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NEWS
February 3, 1994
There is a truism about the rapid development of any community: New neighborhoods get a lot of attention, in the form of new roads and schools. And, as a consequence, those who live in older communities often feel neglected.Del. Virginia M. Thomas, D-13A, is proposing a way to deal more equitably with old and new neighborhoods by directing certain tax revenues to older schools in need of renovations and new equipment. Her intentions are commendable.Specifically, Delegate Thomas wants the state legislature to allow the county to direct funds from a proposed tax on parking to older schools.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley said Monday that his administration proposes spending $336 million on school construction aid next year, including $25 million to add air conditioning to older schools. At a news conference at Overlea High School —- more than 50 years old and without air conditioning — O'Malley said the construction spending would yield an estimated 8,199 jobs. The money set aside for air conditioning addresses an issue of particular concern in Baltimore County, which has about 65 of the 180 schools in the state that lack cooling systems.
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NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | June 15, 1993
Del. Virginia M. Thomas says too many East Columbia schools are "discriminated against" and she's organizing a coalition to make sure the district's older schools get a larger share of the county schools' budget.Ms. Thomas met with PTA and administrative representatives from Oakland Mills village's five schools last week to discuss inadequacies and offer advice on seeking county and state money for improvements."You look at the older schools, and there's no money for anything. That's the bottom line," said Ms. Thomas.
NEWS
September 18, 2012
Tuesday's Baltimore County Board of Education meeting, along with all other afternoon and evening BCPS activities, has been postponed due to inclement weather. But when the board does meet on Wednesday, Sept. 19, their focus will be on keeping schools cool. On the board's agenda is a status report on the air conditioning in county public schools. The report, which is previewed on the school board's website - - looks at the county's plan for installing air conditioning in new and older schools, and includes information on budgets and scheduling.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Sun Staff Writer | May 18, 1994
The Howard County Council yesterday asked County Executive Charles I. Ecker to let the county borrow $4.7 million in the coming fiscal year to put older schools on a technological par with newer ones.The request is part of a complicated plan to restore $2.1 million to the school board's operating budget for fiscal 1995, which starts July 1.But if Mr. Ecker turns down the council's request, the three Democrats on the five-member council seem ready to move forward with an alternative plan to cut key programs in the noneducation portion of Mr. Ecker's budget -- including police overtime and snow removal.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | July 22, 1993
Charles Scudder's walks through Talbott Springs Elementary School remind him of his school days 35 years back.The gym, the desks, the intercom system, the library card catalog files -- they all look the same, which is distressing to this father of two."The brand new schools are getting everything -- absolutely hTC everything," he said. "They have to start putting money into these older schools."He and other parents are asking the Board of Education to channel some school construction money toward renovation of Howard County's older schools, most of which are in Columbia.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | July 19, 1992
After years of neglect, the county's older schools appear likely to finally get the sprucing up they so desperately need.About $10.5 million would go toward school repairs and renovations under the estimated $19 million 1993-1994 capital budget passed by the school board Monday night.The budget, which now goes to the County Council, includes more money than ever before for repairs and renovations, said board member George Lisby."We must manage and take care of our older buildings because the longer they are not serviced, the greater the cost will be to take care of them in the end," said Mr. Lisby, who finished his one-year term as board president Monday.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1999
Some parents who attended Monday night's County Council meeting about problems in Howard County's older schools say they are being left out of the discussion, despite their desire to be a part of the solutions."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 6, 2000
In fast-growing Howard County -- where schools are opened two or three at a time to accommodate students from newly built sub-divisions -- the school system is grappling with how to deal with complaints that older, more established schools are being left behind when it comes to technology and resources. The Sun asked 17 candidates campaigning for two open school board seats to give their opinions on the issue of older schools, in advance of tomorrow's primary. The four candidates with the most votes will advance to the general election in November -- but residents can vote for only two candidates.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | October 7, 1993
An informal group of parents from across the county is urging the Howard County school board to develop a comprehensive plan to renovate older schools.About a dozen parents, representing several older schools, plan to make their plea at tonight's 7:30 p.m. board meeting, as members hear testimony on the $40 million capital budget proposal for next year and the $300 million capital budget proposal for the next 10 years.Parents representing the older schools are among the more than 60 people who have signed up to testify at tonight's budget hearing.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | January 15, 2009
The Baltimore County school board was encouraged to maintain the pay raises in the proposed operating budget for the 2010 fiscal year during a public hearing last night. About 50 people attended the hearing, which took place at Ridge Ruxton School in Towson. Among the 20 or so who addressed the board, a theme emerged: Even in tough economic times, employees deserve - and need - a salary increase, which would also help keep teachers in the county instead of seeking higher pay elsewhere.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | January 6, 2008
