Advertisement
HomeCollectionsOlder People
IN THE NEWS

Older People

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer/United Feature Syndicate | January 5, 1993
Most older people will find this hard to believe, but when they injure their muscles during exercise, they heal just as quickly as younger people do.Your muscles usually feel sore on the day after you exercise vigorously. The soreness is caused by direct damage to your muscle fibers. Most people heal from this damage within 48 hours. Competitive athletes know this and usually train hard on one day and then do not exercise intensely again until after the soreness disappears at least 48 hours later.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 24, 2014
There is lots of science that tells us that experiences make us happier than possessions. But which experiences make us the happiest? Which experiences should we seek out if we want to be happy? A study titled "Happiness from Ordinary and Extraordinary Experiences" by two marketing professors set out first to separate experiences into those two broad categories: extraordinary (uncommon and infrequent), such as the birth of a child or a trip to Hawaii; and ordinary (common and frequent)
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Universal Press Syndicate | January 6, 1991
Elderhostel, a non-profit network with a lip-smacking smorgasbord of live-in academic programs for travelers 60 and older, served up 265,000 courses last year. And its average participant came back for a fourth helping.Since its founding in 1975, Elderhostel's enrollments have increased 15 percent to 25 percent a year, from 220 to last year's 265,000. Now other organizations and tour operators are taking note of this seemingly insatiable hunger of mature Americans for deepening their learning as they travel.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | January 10, 2013
It inevitably happens to people every flu season - they obediently get a flu shot only to catch the virus anyway. But don't blame the flu shot. Despite what many people believe, the flu shot doesn't cause the flu. The influenza viruses in the shot are dead and can't cause infection, according to the Centers for Disease Control. So why do people still get sick even after getting the shot? One explanation is they could have a different strain of the virus than the one the vaccine will fend off. Drug makers create each season's vaccine based on which strain they think will be prominent.
NEWS
By New York Times | November 26, 1990
Hidden for years by secrecy, shame and in some cases the assumption that their symptoms were simply those of aging, a growing number of older people are emerging as victims of AIDS.AIDS now occurs far more frequently in people over the age of 50 -- classified as older by those who treat and study AIDS -- than among children under the age of 13.According to the most recent data from the Federal Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, there have been 15,696 cases reported in people over 50 as against 2,686 in children under 13. Older people account for 10 percent of the more than 150,000 AIDS cases reported to the government.
FEATURES
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,The Boston Globe | April 18, 1995
'TC She is a 92-year-old woman -- anybody's mother, anybody's patient.Because of bad circulation, she developed a foot ulcer, for which surgeons offered two choices: Amputating the foot in a fairly simple surgical procedure, or a more complicated bypass operation to save her foot by grafting other blood vessels onto the decayed area.Her chances of walking were limited either way because of her severe arthritis. But her family wanted to save her foot. So she chose the bypass, and at first things went well.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 30, 1992
Elderly Americans are more satisfied with life than the elderly in other developed countries. They also seem more active, more independent, generally healthy and happy with the quality of their medical care.Those findings are part of a unique five-nation survey, released yesterday, in which older people were questioned about their attitudes toward everything from health to loneliness.Older Americans reported being "very satisfied with life" twice as often as the elderly in Japan and 50 percent more often than the elderly in western Germany.
NEWS
By Valerie Takahama and Valerie Takahama,Knight Ridder / Tribune | October 8, 2000
She isn't an advice columnist a la Dear Abby or Ann Landers, but mature adults could do worse than consider, "What would Jane do" when they confront knotty dilemmas both big and small. Jane -- that's Jane Glenn Haas who writes the "Our Time" column and articles on aging in the Orange County Register. She covers a range of subjects from retirement and elder abuse to sex after 60 and old friendships that don't last. Notably, she has shared her own experiences with breast cancer, cosmetic surgery and reuniting with a son she'd been estranged from for years.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2002
Vision problems short of blindness are one of the most daunting disabilities facing seniors. Despite advances in laser eye surgery and other technologies to perfect the vision of the young, there are few answers for conditions that affect older people. Because of these difficulties, the operators of a new nonprofit vision center in Savage hope to make their center an important stop for many older Howard County residents with uncorrectable visual impairments. It is one of the few places between Baltimore and Washington to offer help with tools to cope with such disabilities, which experts say will affect hundreds of thousands of seniors in coming years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Madigan and Tim Madigan,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 4, 2002
On a frigid February morning, Willard Lloyd circles the pool table, contemplating both his next shot and his ingrained status as an Internet holdout. "I don't know a damn thing about it, and I don't need it," Lloyd grumbles while chalking his cue at the Grapevine (Texas) Senior Activities Center. "I'm 81 years old. What do I need the Internet for? I've got a computer that Methuselah used, and I've learned to play some games on it, but when I've got to talk to someone, I can get on the phone and call my kids," Lloyd says.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2012
Carol Carr showed all the signs of colorectal cancer seven years ago, but doctors thought the 44-year-old Glen Burnie woman was too young to have the disease and never tested her for it. Instead, they said her diarrhea, vomiting, cramping, iron deficiency and extreme fatigue were more likely caused by the flu, anxiety and even a brain disorder. Treatments for those illnesses failed and Carr got so sick she had to stop working. When she finally saw a specialist who ordered a colonoscopy she was suffering from Stage II colorectal cancer.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
An Anne Arundel County judge sent a man to prison Wednesday for a series of paving scams in the county, calling Tommy Clack a "shameless swindler" who preyed on unsuspecting consumers. Clack, 40, was sentenced to two years in prison and five years probation for contracting and home improvement violations in the county, after he pleaded guilty this year in eight cases. Prosecutors said Clack targeted mostly older homeowners, often offering to repave driveways at a bargain price with leftover materials and demanding a heftier fee after the work was done.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | March 26, 2012
There were times around mid-day outside the polling place at the Westminster Senior Center on March 24 when the campaign volunteers — all three or four of them, standing in the misty rainy chill — easily outnumbered the voters. "It's light, maybe six or eight people an hour," said Krista Kniesler, a candidate for the Carroll County Board of Education, who stood under an umbrella handing out campaign literature in front of the senior center. "Maybe (the light turnout) is because of the rain, or maybe people don't know," about early voting, Kniesler added.
