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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 12, 2004
Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. will speak about his plans to revitalize older neighborhoods at the Greater Parkville Community Council meeting tonight. The meeting will take place at 7 p.m. at the Morningside House Assisted Living Facility, 8800 Old Harford Road. The public is invited. Information: 410-668-2580.
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NEWS
July 6, 2009
As it has for the last half century, Baltimore City's population continues to decline, albeit at a slightly slower pace than in recent decades. The Census Bureau reported last week that the city lost 3,231 people during the year that ended July 1, 2008. But while the drop in the city's population, which the bureau pegged at 636,919, was somewhat expected, the surprising news was that, for the first time in decades, Baltimore County lost residents as well. With 785,618 people, the county is still Maryland's third most populous jurisdiction, and the decline was modest - the bureau reported 212 fewer people living there than during the previous 12 months.
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NEWS
June 25, 1996
CAN BALTIMORE COUNTY protect rural areas and older neighborhoods by reducing zoning densities and still leave room for enough growth to keep the county economically sound? The County Council must answer this question as it prepares to vote this fall on 483 rezoning requests.There is no question that the zoning in the rural north should be made as restrictive as possible to protect reservoir watersheds, to preserve open space and because the county cannot afford to extend sewer and water there.
BUSINESS
By Nzong Xiong and Nzong Xiong,McClatchy-Tribune | April 6, 2008
The image of a home surrounded by a white picket fence has always stayed with Lynne Gibbs of Clovis, Calif. "To me, it represented the all-American dream," says Gibbs, 63, a retired paralegal. "It was why I wanted one. When I was growing up, the white picket fence meant harmony with your house, your family, your spouse. Everybody wanted the house with a picket fence." The dream became a reality for Gibbs when she bought the last lot at the end of the street in a new subdivision. Before she and her husband moved in 2005, she went to Lowe's and bought some vinyl white picket fencing.
NEWS
December 8, 1997
WE WILL SOON discover whether providing $40 million in low-interest mortgages to homebuyers in communities such as Anne Arundel's Brooklyn Park and Baltimore County's Gwynn Oak is an effective preservation tool.Last week, 34 communities in Maryland, from Salisbury to Cumberland, were awarded grants designed to shore up established neighborhoods that are beginning to decline.The thinking behind the program -- part of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's farsighted "smart growth" initiative -- is sound.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1996
Hoping to slow runaway suburban sprawl, Gov. Parris N. Glendening said yesterday the state will spend more than $46 million to spruce up decaying commercial districts and help families buy homes in older neighborhoods.The governor announced $40 million in low-interest mortgage loans for more than 500 borrowers -- including funds solely for home sales in older neighborhoods in Baltimore County and other aging suburbs."Targeting parts of the state fosters smart growth, instead of encouraging creeping sprawl that eats up open space," Glendening said.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Liz Atwood and Dail Willis and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1999
Baltimore County's ZIP code 21244 stretches from the bustling Beltway to rolling hills and farms along the Patapsco River and Brice Run, but its population is clustered in the older neighborhoods that flank Interstate 695.Something else is clustered in those west-side neighborhoods: group homes serving a statewide population of troubled teens and disabled adults. ZIP code 21244 includes 63 state-licensed group homes, the highest concentration of such facilities in the state.More than a quarter of Maryland's 1,300 group homes are in Baltimore County, according to state licensing records.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2001
When the house at the end of the block turned into an eyesore, Melinda Hipsley proposed an elegant solution. Baltimore County could buy it, she said, and turn the oversized garage into a needed community meeting place. Or maybe another vacant lot nearby could become a small park - something lacking in the Ralston neighborhood near Pikesville. County officials balked at both ideas. "They told me they don't buy parcels of under an acre," said the 50-year-old hair salon owner and president of the Ralston Community Association.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2003
Westminster has received more than a quarter million dollars in state grants this month to help pay for two renovation projects and a program designed to encourage homeownership in older neighborhoods, city officials said. The city learned last week that it would receive a state Community Legacy grant worth $75,000, which will be split between the city's homeownership program and a project to upgrade street lights on Pennsylvania Avenue. The homeownership program will be given $25,000 to continue disbursing grants to potential homebuyers who are interested in purchasing older Victorian homes within the Old Town Westminster district, said Karen Blandford, manager of the city's Office of Housing and Community Development.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1997
