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By Frank D. Roylance and William B. Talbott and Frank D. Roylance and William B. Talbott,Evening Sun Staff | July 9, 1991
An Overlea woman and her two daughters were abducted, robbed and held for almost eight hours overnight, and one of the women was raped in the course of the apparently pre-planned robbery of a Baltimore County bank branch, police said.County police spokesman Sgt. Stephen R. Doarnberger said the older woman, an employee of the Sequoia Federal Savings Bank office at 8030 Belair Road, was forced by one of the two abductors to open the bank office early this morning. An undisclosed amount of money was taken before the three women were released.
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NEWS
By Susan Reimer | May 11, 2003
CBS COMMENTATOR and newspaper columnist Andy Rooney makes what I am sure is a pretty good living as an irascible old curmudgeon, but his trademark crankiness gets him into trouble, too. In 1990, he was suspended by CBS News for 32 days for inflammatory comments he made about gays to a gay newspaper that, in turn, ended up on a CBS news special. In 1992, he found himself in hot water for saying that American Indians should lighten up on the topic of sports nicknames such as "Redskins." In 1997, he angered that group once more by declaring that "so-called Indian casinos are a joke," and denouncing their owners as "sleazeballs."
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1999
POTOMAC -- OK, let's cut to the chase: Yes, Lynda Carter spent a lot of years living down Wonder Woman. But that's all in the past; right now, she's pretty happy with herself, her career and her legacy, and that includes a three-year stint as television's most bodacious post-feminist superhero."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1999
POTOMAC -- OK, let's cut to the chase: Yes, Lynda Carter spent a lot of years living down Wonder Woman. But that's all in the past; right now, she's pretty happy with herself, her career and her legacy, and that includes a three-year stint as television's most bodacious post-feminist superhero."
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | March 30, 1991
MOVIESA bridge through time Joanne Woodward was nominated for an Academy Award for her work in ''Mr. and Mrs. Bridge,'' and the honor was well deserved. Ms. Woodward stars with her husband, Paul Newman, as a Kansas City couple who make it through the Depression era '30s into the '40s. Many of us like to think that life was simpler back then, and maybe it was. But that doesn't mean Mr. and Mrs. Bridge were spared the familiar agonies. The film, sensitive and moving, is showing at the Rotunda and Westview cinemas.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff William Talbott and Glenn Small contributed to this article | July 9, 1991
An Overlea bank employee and her two daughters were abducted, robbed and held for almost eight hours overnight by two men who finally fled after forcing the woman to help them open and rob a Baltimore County bank branch early today, police said.One of the woman's daughters was raped in the course of the crimes, police said.County police spokesman Sgt. Stephen R. Doarnberger said police believe the suspects victimized the older woman, an employee of the Sequoia Federal Savings Bank office at 8030 Belair Road, because of her access to the bank.
NEWS
December 6, 1991
A physician employed at a medical clinic in the North Point area of Baltimore County remained in custody today at the detention center in Towson in lieu of $500,000 bond following charges he raped two women at gunpoint and tried to kill another.Arrested last week following a police chase in Perry Hall was Dr. Leonard Charles Harris, 37, of the 2500 block of Arland Road in White Marsh.Harris, according to police, worked as an internist at the Central Medical Center in North Point.Harris was charged with breaking into a second-floor apartment of a 27-year-old woman in White Marsh last Friday while she was away briefly.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1997
Howard County police are looking for a couple they believe attempted to run a scam on an elderly woman in The Mall at Columbia last week.Police said a 68-year-old woman from Ellicott City was to be intended victim of a scheme -- known as a "pigeon drop" -- which is often targeted at older females.The scheme unfolded when the woman was approached in The Mall between noon and 2: 30 p.m. Wednesday by a woman who claimed to have found an envelope containing a large amount of cash.According to a police report, one of the suspects told the woman she was going to check with her boss in order to determine if the money was real.
