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By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | April 15, 1994
Six years ago, East Towson appeared headed for extinction. Baltimore County had designated the historic African-American community for intense business development and high-density housing.Now, it is being cited as an example of how an aging county community can be given new life.What happened in East Towson is what County Executive Roger B. Hayden had in mind yesterday when he announced plans to form an urban community conservation program."We have to preserve and protect these vital older communities," Mr. Hayden said after his annual budget address to the County Council.
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BUSINESS
Yvonne Wenger | April 12, 2012
Mark your calendars for area housing expos and events intended to provide information on the housing market, anti-discrimination practices and increasing homeownership. Below you'll find a round up of some upcoming events.   -          Friday,  11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Oak Crest retirement community's annual Home Expo in Crestview Hall at 8800 Walther Boulevard in Parkville. Attendees can tour apartments and attend seminars to learn about the community's realty and moving services.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Marego Athans and Kris Antonelli contributed to this article | April 15, 1997
Spurred by a brighter economy, Baltimore County's executive proposed a $1.5 billion budget yesterday that avoids a tax increase while strengthening schools, police and older communities such as Towson, Lansdowne and Dundalk.C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger's 1997-1998 plan, which funds all priorities for county classrooms, continues the cooperation between county and school officials that began last year -- and should avert the squabbling that has marked some previous budgets.It would add dozens of teachers and police officers.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2011
Pushing waterlogged belongings out the front door of her duplex, Suzy Cunningham trod over a buckle in the floorboards. "Our porch went all to hell," she lamented as she cleaned up last month after Tropical Storm Lee. "Their ain't a floor in Port Deposit that's even. " Nor was it the first time the waters of the Susquehanna River had rushed through this Cecil County town that locals call "Port. " Most of the houses built in the lowlands between the river and North Main Street show the scars of decades of flooding.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | August 8, 1996
Using low-interest loans, school construction plans and road-building funds, Maryland has begun an assault on suburban sprawl.The financial incentives and policy changes are the first steps in a move to encourage residents to forgo new housing developments and live in older communities such as Towson and Catonsville. And more could come -- Gov. Parris N. Glendening has told state agencies to scrutinize their procedures and policies, exposing any that favor new development over redevelopment.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1995
In a bid to relieve congestion and revive Baltimore County's older suburbs, community groups and government planners are seeking more restrictive zoning for nearly 3,000 acres amid the Beltway neighborhoods.On the east side, the effort is aimed at encouraging construction of single-family homes in communities that are overloaded with apartments and townhouses. On the west side, residents want to prevent builders from crowding homes onto vacant land.As part of the county's comprehensive rezoning, more than 40 neighborhood groups filed requests for zoning changes, compared with the 25 that filed petitions during the last round in 1992, said Gary L. Kerns, chief of comprehensive and community planning.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | January 31, 1994
The Baltimore County Planning Board has endorsed legislation that officials view as a key to revitalizing the county's older commercial and industrial areas.The Planned Unit Development (PUD) bill would allow redevelopment of many commercial properties without requiring a zoning change, something that can take up to four years.By directing economic reinvestment to older communities inside the Beltway, the bill would discourage developers from looking to rural areas for new commercial ventures, Planning Director P. David Fields told the board Thursday.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | February 22, 1995
Harold G. Reid, former chairman of the Baltimore County Planning Board, was named yesterday to a $40,000-a-year post as Westside coordinator for the county's Community Conservation Program.Mr. Reid is the first black to be appointed by County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger III, who took office in December.Mr. Ruppersberger also named Lynn Barranger, a volunteer in his political campaign and a community activist, to fill a similar part-time role in the Lansdowne-Baltimore Highlands area of the southwestern part of the county.
