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By June Kurtz and June Kurtz,Contributing writer | February 12, 1992
A story in Wednesday's edition, headlined "Older students find there's still a lot to learn in class," should have said the class fee forsenior citizens at Carroll Community College is $20 per course.It's never too late to learn.At least that's what three Carroll women who have gone back to college believe."I took a year leave without pay before I retired, to decide what I was going to do when I grew up," said Joan F. Taylor, 57, a religious studies major who's on the dean's list at Western Maryland College in Westminster.
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NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2014
Oakland Mills High School senior John Dean didn't join the school's choir until his junior year — a decision he now describes as a mistake he hopes younger students interested in singing don't make. This week, he and fellow choir members will have a chance to influence younger singers, as Oakland Mills takes the lead role in the Oakland Mills Community Choral Festival, scheduled for Wednesday. For the second year, the school is organizing the festival, which enables its choir to perform with groups from neighboring elementary and middle schools, combining hundreds of voices from students in grades five through 12. Students from Atholton, Jeffers Hill, Talbott Springs and Thunder Hill elementary schools, Lake Elkhorn and Oakland Mills middle schools and Oakland Mills High School will perform together in concert Wednesday evening at Bridgeway Community Church in Columbia.
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FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | September 2, 1993
Cathy Ettenhofer entered the work force as a hairdresser in 1967, left it to raise two sons and now stands one semester shy of a degree in social work from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. The 45-year-old student plans to become a geriatric social worker, probably in a nursing home.She says her desire to help finance college for her sons and to find a spiritually rewarding career brought her to college in 1988 -- and will send her on to graduate school.This fall, college campuses across the nation will welcome millions of older, "non-traditional" students who are eager for career changes as well as for the extra money that a college -- or advanced -- degree can provide.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
Coppin State University should enroll higher-caliber freshmen, focus more on transfer and returning students, and reorganize its academics and administration, a committee plans to report Wednesday to the University System of Maryland Board of Regents. The recommendations, from a panel convened in December to study Coppin State, are meant to turn around the stressed institution, one of Maryland's four historically black colleges and universities. The school has one of the lowest six-year graduation rates for first-time, full-time students in the country at 15 percent as of fiscal year 2012 and is underenrolled by more than 2,000 students, the committee said.
NEWS
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Evening Sun Staff | October 25, 1991
While a state survey of adolescents shows a decrease in overall drug use among older students, officials are concerned about results that show an increase in experimentation among sixth- and eighth-graders.Although some question the accuracy of the Maryland Adolescent Survey Report, citing its length and format as too demanding of younger students, others say the results are an accurate depiction of drug use in Maryland schools.The survey, which cost $80,000,was given to 14,000 Maryland students chosen to represent a statistically valid sample of the population.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | July 24, 1991
Lucille Turner, a 49-year-old mother of two grown children, had cometo "that point in life when you want something more."So, the Finksburg resident enrolled in a program at the Carroll County Career and Technology Center to become a licensed practical nurse.She is one of eight post-secondary students in the yearlong program, which began a six-week session earlier this summer."I had no children at home and I could afford to go, so I decided to do it," said Turner, a nurse's aide. "It's something I've always wanted to do."
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2008
As kids head back to school tomorrow, freshmen at Aberdeen High School may find the first day a little less daunting. During the summer, more than 100 incoming ninth graders got a look at the school, the upperclassmen and their peers, when they participated in the school's first freshman field day. With more than 400 new freshmen expected to attend the school this year, the event was part of a multipronged approach to improve freshman transition, said...
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1998
Heather Housand is 13 years old and has just discovered ho scary high school can be.Older students necking in the hallways. Piles of homework. Rules. The sheer size of the place.Glen Burnie Senior High is crammed with 2,074 students who, along with 115 teachers, rush to classes through a maze of hallways in six buildings."I was worried about getting lost," said Heather, whose small, single-building middle school had about half as many students. "I was really nervous when the older kids came."
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2003
Students entering middle and high school in Anne Arundel County this fall won't have an extra day to orient themselves before older students join them, as has been the practice in past years, officials said. Superintendent Eric J. Smith noted instructional and financial reasons for eliminating the staggered openings, which allowed incoming sixth- and ninth-graders to start school a day early. "I think it's very important that both parents and students are at ease," Smith said. "But there are ways to deal with it that are more cost effective and less disruptive to one of our precious school days."
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2003
Students entering middle and high school in Anne Arundel County this fall won't have an extra day to orient themselves before older students join them, as has been the practice in past years, officials said. Superintendent Eric J. Smith noted instructional and financial reasons for eliminating the staggered openings, which allowed incoming sixth- and ninth-graders to start school a day early. "I think it's very important that both parents and students are at ease," Smith said. "But there are ways to deal with it that are more cost effective and less disruptive to one of our precious school days."
