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NEWS
January 21, 2014
There's been a fair amount of correspondence from letter writers and right-wing pundits savaging President Obama's foreign policy ( "Syria and Iran are U.S. foreign policy disasters," Jan. 4). They all have in common one thing, namely being keen on saber-rattling and committing U.S. troops to trouble spots around the world, particularly in the Middle East. It is tempting to be dismissive of these Monday morning quarterbacks and armchair warriors while the debacles in Iraq and Afghanistan continue to fester.
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NEWS
January 21, 2014
There's been a fair amount of correspondence from letter writers and right-wing pundits savaging President Obama's foreign policy ( "Syria and Iran are U.S. foreign policy disasters," Jan. 4). They all have in common one thing, namely being keen on saber-rattling and committing U.S. troops to trouble spots around the world, particularly in the Middle East. It is tempting to be dismissive of these Monday morning quarterbacks and armchair warriors while the debacles in Iraq and Afghanistan continue to fester.
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BUSINESS
By San Francisco Examiner | July 17, 1995
SAN FRANCISCO -- Howard Summers would have been a great guest on the old TV quiz show, "I've Got a Secret."Mr. Summers, a 57-year-old product development engineer who was the victim of a job reshuffle at the Silicon Valley Group, has carefully stripped his resume of anything that would reveal his age.College graduation and employment dates are gone. His cover letters don't mention that he has 35 years of experience. Instead, he says he's been working only 15 years.After attending self-esteem workshops, Mr. Summers now concentrates on positive thinking exercises as he drives to interviews.
LIFESTYLE
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2011
It's Men's Health Week, and public health officials are encouraging men to pay more attention to their bodies. Not only should they be paying more attention to little changes that don't seem right, they should be getting annual checkups. Diseases common in older men such as prostate cancer can be treated when found early, and other conditions can be prevented from getting worse, says Mercy Medical Center urologist Dr. Ira Hantman. How often do men need to get a general checkup, and what do doctors look for?
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 2, 2003
CHICAGO -- Now that science has concluded that the long-term risks of hormone replacement outweigh the benefits for postmenopausal women, men may get their day. A task force led by the Institute of Medicine and supported by the National Institute on Aging will evaluate the feasibility of conducting clinical trials of testosterone replacement in older men. The idea of convening a panel of experts arose in part because of growing concern that men are...
FEATURES
By Jane E. Brody and Jane E. Brody,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 10, 1996
Men may be justified, though incorrect, in thinking that they are invulnerable to osteoporosis.This bone-wasting disease occurs slowly and silently and has been labeled "a woman's disease" because women are far more vulnerable to it and the fractures it causes. Half of all women develop it, and one woman in two over the age of 65 suffers one or more bone fractures because of it.But men get osteoporosis, too, and 20 percent of American men will suffer at least one fracture because their bones have become too thin and weak to withstand the normal stresses of life.
FEATURES
By Warren Epstein and Warren Epstein,Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph | June 17, 1992
For women over 50, looking for Mr. Right can be like looking for a winning ticket on the floor of a race track.They buy personal ads. They join singles groups. They hire dating services.But the odds are against them."Women live longer, and the single men in that age range usually prefer women younger than themselves -- sometimes much younger," says Donna Shugrue, manager of Perfectly Matched, a Colorado Springs, Colo., dating service. "If we had a man over 50 wanting to date in his own age range, we'd get very excited."
NEWS
February 14, 2000
Will prosecuting older men protect girls against abuse? Prosecuting older men who have sex with girls who have not even reached the age of 16 would not just reduce the pregnancy rate in Maryland ("Md. looks to rape laws to cut teen birth rates," Feb. 5). More important, it would stop many young ladies from being used and abused by so-called men who view children as sex objects to be exploited. Regardless how physically developed these young women may be, they still have the mind of a child -- which is what makes them easy prey for older men. In my opinion, any man who would have sex with a child needs to be locked up. This might not eliminate the teen-age pregnancy problem.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1998
For years, it seemed, senior citizens centers could have hung out a "For Women Only" sign.Not anymore.From billiards to barbers, centers for seniors have launched all-out drives to lure more men by gearing more programs to them. Civil War history? Mostly men.Computer labs? Mostly men.Flavored vinegar-making courses? Half men.In a state where about 44 percent of the 55-and-over population is male, an estimated 30 percent of attendees at senior citizen center programs are men, say local officials for aging.
NEWS
By Newsday | October 10, 1991
POSTPONING the vote on his nomination was the most responsible action the Senate has taken in the wake of the charge of sexual harassment against Clarence Thomas. Up to then, law professor Anita Hill's charge that the Supreme Court nominee made lewd and intimidating comments to her when she worked for him in two different federal jobs had been handled nearly as unprofessionally as Thomas allegedly acted.Democratic leaders, shocked at the turmoil that their failure to confront Hill's charge provoked, maneuvered all day to block the vote.