HEALTH
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 20, 2010
Elsa Lundgren beams as she stands in the archway between her bedroom and living room. She used to live in a single, hospital-like room on the assisted-living floor at Broadmead retirement community in Hunt Valley. But after a renovation, she now has a sitting room with a flat-screen TV, a small kitchen, a bathroom with a walk-in shower and, most important to her, several large windows that give her plenty of light. "My eyesight was getting poorer and poorer," says the 96-year-old, who has lived at Broadmead for 18 years.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | August 20, 2008
Have you heard the one about Sen. John McCain being old? Maybe this one, from The Tonight Show With Jay Leno: "John McCain says he has a list of about 20 names of potential vice presidential candidates. I don't want to say John McCain is old, but the list begins 'Hear ye! Hear ye!' " Ba da boom. Since he announced his candidacy for president, there has been no shortage of jokes about the age of McCain, who turns 72 this month. From late-night talk shows to blogs and Web sites, many observers find the Republican candidate's white hair, lumbering gait and grandfatherly disposition fodder for humorous discussion.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | June 30, 2008
In 1953, K. Dale Williams Sr. bought a new Plymouth for $1,975. That was a wince-worthy sum back then, but Williams remembers cringing even more when he was offered - for $13 more - a handy-dandy little gadget called a turn signal. "It was an option back then, turn signals," Williams, 77, said. "And back-up lights." Over the years, Williams has learned that turn signals are far from optional; they're vital. As are such good driving practices as checking mirrors and blind spots before moving an inch, merging smoothly and safely, and adhering to the three-second rule when following another car. As district coordinator of AARP's Safe Driving Program for motorists 50 and older, Williams has been teaching lessons like those to drivers in his peer group since 2001.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,Morning Call | February 4, 2007
Age discrimination is running rampant in America, and people older than 50 should take full advantage of it. Price discounts abound for the more mature crowd, but you have to know where to look. Joan Rattner Heilman knows. She has written the 2007-2008 edition of Unbelievably Good Deals and Great Adventures That You Absolutely Can't Get Unless You're Over 50. It's important information for the nearly one in four Americans older than 50. Their ranks are swelling every day, and businesses have noticed this group and its huge buying power.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 7, 2002
ORLANDO, Fla. - On the surface, older people might seem to show feelings less than the young, but their emotions might actually be more intense, according to a new study. Research that measured the responses of 30 young, middle-aged and older people to a series of slides with emotional content found that though the elders had less pronounced physical responses, such as changes in their heart rate, they reported more feelings than young people did. The findings could help doctors better assess older people's emotional state when prescribing antidepressants, said Donald Powell of the Veterans Administration Hospital in Columbia, S.C., who reported on the study at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | June 15, 2008
Print is having some issues at the moment, which may be like saying New Orleans took on some water. Insults fly, playground-style, about how long one published entity or another will be alive. Microsoft's CEO says no ink-on-paper newspapers or magazines by 2018; someone else says there'll be no Microsoft by then either. Newsweek will be gone in five years, predicts a columnist willing to bet dinner on it; I prefer steak, the magazine's editor shoots back. A study released last week by the Internet research firm Nielsen Online revealed a part of the problem: People in the computer age are probably reading more than they ever have, so it's difficult to convince them to do more of it. It's the same 24-hour day that's always existed, recalling Mark Twain's quote about the wisdom of investing in land because they're not making any more of it. People on average spend two hours a day, or more in many cases, reading online at work or home, according to the latest Nielsen study involving about 30,000 users.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | April 25, 2008
John Hopkins geriatrician Dr. Robert Burton has heard far too many stories like that of Nancy Schmidt, the 74-year-old woman who was attacked in her Remington home this week. "I think older people are particularly vulnerable to crime ..." Burton said, ticking off horror story after horror story of patients he has known who have been similarly victimized. "Particularly single women living alone are somehow preferentially targeted."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.