Advertisement
HomeCollectionsOlder Children
IN THE NEWS

Older Children

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1996
When Dimitri "Dema" Harrington, 8, was adopted by a Perry Hall family after five years in a Moscow orphanage, he entered a secure home -- and joined a wave of older children being adopted in Maryland.On a recent Friday morning, he sat giddily in the chambers of Baltimore County Circuit Judge John O. Hennegan waiting to have his adoption -- begun in a laborious flurry of paperwork in Moscow several years ago -- made final stateside.The judge signed the decree, then asked Dema if it was the best thing that had ever happened to him. "Yeah!"
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Changes to Baltimore's Head Start this fall will provide longer days and an extended school year for hundreds of children in its care, a move intended to help low-income parents free up time for work and boost the youngsters' development. Under a federal pilot initiative that gives the city more local control over the early education program, Head Start also will shift its focus to younger children by serving more of them, transferring many older children to pre-K programs in city schools.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 27, 2001
PROTECTING children riding in cars from serious injury -- or death -- is a constant parental concern. Youngsters below the age of 4 must, by law, be placed in car-safety seats. But how do you protect older children from harm? Auto-safety experts say kids ages 4 to 8 who weigh between 40 and 80 pounds, should be using a booster seat. This device positions a child so that the lap-and-shoulder seat belt fits properly. That's crucial because seat belts alone may not protect children in a crash.
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2014
Neighbors lit candles and laid stuffed animals Sunday at a makeshift shrine erected at the Germantown home of two toddlers who police say were killed by their mother and another woman as they tried to exorcise spirits from the children's bodies. "Why would someone do this?" said neighbor Zoe Gill, 62, who walked with her 10-year-old granddaughter Kylie Sunday to take a Mickey Mouse and white votive candles to the Cherry Bend Drive shrine. "I can't think of anything to say to Kylie to help her understand," she said.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | May 19, 1996
"Have you ever been punished for something you didn't do?" the boy asks. "We were."So begins "Remember the Children: Daniel's Story," the immensely powerful exhibit at the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington. It is designed to help older children begin to understand this horrific chapter of history through the eyes of a Jewish boy growing up in Nazi Germany."We want kids to think about how it all started -- name calling, excluding people, stereotyping," says Warren Marcus, who coordinates school and adult programs for the museum.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,Sun reporter | September 24, 2007
Barbara Schuyler-Haas Elder, an advocate of day care for school-age children and the first director of Baltimore's Office of Children and Youth, died of lung cancer Thursday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Bolton Hill resident was 83. "She was passionate about her work. Children were her life," said her daughter, Cynthia Lindsay Haas-Pundel of Bolton Hill. Ms. Elder was born in Trenton, N.J., and raised in nearby Burlington. She graduated from her hometown high school in 1939 and earned a bachelor's degree from Trenton State Teachers College in 1945.
FEATURES
By BEVERLY MILLS | July 23, 1995
Q: My 8-year-old son is sucking his thumb and will not give it up. How can we break him of this habit?-- Tim Richardson,Atlanta, Ga.A: At age 7 or older, this becomes a delicate situation. It is possible to help older children stop thumb sucking, but parents must know how and when to get involved.They must also be patient. Even under the best of circumstances, breaking the habit in older children usually takes a month to six weeks.The first thing parents need to do is bolster their resolve as to why it's important to go to the trouble it's going to take to end this destructive cycle.
NEWS
November 15, 2001
Sykesville and the state will share the cost of building two playground areas in the town's Millard Cooper Park. The state Office of Intergovernmental Relations awarded Sykesville a $44,000 grant last week. The grant requires a town match. Plans call for construction next spring of two playground pads connected by a pathway. The project covers about 1 acre in the tree-lined park along Route 32 at Cooper Drive. One play area will be for toddlers and the other will have more complex equipment for older children.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Evening Sun Staff | February 18, 1991
IN ANY STRESSFUL situation, there are things that people involved can do to ease the tension. So it is with family tensions stemming from the Persian Gulf war.Here are some suggestions for making life on the home front easier -- at dinner time as well as throughout the day:For children:* Reduce aggravation. Habits or activities -- dropping clothes on the floor or tying up the phone, for instance -- that normally disturb parents are bound to genuinely upset them if they are anxious about the war. Toni Ungaretti, a child development specialist, suggests that youngsters can help by doing whatever they can "so their parents are less aggravated."
NEWS
By Andew A. Green and Andew A. Green,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2001
Baltimore County officials dedicated a "super-accessible" playground for disabled children at Maiden Choice Center in Arbutus yesterday and promised to build four more. The county is halfway through a $5.9 million upgrade of all its 255 playgrounds to make them comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. But playgrounds like the one at Maiden Choice exceed those standards and allow children in wheelchairs to play alongside their friends in a way that wasn't possible before, said Terri Parrish, chairwoman of the county's Commission on Disabilities.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | November 6, 2013
It is a recommendation that is certain to cause huge family fights, followed by door-slamming, tears and covert attempts to subvert it. The American Academy of Pediatrics is recommending that parents limit their children's access to cell phones, the Internet and television, especially in their bedrooms and particularly after lights out. And it has recommended that its member doctors begin asking questions about electronic media use at well-child...
