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Oksana Baiul

SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | November 4, 1994
The TV Repairman:A decade ago, when the Breeders' Cup sprang out of the fertile mind of someone, two guys named Tom, Hammond and Durkin, host and race caller, respectively, for NBC's coverage, gasped in unison, "We're on for four hours, how are we going to fill that much time?"The network went in with lots of features, which, according to Hammond, "we never got to. Right off we thought, hey, we don't have enough time." So the 11th edition tomorrow will be four hours, 30 minutes in length, from 1 p.m. to 5:30 p.m."
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SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | April 8, 1994
The TV Repairman:Maybe it tells us something about golf coverage on TV, those 15-minute Masters wrap-up shows last night and tonight (11:35-11:50) ranking among the 10 highest-rated golf shows each year. Are the masses suggesting that three-, four- and five-hour shows weekend afternoons are just too much time to spend watching? Especially when networks have been known to go away from so many tournaments due to time constraints.CBS theorizes that the format of the late-night shows of reviewing the best shots of the day and talking to some of the leaders and signing off is the reason for the popularity.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | April 4, 1995
News . . . but Mostly Views:Two more "sports," surfing and ballroom dancing, are looking ultimately to make it into the Olympic Games as medal events, being granted provisional recognition, and I say loudly and clearly: GOOD. The more the merrier.The Games, be they the Summer or Winter variety, simply aren't crowded enough at this point with just 34 medal sports on the menu. And besides, anyone who has been subjected to synchronized swimming or gymnastics, knows it's time for a little "Saturday Night Fever" and "Endless Summer."
SPORTS
By RANDY HARVEY and RANDY HARVEY,SUN REPORTER | February 24, 2006
TURIN, Italy -- The judges for the Winter Olympics women's figure skating competition got it right. What fun is that? Of course, there was hardly any way they could have gotten it wrong after yesterday's long program. Not even the French judge would have dared try to fix this one. Skaters have complained that the ice at the Palavela is soft, but that was a good thing in this case. Considering how many of them fell on it, someone could have been seriously injured. The winner: the only one standing.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | February 28, 1994
LILLEHAMMER, Norway -- You saw it on television. You know who won.Nancy Kerrigan won. Even thought she didn't win a gold medal, she still got to go to Disney World and claim her fortune.Oksana Baiul won. Hopefully, her next 16 years will be as happy as her first 16 were sad.Bonnie Blair and Dan Jansen won. As usual, and finally.CBS won -- not that it deserved to. (If there is any justice, the network should not only pay Tonya Harding's legal bills, but also give her a job. She was good to them.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN SPORTS MEDIA CRITIC | February 24, 1998
Historians and those who measure time may quibble over whether the just-concluded Winter Olympics are the last Games of the millennium, but, from a television standpoint, the event is about to enter a new era.That's because, starting with the Summer Games of 2000 in Sydney, Australia, NBC will take over telecast control of the Olympics -- winter and summer -- through 2008. And right off the bat, NBC executives will be confronted with the decision of whether, in the wake of CBS' diminished ratings return for the just-completed Nagano Games, to shake up the tried and true formula of presenting the Olympics to an American television audience.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | November 8, 1994
Let's face it: "Ice Wars: The U.S.A. vs. The World," the two-night made-for-television ice skating extravaganza, would be nothing more than the idle ruminations of a network executive if not for last winter's "Tonya Harding Free-For-All."For those of you hiding under rocks (and there weren't many, according to the Winter Olympics ratings), Nancy Kerrigan was nearly taken out of the run for the gold with a well-placed shot to her right knee at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships.Harding and Kerrigan made the trip to Lillehammer, Norway, for the Olympics, and the first night of the women's competition drew the fourth-largest audience in television history and was the sixth-highest-rated telecast of all time.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
Michael Weiss is talking on the phone as he zooms along Interstate 95 in his Dodge Viper with its 450-horsepower engine.The goateed figure skater, who became the U.S. champion in February and the bronze-medal winner at the world championships last month, has just been asked what moment in his life has been most special.There is a slight pause."A lot of people would think it would be something that happened on the ice," said Weiss, 22. "But, for me, it's something that happened after I was finished skating."
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 20, 1998
NAGANO, Japan -- We're No. 2.It's not exactly the slogan you hear at the Winter Olympics. But that's what winning the silver medal is all about.You're not first. You're not third. You haven't won. But you haven't really lost, either. It is the toughest medal of all to deal with for many Olympians.And today, it's the medal that Michelle Kwan and Tara Lipinski would like to avoid.These two terrific, teen-aged figure skaters are out to claim the women's title at the Winter Olympics. In all likelihood, one of them is bound for the most valuable gold at the Olympics, while the other is headed for a silver.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | January 10, 1994
DETROIT -- Tonya Harding skates with a swagger and wins with a smile.Her passions run from shooting pool to rebuilding auto transmissions.And in a demure sport where even the skaters who are ripped off by judges grin and bear it, Harding is not afraid to voice her opinion."
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