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 18, 2013
Roland Park Country School graduate Jocelyn Young-Hyman, who is now a Peace Corps volunteer, has big plans for the money raised Thursday by her alma mater in its annual All-School Walk. Young-Hyman, a 2007graduate of the all-girls school on Roland Avenue, is assigned to work at Kichakamkwaju School For The Deaf, in Kenya. On April 1, she emailed Roland Park Country School Upper School Head Ereni Malfa, asking for help in raising money for art supplies and academic games. "My school is an extremely poor school with absolutely no resources or parents who can support their children," she wrote.
EXPLORE
December 15, 2011
Listings are accepted on a space-available basis. Deadline is 5 p.m. Thursday prior to date of publication at the latest. To submit volunteer items, mail to Volunteers, Patuxent Publishing Co. Editorial, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278; email hccalendar@patuxent.com ; fax 410-332-6336; or call 410-332-6497. Howard County Library Board of Trustees - Seeking applicants for two board positions: one representing County Council District 5 (Western Howard County)
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
Anne Arundel Community College officials say that for some prospective students, particularly adults who have spent years away from a formal classroom setting, the stresses of school begin well before enrollment. The school will hold an open house next month called "College 101" to help ease anxieties for adults looking to begin long-delayed goals to attend college or those who are returning to the classroom. The program will be offered at the school's Arundel Mills campus in Hanover on Aug. 3 and at its main campus in Arnold on Aug. 6. "The program was initiated because many adults have been away from school for many years," said Frances Turcott, director of AACC's Off-Site and Weekend College.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2011
After meeting for nearly two hours Friday with parents from Stoneleigh Elementary School, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz agreed to fund $2 million in architectural designs for upgrades to the 81-year-old school building. Securing the design money is a major goal for the parents, many of whom were concerned by Kamenetz's recent comments that school officials should consider moving students from overcrowded elementary schools to under-enrolled middle schools as an alternative to new construction.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2010
On last Monday's first day of school, scores of sixth-graders at Corkran Middle in Glen Burnie walked the hallways wide-eyed, as if they were stuck in a maze. They were the newcomers, fresh from elementary school, some switching classes for the first time. The Anne Arundel County system allows sixth-graders to get acclimated one day before seventh- and eighth-graders return, but for many of the youngsters, that didn't seem to help much. It's a good thing students like Ciara Bahadur were around.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2008
As kids head back to school tomorrow, freshmen at Aberdeen High School may find the first day a little less daunting. During the summer, more than 100 incoming ninth graders got a look at the school, the upperclassmen and their peers, when they participated in the school's first freshman field day. With more than 400 new freshmen expected to attend the school this year, the event was part of a multipronged approach to improve freshman transition, said...
NEWS
June 9, 2006
As a teenager, Mary Sanford Williams yearned to become a lawyer. But at the time, there was no money for college. Finally, now that she has graduated from Baltimore City Community College - at age 80 - the West Baltimore resident is closer to her goal. BCCC's oldest graduate this year plans to become a legal assistant. According to The Sun's Sumathi Reddy, Ms. Williams, who had a 3.5 grade-point average, did not attend the graduation ceremony last week because she is in summer school and has started course work at the University of Baltimore on the way to getting her bachelor's degree.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | May 22, 1994
Reading and writing together is building bridges between students at Sykesville Middle and Piney Ridge Elementary schools.Once a month, the middle school students go to the neighboring school and read to kindergartners. The project, funded by a grant from the Nestle Co., gives children in the Reading is Fundamental program an opportunity for educational interactionwith older students.It also provides the best in children's literature to the youngsters. Hundreds of free books go home with the kindergartners.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | June 8, 2008
Benjamin Harris is like most 15-year-olds - He has his first summer job, and he is counting the days until he can get his learner's permit - but for one thing. Instead of starting his junior year in high school this fall, he will be a junior at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. The Severn teenager graduated summa cum laude May 29 with an associate's degree from Anne Arundel Community College and won a $5,000 scholarship to UMBC. No matter that he is too young, according to the state of Maryland, to take the General Educational Development (GED)
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | December 11, 2007
Most grants and scholarships are for students trying to attain that first college degree. But what's available for nontraditional students, those who are older and pursuing a graduate degree? We're talking about students like Daniela Bostic-Clark, 44, who a week ago was accepted into a graduate program at Georgetown University. The one-year master's in leadership program will cost $43,600. "At this stage of my life, I can't afford to be saddled with loans," says Bostic-Clark, an Accokeek, Prince George's County, resident in who works for a nonprofit in Virginia.
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