Citing concerns that money might be wasted, the Baltimore County Council last night delayed a vote to spend $10,000 for an experimental program designed to encourage workers to buy homes near their jobs.The bill was withdrawn by Councilman Stephen G. Sam Moxley, a Catonsville Democrat, who wanted to address concerns by several council members about how the money is spent."I asked that it be withdrawn at this point in order to discuss it further with the other council members," Moxley said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 12, 2004
Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. will speak about his plans to revitalize older neighborhoods at the Greater Parkville Community Council meeting tonight. The meeting will take place at 7 p.m. at the Morningside House Assisted Living Facility, 8800 Old Harford Road. The public is invited. Information: 410-668-2580.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2004
They stripped the decades-old wallpaper in the dining room and repainted the walls yellow, took the paper down in the living room and replaced it with textured paint meant to look like granite. In the master bedroom, they ripped out the carpet to expose the hardwood floors. Chris Killinger and his wife, Emily, both 25, have been busy fixing up a circa-1940s bungalow-style house in the Pennsylvania Avenue area of Westminster. With the help of a city government program designed to encourage investment in older neighborhoods, the couple can use money they otherwise would have spent buying the home to pay for the renovations.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2003
Westminster has received more than a quarter million dollars in state grants this month to help pay for two renovation projects and a program designed to encourage homeownership in older neighborhoods, city officials said. The city learned last week that it would receive a state Community Legacy grant worth $75,000, which will be split between the city's homeownership program and a project to upgrade street lights on Pennsylvania Avenue. The homeownership program will be given $25,000 to continue disbursing grants to potential homebuyers who are interested in purchasing older Victorian homes within the Old Town Westminster district, said Karen Blandford, manager of the city's Office of Housing and Community Development.
NEWS
By Daniel Rosen | October 7, 2003
LIKE OTHER aging suburbs, Baltimore County faces a number of challenges: astronomical housing prices, spreading suburban sprawl, disappearing forests and farms, declining shopping centers and malls and struggling older neighborhoods. The county's quadrennial rezoning process, now under way, could offer a solution. But only if the zoning categories and development process in the county's older communities are modernized. The days of replacing an old strip of stores with a new strip of stores or a "big box" store are over; another raft of retail on a sea of asphalt won't rescue the county's older neighborhoods.
NEWS
June 30, 2003
BALTIMORE COUNTY Executive James T. Smith Jr. is on the right track in seeking broader tax breaks for developers in aging Beltway neighborhoods, and the County Council should support him. Since the mid-1970s, five previous county administrations have recognized the fragility of such pre-World War II population centers as Arbutus, Woodlawn, Catonsville, Pikesville, Overlea, Dundalk and Essex. Various tactics have been employed over the years to attract more private investment capital for revitalization, but the results have been spotty.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2003
Kembo Road, in the shadow of the city, leads to a chemical manufacturer, a steel fabricator, a trucking company and mounds of muck cleared from the Baltimore Harbor. A perfect place, neighbors decided, for some preserved land. Now 116 acres in that industrial swath is guaranteed to remain woods and wetlands, a green island in a gritty area between Baltimore and the dense neighborhoods of Glen Burnie and Pasadena. Land preservation, so often about saving amber fields of grain, is increasingly gaining popularity in urban and inner-suburban communities across the nation as grass-roots groups try to protect slices of nature - sometimes as small as a fraction of an acre - in places they feel could desperately use a break from pavement.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1998
Convinced that Baltimore County has too many run-down older homes and apartments that might attract troublesome tenants, the Ruppersberger administration is moving to create a local cash fund -- free of federal constraints -- to finance demolitions and renovations.County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger's proposed capital budget earmarks about $4.2 million for that purpose, including $1.1 million left from bond referendums. In addition, a $2 million bond issue for community improvements will appear on November's ballot.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2002
As open land disappears and real estate prices soar, communities built decades ago are becoming the next growth frontier in Howard County - to the dismay of some who live there. Landowners are subdividing generous yards and putting up two, four, even six or more new houses where one had stood. Ellicott City residents - complaining that this "infill" development is breeding sore-thumb buildings on odd-shaped lots that dump traffic onto roads meant for fewer vehicles - are demanding new laws to regulate small subdivisions.
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