Teacher salaries and benefits resulting from union negotiations contributed to the bulk of the $43.8 million increase to Howard County Superintendent Sydney L. Cousin's proposed 2009 operating budget. The $656.7 million budget would allow the school system to hire 151 new employees and to perform upkeep maintenance on older buildings. "This budget is a realistic and responsible one," Cousin said Thursday before he unveiled the plan to the public. Under Cousin's budget, teacher salaries would increase by about 5 percent.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | September 24, 2006
At a time when the proceeds from a two-year old excise tax on new homes are running out, two candidates for Howard County executive said last week that a new funding source is needed to help pay for school construction and renovations. Republican Christopher J. Merdon said he favors a new impact fee on development. Independent C. Stephen Wallis said he would work with the General Assembly delegation to work out sustainable funding for schools and other infrastructure, if elected in November.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | April 30, 2006
In pinpointing $18.2 million in cuts in the school system's operating and capital budgets for the coming school year, Superintendent Sydney L. Cousin managed to protect classroom instruction, but he proposed delaying school renovation projects and forgoing new guidance counselors and other student-services staff members. The cuts are deep enough that school board members have urged parents and staff members to turn out in full force at Saturday's public hearing on the budget and to pressure the County Council to restore the cuts.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2004
Students from more than 20 city schools were sent home early this week because unseasonably high temperatures made it uncomfortable -- or in some cases, unsafe -- for them to stay in class. School system officials said yesterday that they think the worst of the school closings are behind them because students are off today for teacher training and weather forecasts show lower temperatures next week. But this week was particularly trying for the school system because of the heat. On Tuesday, officials closed all city schools about lunchtime, after temperatures reached 92 degrees by 11 a.m. The system's policy is to send students home if temperatures reach 90 by 11 a.m. Over the past two days, at least a handful of city schools have shut early, and some did not open, because of high temperatures.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2004
The Maryland Senate voted this week to reduce Baltimore County's share of school reconstruction money by nearly $1.5 million despite protests from county senators. The county lost more than seven times as much as any other jurisdiction from what state officials said was a reassessment of the needs of Maryland's aging schools. The money comes from a $10.3 million pool, and other school systems' gains were Baltimore County's loss. The change for Baltimore County was so great because the way it has renovated its schools in recent years made it difficult for the state to estimate their age. "We got penalized because we put more money into aging schools than other counties," said state Sen. Norman R. Stone Jr., who tried to amend the bill.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | October 8, 1993
At the county school board hearing last night on budget issues, much of the discussion centered on equity.Almost half of the 60 parents who testified urged the five-member board to remember aging schools when they vote on next year's proposed $40 million capital budget at the board's Oct. 14 meeting. Only $5 million of that money is proposed for renovating older schools."We know we should build new schools," said Terry Westerlund, a parent at Clarksville Elementary School. "But we also know an antique [if neglected]
NEWS
By Erika D. Peterman and Erika D. Peterman,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1999
Though no specific solutions were reached, a task force studying ways to help Columbia's older schools touched on issues ranging from redistricting to PTA fund-raising to housing, during a meeting last night.Retired educators, residents and members of the Columbia Council discussed how the community can help ensure equity among Howard County schools, and how a proposed donation of $100,000 from the council might best benefit some Columbia schools.At a recent budget work session, Columbia Council members agreed to include the donation in the Columbia Association's proposed budget for the 2001 fiscal year, an unprecedented move by the CA's governing body.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2002
Over the years, Howard County's oldest high school has had numerous additions, renovations and upgrades - a roofing or air-control project here, a new science hall or student services center there. But when a committee sat down to plan how the school system could best increase capacity at Howard High School by about 150 to 1,332 - the standard for other Howard County high schools - members discovered much more in and around the 51-year-old building that wasn't up to county standards. When the final list of enhancements reached the school board two weeks ago, the $4 million addition had snowballed into a $12 million building-and-program overhaul for the school on Route 108. That chasm reintroduces the question of equity between old and new schools.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2001
Howard County will get $5 million more from the state in school construction aid next year than the $20 million expected - a 25 percent bonus that left county officials overjoyed. "Jeez!" exclaimed Associate Superintendent Sydney L. Cousin, who oversees school construction projects. "This will help a great deal." Superintendent John O' Rourke said the money can be applied to school renovation projects. "It's a great help." Howard's grant, announced yesterday in Annapolis, is by far the largest amount the county has received in school construction money from the state in at least 15 years, Cousin said - larger than the $20.7 million received this year and the $16 million two years ago. The governor's announcement yesterday involved division of the final $99 million of the total $295 to be distributed statewide for fiscal year 2002.
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