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis and The Record | December 19, 2012
Editor: With the recent tragedy in Connecticut, many of us are feeling the impact, as we question the safety of our children and loved ones. When a traumatic event occurs, we tend to become overwhelmed with a variety of emotions, including sadness, grief, helplessness and anxiety. In the aftermath of any trauma, there are certain strategies that can be helpful in moving forward: Provide reassurance of safety to children Limit media exposure of the event for yourself and your child In the weeks following a trauma, such as the shooting, children may have difficulty concentrating and remaining focused on their schoolwork.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2012
This school shooting in Newtown, Conn., is just devastating. I can't find words to express how my heart is breaking for these children, their families, the school staff, the community. I just want to go get my two boys and hug them forever. But how to talk to them about what's happened? Here are some tips for talking with children about violence against kids, from the Family Resource Center at Minneapolis Children's Hospital and Clinics for Family Information Services, Minneapolis, Minn .: Children are exposed to numerous accounts of violence against kids, such as abductions, murder, and random acts of terrorism.
NEWS
July 23, 2012
When your life is already in chaos, more chaos is likely to follow. But theAnnie E. Casey Foundationsays it won't let that happen to the children affected by its decision to close Casey Family Services this year ("Casey foundation ends foster care program," July 16). Given the foundation's outstanding record of serving the most vulnerable children over the last 36 years, I trust it will do everything possible to maintain stability for the kids in its program Casey's decision to remain committed to increasing adoption through increased awareness, education and technical assistance is laudable.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2011
A Baltimore man was sentenced Tuesday to life without parole plus 30 years in prison for the murder of his former wife and setting her Columbia apartment ablaze. Handing down the maximum sentence, Howard County Circuit Judge Richard Bernhardt told Damon Willie White, 36, that he had committed a "horrible, horrible crime that requires an appropriate response. " Not only had White taken a mother from her four children and the rest of her family, the judge said, but he endangered others by putting gasoline and a match to his victim's Long Reach apartment and then did not take responsibility for his actions.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,Sun reporter | September 24, 2007
Barbara Schuyler-Haas Elder, an advocate of day care for school-age children and the first director of Baltimore's Office of Children and Youth, died of lung cancer Thursday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Bolton Hill resident was 83. "She was passionate about her work. Children were her life," said her daughter, Cynthia Lindsay Haas-Pundel of Bolton Hill. Ms. Elder was born in Trenton, N.J., and raised in nearby Burlington. She graduated from her hometown high school in 1939 and earned a bachelor's degree from Trenton State Teachers College in 1945.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2011
A Baltimore man was sentenced Tuesday to life without parole plus 30 years in prison for the murder of his former wife and setting her Columbia apartment ablaze. Handing down the maximum sentence, Howard County Circuit Judge Richard Bernhardt told Damon Willie White, 36, that he had committed a "horrible, horrible crime that requires an appropriate response. " Not only had White taken a mother from her four children and the rest of her family, the judge said, but he endangered others by putting gasoline and a match to his victim's Long Reach apartment and then did not take responsibility for his actions.
NEWS
July 23, 2012
When your life is already in chaos, more chaos is likely to follow. But theAnnie E. Casey Foundationsays it won't let that happen to the children affected by its decision to close Casey Family Services this year ("Casey foundation ends foster care program," July 16). Given the foundation's outstanding record of serving the most vulnerable children over the last 36 years, I trust it will do everything possible to maintain stability for the kids in its program Casey's decision to remain committed to increasing adoption through increased awareness, education and technical assistance is laudable.
NEWS
By JANET ALBERT | December 15, 2006
With the following words, the poignant history of Remus Lyles' Clarksville family begins: "I give and bequeath to my servants Charles, Mary Ann and Lydia immediate freedom and twenty dollars each in cash ... " This excerpt from the last will and testament of Polly Owings Welling of Howard County is dated Aug. 16, 1852 - 13 years before slavery was abolished by the 13th Amendment to the United States Constitution at the conclusion of the Civil War in...
NEWS
By SUSAN GVOZDAS and SUSAN GVOZDAS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 9, 2006
Elaine and Kevan Shelly of Elkridge said they were pleasantly surprised by their summer visitors, 11-year-old Liana and her 10-year-old brother, Duvan. "They make their beds in the morning. They clean their plates and dishes," said Elaine Shelly, her eyes widening in disbelief. For the siblings - whose home is an orphanage in Bogota, Colombia - it is just part of the background of family life during their six-week stay with the Shellys under the auspices of Kidsave International, a nonprofit based in Washington that brings orphans from nations such as Columbia and Peru to the U.S. for six-week visits.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.