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FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | October 21, 2002
There are some who would say that my visit to this weekend's Oktoberfest put on by the Brewers Association of Maryland was a cheap, transparent excuse to carouse, but that was not it at all. Oh, there was plenty of beer to be swilled at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium, 35 beers in all, from 12 regional breweries. But we were also there for the food and live music and other festivities, although the sight of a half-dozen grown men in lederhosen and alpine hats near a bandstand naturally had me concerned.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By SUN STAFF | October 17, 2002
Put your wheels in motion at the Tour du Port Get ready to strap on your helmet and start pedaling. Sunday is the 10th annual Tour du Port at the Inner Harbor. Join hundreds of cyclists in biking a 22-mile course or a 9-mile loop along a scenic waterfront route, beginning and ending at Rash Field. A "We Made It!" celebration, with lunch and entertainment, follows. Riders may begin on the route between 7:30 a.m. and 9 a.m., and must be off by 11:30 a.m. On-site registration begins at 7 a.m. The fee is $30 for adults, $20 for children 12 and under.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 13, 2002
THE FERNDALE Roadrunners, a senior social group, is throwing itself a birthday party from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Oct. 24 at La Fontaine Bleu in Glen Burnie. John Norfolk will perform on the keyboard. Members, associate members and friends of the club are invited. The cost is $15. Reservations must be made by Thursday. During the club's 30-year history, there have been two presidents, Ethel Schmidt, the club's founder, and Melvia Scott, its current president. Schmidt, now deceased, saw the need for a senior citizens club in Ferndale and organized one at age 75. She was the club's first president when it began in 1972.
NEWS
By Dave Gordon and Dave Gordon,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2002
Using 400 pounds of tenderized pork, 45 dozen eggs, large pinches of paprika, salt, pepper, and mounds of bread crumbs, the Baltimore Kickers, a German culture club, whipped up enough schnitzel this week at its headquarters on South Broadway to feed the hundreds of partygoers expected at this weekend's Oktoberfest. In its 33rd year, the Oktoberfest is an celebration of gemutlichkeit, or the good life. Along with Old World comfort food, such as schnitzel, sauerbraten and strudel, organizers promise a full menu of German music, dancing and beer.
NEWS
By Dave Gordon and Dave Gordon,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2002
Using 400 pounds of tenderized pork, 45 dozen eggs, large pinches of paprika, salt, pepper, and mounds of bread crumbs, the Baltimore Kickers, a German culture club, whipped up enough schnitzel this week at its headquarters on South Broadway to feed the hundreds of party-goers expected at this weekend's Oktoberfest. In its 33rd year, the Oktoberfest is an celebration of gemutlichkeit, or the good life. Along with Old World comfort food, such as schnitzel, sauerbraten and strudel, organizers promise a full menu of German music, dancing and beer.
NEWS
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 2002
So you couldn't make it to Munich and your hopes of celebrating Oktoberfest are dashed for yet another year. Don't cry in your beer. You can still celebrate. Combine hearty food and strong beer with friendly company in an outdoor setting and you've got your own Oktoberfest -- without the trans-Atlantic flight. Harry Peemoeller, an instructor at Johnson & Wales University's Norfolk, Va. campus, says holding an Oktoberfest celebration is a great way "to enjoy the last comfortable nights outside."
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | September 25, 2002
WHEN I THINK of party-hearty types, the Germans don't automatically come to mind. Yet during this stretch of September and October, not only do Germans loosen up their lederhosen, they lead the world in a celebration of suds known as Oktoberfest. The official Oktoberfest shindig runs from Sept. 21 to Oct. 6 in the beer halls of Munich. The party got started back in October of 1810 as a bash marking the marriage of Crown Prince Ludwig to Princess Therese of Saxony-Hildburghausen. Also figuring in the festivities was the old-time practice of drinking up the Marzen, the lager that had been stashed in March (Marzen)
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | October 3, 2001
IT IS AUTUMN and the beers, like the leaves, are turning brown. The leaves are changing color because their yellow or orange carotenoids are becoming more prominent. The seasonal beers turn amber or copper-colored because their malt is roasted longer. These color clues are signs that Oktoberfest is here. For fans of seasonal beers this means that when the leaves start dropping, the bottle tops start popping. On one level, Oktoberfest is remarkably simple. It is another excuse to drink beer.
NEWS
September 19, 2001
Knights of Columbus Father McGivney Council No. 7025 of Glen Burnie will sponsor an Oktoberfest celebration from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. Sept. 29 at the council, 7025 McGivney Way. The event will feature knockwurst, sauerkraut, German potato salad, German music and German costumes. The event is open to those age 21 and older. The cost is $8 for singles and $15 for couples. No tickets will be sold at the door. Proceeds will go to local charities. Information: 410-760-9764. Internet training for adults to be offered at libraries Registration begins today for "Click Here," Anne Arundel County Public Library's free Internet and library Web catalog training class for adults at branches including the North County branch at 1010 Eastway, Glen Burnie.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2001
Francis Pramschufer Jr., a leader in Maryland's German-American community for more than 50 years and a founder of Baltimore's Oktoberfest, died Jan. 24 of bone cancer at his Hamilton residence. He was 82. A tall man, Mr. Pramschufer was easily recognizable at the annual Oktoberfest held at the 5th Regiment Armory, or the German Festival in Baltimore's Carroll Park. He would dress in a pair of lederhosen, a white shirt with a dark green embroidered tie and a forest-green Tyrolean hat. His face was highlighted by a dark, carefully trimmed mustache and a wide smile.
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