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BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | June 13, 2013
Recently, there's been a lot of focus on the financial exploitation of older adults. The FTC last month held a one-day workshop on senior identity theft , which highlighted some of the types of ID theft that older adults encounter. Yesterday, the Investor Protection Trust released an online survey of more than 600 doctors and nurses about investment and financial fraud against older adults. The nonprofit IPT offers an Elder Investment Fraud Financial Exploitation program that seeks to train medical professionals to recognize and report cases of elder financial abuse to authorities or others who can help.
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BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | June 13, 2013
Recently, there's been a lot of focus on the financial exploitation of older adults. The FTC last month held a one-day workshop on senior identity theft , which highlighted some of the types of ID theft that older adults encounter. Yesterday, the Investor Protection Trust released an online survey of more than 600 doctors and nurses about investment and financial fraud against older adults. The nonprofit IPT offers an Elder Investment Fraud Financial Exploitation program that seeks to train medical professionals to recognize and report cases of elder financial abuse to authorities or others who can help.
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NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff writer | May 3, 1992
At 96, Columbia resident Starks Kelly runs rings around his son Robert, 66, when it comes to recalling yesterday."He has a better memory than me," said Robert Kelly, laughing. "He can remember things I can't remember."For instance, his father can recall his living legacies."I have five children, 11 grandchildren, six great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren," he said, while his son struggled with the totals.Kelly was honored Friday at the Florence Bain Senior Center during a celebration of Older Americans Day in the county.
NEWS
May 7, 2013
Let's Get Organized - "Organizing for the Season," Wed., May 15, 10:30 a.m.-noon, Laurel-Beltsville Senior Activity Center, 7120 Contee Road. Judy Tiger, of Just That Simple, shares tips on putting away winter clothes and organizing for spring and summer. Sign up at registration in center lobby. 301-204-3350. "Power Over Pain" group - Sponsored by SPRING, Senior Peer Resources: Individuals, Networks and Groups, program of Howard County Office on Aging, Wed., May 15, 1-2:30 p.m., North Laurel 50+ Center, 9411 Whiskey Bottom Road.
NEWS
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Reporter | December 10, 2006
Westminster photographer Susan Ruddick Bloom has led photo tours throughout the world, written a book on computer-generated fine art and taught several generations of photographers at McDaniel College and at summer workshops in Maine, Florida and New Mexico. So imagine her surprise at receiving a flurry of press attention for her latest venture: Writing the weekly "expert" photo blog for Eons.com, a new social networking Web site for Americans age 50 and older. Before the Web site sought her services, the 58-year-old photographer had never even read a blog, much less written one. Since word began spreading about Eons, dubbed a "MySpace" for baby boomers, Bloom has appeared in The Christian Science Monitor, on Retirement Living Television and even in American Way, the inflight magazine of American Airlines.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2003
It's a time-worn story: Mom and Pop finally reach retirement age, sell the old family home and head south to a blissful retirement under Florida palms. But new reports on domestic migration from the 2000 census suggest that many of the oldest snowbirds are returning north near the end of their lives, perhaps to go "home" again, or to be closer, as they grow frailer, to their adult children. Florida, still the nation's most popular retirement destination, with a net gain of 149,000 people age 65 and older during the last half of the 1990s, recorded a net "outmigration" of the very old -- people age 85 and older, the bureau said in a report released today.
NEWS
February 17, 2006
Did you know?--Nine out of 10 hip fractures in older Americans are the result of a fall. -- National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
NEWS
April 14, 1991
Here is a list of publications which contain information about housing for seniors:The Continuing Care Retirement Community: A Guidebook for Consumers. Published by the American Association of Homes for the Aging. Send a self-addressed stamped envelope for a catalog to: AAHA, 901 E Street NW, Suite 500, Washington, D.C. 20004. $4 plus shipping and handling. Literature also available.Housing Options for Older Americans (D12063), and the Continuing Care Retirement Communities Fact Sheet (D12181)
NEWS
January 14, 1994
STUDENTS at Yale University have devised an interesting way to relieve stress during that most dreaded time of college life, final exams. Dressed in little more than their sneakers, a few undergraduate males ran through the Yale library last month shouting "Merry Christmas!" and pelting students buried deep in thought with candy.Streaking on college campuses is really nothing unusual. The University of Virginia and Princeton (home of the infamous Nude Olympics) have long traditions of such naked jaunts.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2011
Maryland, like the rest of the country, is aging. The state's 65-and-over population increased by more than 18 percent in the past 10 years to 707,642, according to the U.S. census. This group will only grow as baby boomers — those born between 1946 and 1965 — turn grayer. One of the most vocal advocates for older Americans is the AARP, which represents members who are 50 and older. While Social Security and Medicare have remained priorities for the organization, in Maryland it also focuses on more local issues such as lower electricity rates and reliability standards for utilities.
