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Oksana Baiul

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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff writer | April 22, 1993
Frozen on the Baltimore Arena ice, Christopher Dean and Jayne Torvill balance in an intertwined stance, each supporting the other at an impossible angle, their flowing costumes forming a purple and orange "X."Does the pose have a name?"We call it 'Happy To Be There,' " says Mr. Dean. "That's a joke, because that's the end of our program."The British ice dancers, who won a gold medal at the 1984 Olympic Winter Games with their interpretation of Ravel's "Bolero," are among the headliners of the 1993 Tour of World Figure Skating Champions.
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SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | February 26, 1994
Maybe CBS' figure skating announcers were trying to be totally objective to Tonya Harding. Or maybe they weren't.In any case, the resentment crept through in the comments from Verne Lundquist and Scott Hamilton last night.CBS' cameras outside the ice rink (Hallway Cam?) caught Harding having trouble getting her skates laced when it was her time to come out for her long program.(As Harding later told CBS' Tracy Wilson, she had broken a lace and couldn't find one that fit.)Hamilton said: "Things like this just don't happen," adding that a skater should go ahead and perform anyway at that point.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1995
LANDOVER -- Their choice of music seemed fitting. More than a decade removed from winning the 1984 Olympic gold medal in Sarajevo, Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean had switched from classical to pop, from "Bolero" to "Still Crazy After All These Years."Still winning, too.During a near-perfect performance in the World Professional Figure Skating Championships, the legendary British dance team showed a sellout crowd at USAir Arena on Saturday night that precise footwork and a little personality still beat dramatics.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | February 26, 1994
Nancy Kerrigan beamed. Oksana Baiul bawled. And Tonya Harding took a big wad of gum out of her mouth.So went the Olympic women's figure skating finals last night on CBS.Kerrigan took the ice at 10:38, the same time as on Wednesday. It was good enough for huge ratings that night, CBS must have figured, so let's do it again.Kerrigan skated a fabulous program, and announcers Scott Hamilton and Verne Lundquist gushed."She's grown so much as a skater, an athlete and a person this year," Hamilton said.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1994
HAMAR, Norway -- Katarina Witt showed up at the Winter Olympics dressed as a man last night.Call her Robin Hood.She shot an imaginary arrow. She marched against her enemies. She turned triple jumps over rivers.And she turned back the competitive clock, barging her way into sixth place in the women's technical program."I'm really proud," she said. "The truth is, I don't care. It's not the medals I came back for."The strange thing is, she may have put herself back into Olympic medal contention.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | April 8, 1994
The TV Repairman:Maybe it tells us something about golf coverage on TV, those 15-minute Masters wrap-up shows last night and tonight (11:35-11:50) ranking among the 10 highest-rated golf shows each year. Are the masses suggesting that three-, four- and five-hour shows weekend afternoons are just too much time to spend watching? Especially when networks have been known to go away from so many tournaments due to time constraints.CBS theorizes that the format of the late-night shows of reviewing the best shots of the day and talking to some of the leaders and signing off is the reason for the popularity.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | October 4, 1994
OK, so, without a collective bargaining agreement between the players and the owners, no one really knows what the baseball free-agent rules are, but that won't matter since the Orioles' most valuable free agent isn't bound by a CBA anyway.Mark McLemore and Mike Devereaux may draw the biggest headlines, but the Orioles' negotiations with announcer Jon Miller will be of no small importance either.Miller, widely regarded as one of baseball's best play-by-play men, is up for grabs, as his one-year pact with the Orioles expired with the end of his 12th season with the club.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | April 4, 1995
News . . . but Mostly Views:Two more "sports," surfing and ballroom dancing, are looking ultimately to make it into the Olympic Games as medal events, being granted provisional recognition, and I say loudly and clearly: GOOD. The more the merrier.The Games, be they the Summer or Winter variety, simply aren't crowded enough at this point with just 34 medal sports on the menu. And besides, anyone who has been subjected to synchronized swimming or gymnastics, knows it's time for a little "Saturday Night Fever" and "Endless Summer."
SPORTS
By RANDY HARVEY and RANDY HARVEY,SUN REPORTER | February 24, 2006
TURIN, Italy -- The judges for the Winter Olympics women's figure skating competition got it right. What fun is that? Of course, there was hardly any way they could have gotten it wrong after yesterday's long program. Not even the French judge would have dared try to fix this one. Skaters have complained that the ice at the Palavela is soft, but that was a good thing in this case. Considering how many of them fell on it, someone could have been seriously injured. The winner: the only one standing.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | November 4, 1994
The TV Repairman:A decade ago, when the Breeders' Cup sprang out of the fertile mind of someone, two guys named Tom, Hammond and Durkin, host and race caller, respectively, for NBC's coverage, gasped in unison, "We're on for four hours, how are we going to fill that much time?"The network went in with lots of features, which, according to Hammond, "we never got to. Right off we thought, hey, we don't have enough time." So the 11th edition tomorrow will be four hours, 30 minutes in length, from 1 p.m. to 5:30 p.m."
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