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Older Neighborhoods

NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2002
As open land disappears and real estate prices soar, communities built decades ago are becoming the next growth frontier in Howard County - to the dismay of some who live there. Landowners are subdividing generous yards and putting up two, four, even six or more new houses where one had stood. Ellicott City residents - complaining that this "infill" development is breeding sore-thumb buildings on odd-shaped lots that dump traffic onto roads meant for fewer vehicles - are demanding new laws to regulate small subdivisions.
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NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2003
Kembo Road, in the shadow of the city, leads to a chemical manufacturer, a steel fabricator, a trucking company and mounds of muck cleared from the Baltimore Harbor. A perfect place, neighbors decided, for some preserved land. Now 116 acres in that industrial swath is guaranteed to remain woods and wetlands, a green island in a gritty area between Baltimore and the dense neighborhoods of Glen Burnie and Pasadena. Land preservation, so often about saving amber fields of grain, is increasingly gaining popularity in urban and inner-suburban communities across the nation as grass-roots groups try to protect slices of nature - sometimes as small as a fraction of an acre - in places they feel could desperately use a break from pavement.
NEWS
June 12, 1996
REBUILDING ALLEYS ranks right up there with fixing sewer mains as one of the most un-glitzy chores local government has to perform, which may explain why the Baltimore County administrations that reigned during the cash-rich '80s didn't do it.They were more interested in investing in "growth areas." Two years ago, then-County Executive Roger B. Hayden began at long last to focus attention on the county's older communities, where basic infrastructure has been rotting away. Current Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger promptly picked up the ball.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | November 20, 1994
At the urging of community groups, Baltimore County is beginning a program to increase home ownership in certain aging neighborhoods.The county will use about $1.2 million in federal grant money to lend first-time homebuyers as much as $5,000 toward settlement costs in four older areas. These areas gradually have been depopulated by economic decline and a steady loss of senior citizens."This is a very much needed program," said Frank W. Welsh, director of the county Department of Community Development.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1998
Looking for a bargain on holiday wrapping paper, Desiree Bialek and her boyfriend, Tom Starks, made a beeline for the Rite Aid in Dundalk Village Shopping Center a couple blocks from her home."
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1996
Hoping to revitalize older communities by encouraging homeownership, Baltimore County has increased the number of neighborhoods in which first-time buyers can get help with settlement expenses.Low- and moderate-income buyers can get loans of up to $5,000 toward a down payment and closing costs through the county's Settlement Expense Loan Program (SELP), which has $2 million available through next June.The program, now in its second year, has been expanded to include nearly all established neighborhoods as part of a county initiative to conserve older areas.
BUSINESS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1997
Imagine you're 26, a newlywed with a few thousand dollars tucked away in a savings account. You're looking to buy a rowhouse in one of Baltimore's historic neighborhoods, but you can't afford to pay more than $2,500 up front.An impossible dream?Not for Thomas and Kelly Rudis.Obtaining some financial help from the seller and using two settlement-assistance programs, by the time they got to the settlement table all they needed was a mere 39 cents.Hundreds of couples like the Rudises have bought homes in Baltimore's aging neighborhoods during the past few years, drawn to the city by the promise of settlement- and closing-cost assistance -- the kind of help that is seldom offered in the counties.
NEWS
December 24, 2001
NEWS THAT Howard County is the nation's seventh-richest county means the American Dream is a reality for many households in the Baltimore suburb. The numbers are good for the families and good for budget officers in the county and state who salivate over the tax income revenue these households generate. Howard doesn't have gaping pockets of poverty, but disparities exist. It's becoming increasingly clear, for instance, that parents prefer some parts of the county to others because the quality of education varies by zip code.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 9, 2002
In an effort to revitalize older city neighborhoods, Westminster is asking for more than $500,000 in state Community Legacy funds - its largest request ever for such money, according to the city's housing and community development office. In its application, which is due today, the city is asking for money for four projects. It is seeking: $450,000 for the Union Street Community Center; $100,000 for pedestrian-level street lighting for Pennsylvania Avenue; $160,000 for low- or no-interest revolving loans for low-income families; and $10,000 for homeownership initiatives that will bring more residents to older Westminster neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | February 22, 1995
Harold G. Reid, former chairman of the Baltimore County Planning Board, was named yesterday to a $40,000-a-year post as Westside coordinator for the county's Community Conservation Program.Mr. Reid is the first black to be appointed by County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger III, who took office in December.Mr. Ruppersberger also named Lynn Barranger, a volunteer in his political campaign and a community activist, to fill a similar part-time role in the Lansdowne-Baltimore Highlands area of the southwestern part of the county.
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