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NEWS
February 19, 2013
If there is some good to arise from the tragic death of Nathan Krasnopoler - the 20-year-old Johns Hopkins University student killed while riding his bicycle on University Parkway by an 83-year-old driver who didn't notice him in the bike lane - it may be to call greater attention to the dangers of Maryland's aging driver population. Today, Mr. Krasnopoler's parents were in Annapolis to brief the House Environmental Matters Committee on the latest data provided by the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration documenting the threat.
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NEWS
February 19, 2013
If there is some good to arise from the tragic death of Nathan Krasnopoler - the 20-year-old Johns Hopkins University student killed while riding his bicycle on University Parkway by an 83-year-old driver who didn't notice him in the bike lane - it may be to call greater attention to the dangers of Maryland's aging driver population. Today, Mr. Krasnopoler's parents were in Annapolis to brief the House Environmental Matters Committee on the latest data provided by the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration documenting the threat.
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NEWS
By DOUG BIRCH | February 11, 1991
Last month, an 83-year-old Pikesville man turning left into a shopping center on Liberty Road pulled in front of an approaching school bus, causing it to collide with his right rear fender.The driver of the car, who had been cited for failing to obey a traffic signal several months earlier, was not hurt. Twenty high school students had minor injuries."He saw the bus coming and all that. He said he just thought that he had time to make it across the road," said Baltimore County Police Officer Joseph Gibson, the who investigated the crash.
NEWS
March 26, 2011
The case of the bicyclist who was hit by a car and remains in a coma is truly sad ("Family of comatose bicyclist sues 83-year-old driver" March 23), but the other underlining story is the 83 year-old who was driving the car. The problem lies with the legislators and MVA for allowing renewals of drivers licenses as long as fees are paid. My father-in-law was 91 when he last renewed his license. The eye doctor wouldn't sign off because he needed glasses. He went to MVA and they told him the same thing, but the tester, who had his driver's license in her hand, gave him back his license when he complained he had two more months left on it. Instead of suspending the license, she handed it back and he continued to drive.
NEWS
By Dolly Merritt and Dolly Merritt,Contributing Writer | January 20, 1993
Some of the 28 students who filled a classroom at the Florence Bain Senior Center last week were returning to a topic ** they hadn't studied in 50 years: how to drive a car.But accident prevention and a chance to reduce their insurance premiums were motive enough to participate in the two-day class, sponsored by the center and the American Association of Retired Persons.The course, "55 Alive," is so named because research indicates that physical changes and car accidents accelerate after drivers turn 55. The course costs $8."
NEWS
By Dolly Merritt and Dolly Merritt,Special to The Sun | March 30, 1994
For many seniors, a driver's license means independence. As a result, older drivers continue to drive in spite of failing reflexes that can result from a number of health-related causes.To help drivers and their families cope with such problems, Horizon Health & Rehabilitation Inc., in Ellicott City, offers a driver's evaluation program, called the Return to Driving Program.The privately run program is one of three similar driving &r evaluation programs in the state that assess elderly drivers' abilities to process information and to react.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1999
A major study of the skills of older drivers is falling short of its goal in Howard County, with too few elderly motorists willing to participate.Only 150 people -- of the 650 hoped for -- have volunteered for the 20-minute screenings since they began at county senior centers in March, making officials question whether such a program can work in community-based settings. So Howard County, which is playing an important role in the statewide study, plans a mass mailing to senior citizens to increase participation.
TRAVEL
By Korky Vann and By Korky Vann,Special to the Sun | June 2, 2002
As the weather warms and days get longer, millions of senior citizens take to the road to vacation and visit family. But before they hit the road, experts say, they should have their vision checked, because changes in aging eyes require extra attention. Compared with their counterparts from previous generations, today's elderly are healthier, more active and more likely to hold a driver's license longer. But as people age, sight, hearing, reflexes and ability to judge speed and distance diminish.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1998
Moving gingerly into a politically touchy area, Maryland officials are launching a study this week aimed at spotting -- and helping -- the elderly driver who might pose a danger on the highway because of failing body or mind.Starting tomorrow, the Motor Vehicle Administration will ask older drivers to take a no-risk battery of tests designed to measure their agility, memory and vision.Officials stress that the tests, to be offered at three MVA branch offices and at senior centers around the state, will not affect the volunteers' driving privileges.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1999
A new future for elderly motorists across the nation -- including millions who might otherwise have to give up driving -- could take shape over the next two years because of a Maryland project that is the most comprehensive study ever of older drivers.The study, which is being watched nationally, has two objectives: to develop sophisticated driving tests that can spot people at risk for accidents early on and to identify ways to help seniors remain safely behind the wheel as long as possible.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | June 30, 2008
In 1953, K. Dale Williams Sr. bought a new Plymouth for $1,975. That was a wince-worthy sum back then, but Williams remembers cringing even more when he was offered - for $13 more - a handy-dandy little gadget called a turn signal. "It was an option back then, turn signals," Williams, 77, said. "And back-up lights." Over the years, Williams has learned that turn signals are far from optional; they're vital. As are such good driving practices as checking mirrors and blind spots before moving an inch, merging smoothly and safely, and adhering to the three-second rule when following another car. As district coordinator of AARP's Safe Driving Program for motorists 50 and older, Williams has been teaching lessons like those to drivers in his peer group since 2001.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN REPORTER | June 6, 2008
Josephine Montesion has been driving her 1995 Chevy Lumina for years. But it was just this week that the 83-year-old Ellicott City resident learned where the horn is and how to adjust the steering wheel. "I've never had to blow the horn," she said. Montesion and several other older drivers gained automobile insight by taking their vehicles to Centennial Park in Ellicott City for "Car Fit," a program sponsored by the county police Wednesday. Several police officers joined a group of occupational therapists and spent the day helping seniors learn tips on operating their vehicles - including things they might have forgotten or never known.
NEWS
June 27, 2007
AACC registration at senior centers Anne Arundel Community College is holding summer registration at all county senior centers. The Annapolis, Pasadena, Pascal and O'Malley senior centers will also offer the pilot STARS program. Students who have previously taken a class through the college and who pay using a credit card can register via telephone. Students will also be able to register for classes at the centers: The Annapolis Senior Center, 191 S. Villa Ave., 410-222-1216. Pasadena Senior Center, 4103 Mountain Road, 410-222-0030.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 19, 2004
WASHINGTON - Drivers over 65 are nearly twice as likely to be killed in a serious automobile crash as those ages 55 to 64, according to a study released yesterday. The study of nearly 4 million motor vehicle accident reports in Texas over 25 years from 1975 to 1999 found that the older a driver, the more likely that driver is to be killed in an accident where at least one person was injured. The study noted that older drivers tend to be more frail and might die from injuries that would not be fatal to younger drivers.
NEWS
May 9, 2007
Volunteers sought for senior aid The county Department of Aging and Disabilities is seeking volunteers age 55 and older to aid seniors in the community and other residents. Programs include tax assistance, nutrition sites, tutors and mentors in schools, as well as administrative support for state and county police. Information: 410-222-4464. Older drivers can have skills assessed Volunteers at the Maryland Association of Highway Safety Leaders are offering drivers age 60 and older a driving health inventory.
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