EXPLORE
By Pat Farmer | April 25, 2013
May is Older Americans Month! The Administration for Community Living and the Administration on Aging, which come under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, continue this great tradition and their commitment to recognizing the valuable contributions older adults make in communities across our country. This year's theme is "Unleash the Power of Age. " The Administration for Community Living's website, http://www.olderamericansmonth.acl.gov , states, "Every older American has a wealth of talents, experiences, and interests worth celebrating.
NEWS
By Hank Greenberg | December 3, 2012
The way some people talk in Washington, you could get the idea that Social Security and Medicare are little more than numbers in a budget. Yet for families in Maryland and all over America, Social Security and Medicare have a deeper meaning: They are the very foundation of security in retirement. Social Security and Medicare enable millions of older Americans to survive financially each month, after years of working hard and paying taxes to earn these protections. One day, younger people will count on these same pillars of security for their own independence and dignity in old age. Here are a couple numbers that lawmakers considering cuts to these programs should keep in mind: Half of America's seniors get by on less than $20,000 a year.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | November 13, 2012
In the days following Barack Obama's re-election, we learned that Mr. Obama didn't win because voters trusted him more than Mitt Romney on the economy, or because he ended the Iraq war and killed Osama bin Laden. He didn't win because he started to turn around an economy that shrank by 4 percent in his predecessor's final 15 months. He didn't win because his advisers built a state-of-the-art field organization that overpowered the Romney campaign's beached "Orca" targeting program. No: President Obama won re-election because Americans want "free stuff," and millions of lazy takers-not-makers gave him another four years to dish out the goodies.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. walker | May 1, 2012
Baltimore health officials have launched a program they hope will give paramedics more information to treat the elderly and people with disabilities. They are asking people to fill out Gold Card forms that will list crucial health information, such as whether someone suffers from diabetes. The Gold Card can then be displayed visibly in a person's home or carried in a wallet. If there is ever a medical emergency this will help medical staff with treatment options and decrease the likelihood of complications, health officials hope.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2011
Maryland, like the rest of the country, is aging. The state's 65-and-over population increased by more than 18 percent in the past 10 years to 707,642, according to the U.S. census. This group will only grow as baby boomers — those born between 1946 and 1965 — turn grayer. One of the most vocal advocates for older Americans is the AARP, which represents members who are 50 and older. While Social Security and Medicare have remained priorities for the organization, in Maryland it also focuses on more local issues such as lower electricity rates and reliability standards for utilities.
NEWS
By Renée Winsky | July 25, 2011
In the scramble to cut the nation's debt burden, President Obama, congressional Democrats and even some Republicans have proposed squeezing money out of Medicare by changing the way it pays forprescription drugs. They claim this would save $112 billion over 10 years. But if passed it would be a disaster, costing hundreds of thousands of jobs in the biopharmaceutical industry - an important contributor to the Maryland economy - driving up drug prices and discouraging drug innovation.
NEWS
December 19, 1994
WHEN Newt Gingrich, the House Speaker in Waiting, decided to do away with taxpayer funding for congressional caucuses, he struck the right chord for many Americans who view these appendages as a flagrant example of unnecessary (and liberal) government spending.Clearly, the caucus-syndrome had gotten out of hand.A review of the 28 groups that had permission from the House Administration Committee to receive free space and equipment and to receive contributions from a representative's office account to hire staff shows how ludicrous it had become.
NEWS
By C. William Jones | January 6, 2009
As the U.S. economy continues its meltdown, it is unthinkable that the retirees who fought wars and built our nation through decades of labor, earning post-employment pensions and medical benefits, are among those being faulted for America's economic problems. Lately, economists, talk-show hosts, journalists and even politicians have been echoing the corporate-speak by tagging baby boomers and retirees' earned pensions and health benefits as "legacy costs" dragging our nation down. The Miriam-Webster dictionary defines legacy as a "gift by will, especially of money or other personal property; bequest; something transmitted or received from an ancestor or predecessor."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 30, 2007
Millions of Americans with respiratory diseases have relied on oxygen equipment delivered to their homes to help them breathe. A basic setup, deliveries of small oxygen tanks for three years, can be bought from pharmacies and other retailers for as little as $3,500, or about $100 a month. Unless, that is, the buyer is Medicare, the government health care program for older Americans. Despite enormous buying power, Medicare pays far more. Rather than buy oxygen equipment outright, Medicare rents it for 36 months before patients take ownership, and pays for services that critics say are often unnecessary.
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