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | November 12, 1991
A 40-YEAR-old friend who is afraid of aging recently asked me if I've felt any discrimination now that I am over 65.An interesting question and one that I'm asked frequently.I told her if I'd felt anything, it's that sometimes I felt ignored or patronized.When waiting in line at a checkout counter, ticket line or trying to get a taxi, I can feel somewhat invisible because I am no longer pretty, sexy or young-looking.After all, one can't shed the blemishes and wrinkles of time. Like an aging house, the exterior changes shape and color, needs touching up, refurbishing -- the furrows of time are not kind.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 13, 1998
BOSTON -- Could we pause for a moment to pay attention to the other woman? The other other woman? The older other woman?While a runaway Congress is heedlessly lurching its way toward impeachment, there is another freight train rolling through Washington: Social Security reform.Last week's White House conference on the future of the retirement fund was nearly lost in the Monica mess. But it is now clear that the debate about Social Security has shifted in the direction of Wall Street. The argument is less about the social or the security and more about privatizing all or some of the national retirement program.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 13, 1998
BOSTON -- Could we pause for a moment to pay attention to the other woman? The other other woman? The older other woman?While a runaway Congress is heedlessly lurching its way toward impeachment, there is another freight train rolling through Washington: Social Security reform.Last week's White House conference on the future of the retirement fund was nearly lost in the Monica mess. But it is now clear that the debate about Social Security has shifted in the direction of Wall Street. The argument is less about the social or the security and more about privatizing all or some of the national retirement program.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1997
Howard County police are looking for a couple they believe attempted to run a scam on an elderly woman in The Mall at Columbia last week.Police said a 68-year-old woman from Ellicott City was to be intended victim of a scheme -- known as a "pigeon drop" -- which is often targeted at older females.The scheme unfolded when the woman was approached in The Mall between noon and 2: 30 p.m. Wednesday by a woman who claimed to have found an envelope containing a large amount of cash.According to a police report, one of the suspects told the woman she was going to check with her boss in order to determine if the money was real.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | November 3, 1994
Louisa Reynolds stood on an unheated stage in an empty theater and read lines to a young aspiring actress."It was as cold as a welldigger's grave that day," says Mrs. Reynolds, an 80-something lady. We were in the parlor of her Roland Park Place apartment.The year was 1929 and standing opposite her on the chilly stage was a performer who possessed more promise than fame. Her name was Mildred Natwick, who after a long career on Broadway and in Hollywood, died last week.In her prime, there was rarely a Broadway season when Mildred Natwick's name wasn't listed in a theater program.
FEATURES
By SUSAN DIEZ and SUSAN DIEZ,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 28, 1993
Q: I recently got engaged to a wonderful woman. She is virgin and I am not. She is afraid of losing her virginity, even to me. I am sure she loves me enough, but I believe that her family never spoke much to her about sex. The question is: What can I do to allay her fears and allow her to experience sex?A: Since losing virginity is a rite of passage too significant for you alone to handle, gather some expert help. Talk to a couples counselor together. Get a copy of the book "The Joy of Sex" by Dr. Alex Comfort and read it -- slowly -- together.
NEWS
By Mary Schmich | November 18, 1992
WE can't have meant to do this to our mothers.I know a 69-year-old woman who didn't leave her parents' home until the age of 30, when she married and moved in with her husband. For the next 32 years, she raised their children while he negotiated with the outside world, made the family rules and ruled the family money.After a life of hard work and good intentions, the man died. He left $134 in the bank. The woman found herself destitute and, for the first time in her life, alone.Now this woman lives on Social Security and the charity of her children.
NEWS
December 6, 1991
A physician employed at a medical clinic in the North Point area of Baltimore County remained in custody today at the detention center in Towson in lieu of $500,000 bond following charges he raped two women at gunpoint and tried to kill another.Arrested last week following a police chase in Perry Hall was Dr. Leonard Charles Harris, 37, of the 2500 block of Arland Road in White Marsh.Harris, according to police, worked as an internist at the Central Medical Center in North Point.Harris was charged with breaking into a second-floor apartment of a 27-year-old woman in White Marsh last Friday while she was away briefly.
FEATURES
By Jean Dietz and Jean Dietz,Boston Globe | October 16, 1991
BOSTON -- Women, now living longer lives than ever, must learn to plan ahead to make those extra years as vital and healthy as possible. That is the message Jane Porcino, author and activist, hopes to bring to women of all ages."
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | November 3, 1994
Louisa Reynolds stood on an unheated stage in an empty theater and read lines to a young aspiring actress."It was as cold as a welldigger's grave that day," says Mrs. Reynolds, an 80-something lady. We were in the parlor of her Roland Park Place apartment.The year was 1929 and standing opposite her on the chilly stage was a performer who possessed more promise than fame. Her name was Mildred Natwick, who after a long career on Broadway and in Hollywood, died last week.In her prime, there was rarely a Broadway season when Mildred Natwick's name wasn't listed in a theater program.
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | November 12, 1991
A 40-YEAR-old friend who is afraid of aging recently asked me if I've felt any discrimination now that I am over 65.An interesting question and one that I'm asked frequently.I told her if I'd felt anything, it's that sometimes I felt ignored or patronized.When waiting in line at a checkout counter, ticket line or trying to get a taxi, I can feel somewhat invisible because I am no longer pretty, sexy or young-looking.After all, one can't shed the blemishes and wrinkles of time. Like an aging house, the exterior changes shape and color, needs touching up, refurbishing -- the furrows of time are not kind.
FEATURES
By Jean Dietz and Jean Dietz,Boston Globe | October 16, 1991
BOSTON -- Women, now living longer lives than ever, must learn to plan ahead to make those extra years as vital and healthy as possible. That is the message Jane Porcino, author and activist, hopes to bring to women of all ages."
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