FEATURES
January 10, 2008
Obesity Teen girls' popularity may affect their weights Where a teenage girl sees herself on her school's social ladder may sway her future weight, a study of more than 4,000 girls finds. Those who believed they were unpopular gained more weight over a two-year period than girls who viewed themselves as more popular. Researchers said the study shows how a girl's view of her social status has broader health consequences. The girls in the study were still growing -- their average age was 15 -- and all of them gained some weight.
NEWS
By Josh Goldstein and Josh Goldstein,McClatchy-Tribune | December 15, 2006
For years, doctors have urged older men with early-stage, low-risk prostate cancer to "watch and wait" -- skip treatment until tests showed the cancer was growing aggressively. Now, a study suggests there's a significant benefit from treating men older than 65 surgically or with radiation therapy. "We found that men who had either a radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy within six months of their prostate cancer diagnosis were 30 percent less likely to die than those who did not undergo treatment," said Yu-Ning Wong, a medical oncologist at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia and lead author of the study.
NEWS
By CARA MIA DIMASSA AND RICHARD WINTON and CARA MIA DIMASSA AND RICHARD WINTON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 20, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- Two women in their 70s were arrested this week after they allegedly befriended two homeless men, took out 19 life insurance policies on them and filed claims worth more than $2.2 million after the transients mysteriously died in hit-and-run pedestrian accidents in Los Angeles, police said. One of the men was hit by a car and killed in an alley in 1999, and the second victim was run down last June. Detectives said they connected the two cases several months ago during a chance meeting between two investigators in the LAPD's West Traffic Bureau squad room.
NEWS
By PETER GORNER and PETER GORNER,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 21, 2006
Mature adults in countries where men and women hold equal status had more satisfying sex lives than those in male-dominated societies, according to a study billed as the first of its kind to document and compare sexual behavior and satisfaction among middle-aged and older people worldwide. Surveying 27,500 men and women between the ages of 40 and 80 who live in 29 countries, researchers at the University of Chicago found that people reported the greatest sexual satisfaction in Western countries including Austria, Canada and the United States.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 2, 2003
CHICAGO -- Now that science has concluded that the long-term risks of hormone replacement outweigh the benefits for postmenopausal women, men may get their day. A task force led by the Institute of Medicine and supported by the National Institute on Aging will evaluate the feasibility of conducting clinical trials of testosterone replacement in older men. The idea of convening a panel of experts arose in part because of growing concern that men are...
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Erika Niedowski and Jonathan Bor and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2002
While women may have achieved a grim parity with men in contracting the AIDS virus worldwide, experts in the United States remain concerned about the disease's rebound among young gay men. Today's epidemic has not brought the devastation seen in the 1980s and early 1990s, when AIDS cut a swath through the gay community. But health officials and activists say they are alarmed by high rates among gay teen-agers and young adults - some of whom were not alive during the urgent safe-sex campaigns of those days.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | July 17, 2001
THANKS TO AN inflamed press, parents with children out of college - parents who might have been sighing with relief for the first time in 20 years - are realizing that they have to talk to their adult daughters about the dangers of having affairs with powerful, married, older men. The affair between Congressman Gary Condit - 53, married, with grown children and everything to lose - and the intern - 24, pretty, alone in a big city, star-struck and completely...
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2000
Tare Evans was only 12 when she started going out with her first real boyfriend -- a boyfriend old enough to vote. He was 18 and, in her young mind, "a man," who would introduce her to the world. Turn him in for statutory rape? The Baltimore girl wouldn't have dreamed of telling her mother -- much less the police -- they were having sex. "Honestly, I figured a young boy wouldn't know much," said Evans, now 18 and a mother of two by a different man. "This is what I wanted to do. At least I thought it was what I wanted to do."
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara | December 27, 2001
ONE NIGHT long ago in Argentina, I witnessed a drama on the Avenida de Mayo, which stretches from the presidential palace to the brooding pile that houses the national congress. Hundreds of young men marched singing the forbidden anthems of the Peronists into an encounter with another group of men - older men, on horseback, armed with pistols and nightsticks. It was a lively fight: The air filled with vivid curses, acrid clouds of gas; ball bearings were released over the asphalt to upend the horses.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | July 17, 2001
THANKS TO AN inflamed press, parents with children out of college - parents who might have been sighing with relief for the first time in 20 years - are realizing that they have to talk to their adult daughters about the dangers of having affairs with powerful, married, older men. The affair between Congressman Gary Condit - 53, married, with grown children and everything to lose - and the intern - 24, pretty, alone in a big city, star-struck and completely...
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