NEWS
By Pat Gilbert and Pat Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | June 29, 1994
After much political posturing and chest-thumping yesterday, the Baltimore County Council appears ready to give final approval next Tuesday to two resolutions crucial to the Honeygo Community Plan.During a public work session, members argued over fine points of the plan and peppered county planners with questions about Honeygo, regarded as the most ambitious planned residential community in county history. Most said afterward they would vote to approve it.On June 20, the council delayed action on the resolutions after the last-minute introduction of 30 "technical" amendments to the plan by the administration of Executive Roger B. Hayden.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1996
As Baltimore County runs out of new tracts of land to develop, businesses, residents and government planners are rediscovering the virtues of older communities. In the process, they're instilling new hope for aging suburbs.Already, signs of the redevelopment scramble -- crucial in maintaining the county's stability -- are evident across the county.Developers have poured millions of dollars into renovating tired shopping districts such as Westview Mall, Perring Plaza and Eastpoint Mall. Homeowners are fixing up Victorians in Catonsville and colonials in Anneslie.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2003
Cissell Avenue in North Laurel is pockmarked by the ravages of rain. It has swept so much dirt from Ron Giddings' front yard that his cable lines are exposed. It has knocked the foundation out from under a neighbor's mailbox. It has eaten away at the ditches beside the road, rushed underneath the old pavement and triggered collapses. And water regularly pools on Donna Thewes' property even though she put in two extra sump pumps and French drains all around her house. The Howard County neighborhood is a potent reminder of the unintended effects of man altering the landscape without fully accounting for the wrath of Mother Nature.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2002
Pam Wissman stood one afternoon last week outside the small, white prefab rancher where she and her husband raised their children, chatting with her neighbor and digging a hole for a new plant in the side yard. If all of Baltimore County were melted down, if all of its horse farms mixed with its rowhouses, its suburban tract homes with its stately Victorians, its black neighborhoods with its white, its poor with its rich, its young with its old, it would produce a neighborhood much like hers.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2001
When the house at the end of the block turned into an eyesore, Melinda Hipsley proposed an elegant solution. Baltimore County could buy it, she said, and turn the oversized garage into a needed community meeting place. Or maybe another vacant lot nearby could become a small park - something lacking in the Ralston neighborhood near Pikesville. County officials balked at both ideas. "They told me they don't buy parcels of under an acre," said the 50-year-old hair salon owner and president of the Ralston Community Association.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Marego Athans and Kris Antonelli contributed to this article | April 15, 1997
Spurred by a brighter economy, Baltimore County's executive proposed a $1.5 billion budget yesterday that avoids a tax increase while strengthening schools, police and older communities such as Towson, Lansdowne and Dundalk.C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger's 1997-1998 plan, which funds all priorities for county classrooms, continues the cooperation between county and school officials that began last year -- and should avert the squabbling that has marked some previous budgets.It would add dozens of teachers and police officers.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | August 8, 1996
Using low-interest loans, school construction plans and road-building funds, Maryland has begun an assault on suburban sprawl.The financial incentives and policy changes are the first steps in a move to encourage residents to forgo new housing developments and live in older communities such as Towson and Catonsville. And more could come -- Gov. Parris N. Glendening has told state agencies to scrutinize their procedures and policies, exposing any that favor new development over redevelopment.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1996
As Baltimore County runs out of new tracts of land to develop, businesses, residents and government planners are rediscovering the virtues of older communities. In the process, they're instilling new hope for aging suburbs.Already, signs of the redevelopment scramble -- crucial in maintaining the county's stability -- are evident across the county.Developers have poured millions of dollars into renovating tired shopping districts such as Westview Mall, Perring Plaza and Eastpoint Mall. Homeowners are fixing up Victorians in Catonsville and colonials in Anneslie.
NEWS
February 3, 1994
There is a truism about the rapid development of any community: New neighborhoods get a lot of attention, in the form of new roads and schools. And, as a consequence, those who live in older communities often feel neglected.Del. Virginia M. Thomas, D-13A, is proposing a way to deal more equitably with old and new neighborhoods by directing certain tax revenues to older schools in need of renovations and new equipment. Her intentions are commendable.Specifically, Delegate Thomas wants the state legislature to allow the county to direct funds from a proposed tax on parking to older schools.
BUSINESS
By Daniel H. Barkin and Daniel H. Barkin,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1996
The average size of the typical residential lot has grown by more than a third in Maryland since the mid-1980s, a reflection in part -- builders say -- of how difficult it has become to profitably develop higher-density housing that uses land more efficiently.In 1985, the average residential lot size of parcels five acres and less in Maryland was 0.42 acres. But home construction between 1985 and 1993 was on parcels averaging 0.57 acres, a nearly 36 percent increase, according to the Maryland Office of Planning.
NEWS
January 24, 1996
BALTIMORE COUNTY'S legislative agenda for this year in Annapolis reflects the stagnating local tax revenues that can no longer meet the demands of an older county that still has a burgeoning population of more than 100,000 school-age children.The priority is for state school construction funds, and for money to expand a teacher-mentor program in under-performing schools. County Executive C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger is asking for $15 million to build new schools and additions, to at least put a dent in serious overcrowding.
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