $42,00 per pupil over a three year period.
NEWS
February 28, 2008
Why keep attacking way to help addicts? I've been trying to understand why The Sun continues to beat up on buprenorphine, a medication that is showing some real promise in treating drug addiction ("Strategies to control bupe abuse outlined," Feb. 23). Where is the other side of the story? What about the citizens of Baltimore who are being helped through the treatment model developed by the city Health Department's buprenorphine initiative? Why not tell us more about those who are in the process of recovering from their heroin addiction through participation in this program, which not only administers the medication but requires attendance at counseling sessions to help deal with the psychological and social damage caused by years of drug addiction?
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