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Oksana Baiul

SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | February 25, 1994
The TV Repairman:Even on the nights it can't train its cameras on the skaters, CBS has done an exceptional job sustaining the interest in the competition with a series of previews that come close to matching the real thing.For instance, last night's report on the injuries suffered by world champion Oksana Baiul and Tanja Szewczenko in a collision during practice carried all the urgency of a Super Bowl quarterback hurting his arm the week of the big game.Then the net brought in the first team, Charles Kuralt, to tell the story of what 1960 champion Carol Heiss calls "the five sisters," the U.S. women who have captured gold medals since 1956.
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SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | February 26, 1994
HAMAR, Norway -- Viktor Petrenko remembered the little girl who was alone, the one that would sleep inside a skating rink, that would practice at all hours, refining jumps and spins, finally growing into an Olympic champion.He was once Ukraine's greatest skating champion. She was an orphan, Oksana Baiul. She never knew her father. Her mother was dead. So were her grandparents."She has had a difficult life," said Petrenko, the 1992 Olympic men's skating gold medalist. "And now, it's like she has gotten back what she has lost.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | April 4, 1995
News . . . but Mostly Views:Two more "sports," surfing and ballroom dancing, are looking ultimately to make it into the Olympic Games as medal events, being granted provisional recognition, and I say loudly and clearly: GOOD. The more the merrier.The Games, be they the Summer or Winter variety, simply aren't crowded enough at this point with just 34 medal sports on the menu. And besides, anyone who has been subjected to synchronized swimming or gymnastics, knows it's time for a little "Saturday Night Fever" and "Endless Summer."
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1994
HAMAR, Norway -- Katarina Witt showed up at the Winter Olympics dressed as a man last night.Call her Robin Hood.She shot an imaginary arrow. She marched against her enemies. She turned triple jumps over rivers.And she turned back the competitive clock, barging her way into sixth place in the women's technical program."I'm really proud," she said. "The truth is, I don't care. It's not the medals I came back for."The strange thing is, she may have put herself back into Olympic medal contention.
SPORTS
By RANDY HARVEY and RANDY HARVEY,SUN REPORTER | February 24, 2006
TURIN, Italy -- The judges for the Winter Olympics women's figure skating competition got it right. What fun is that? Of course, there was hardly any way they could have gotten it wrong after yesterday's long program. Not even the French judge would have dared try to fix this one. Skaters have complained that the ice at the Palavela is soft, but that was a good thing in this case. Considering how many of them fell on it, someone could have been seriously injured. The winner: the only one standing.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | February 28, 1994
LILLEHAMMER, Norway -- You saw it on television. You know who won.Nancy Kerrigan won. Even thought she didn't win a gold medal, she still got to go to Disney World and claim her fortune.Oksana Baiul won. Hopefully, her next 16 years will be as happy as her first 16 were sad.Bonnie Blair and Dan Jansen won. As usual, and finally.CBS won -- not that it deserved to. (If there is any justice, the network should not only pay Tonya Harding's legal bills, but also give her a job. She was good to them.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | December 7, 1993
WHENEVER I find myself growing grim about the mouth; whenever it is a damp, drizzly November in my soul; whenever I find myself involuntarily pausing before coffin warehouses, then I account it high time to consult People magazine as soon as I can, for I recognize the symptoms all too clearly. Elitism has cast its pall upon me.The mail confirms it. "Elitist!" growls the displeased reader, proud of being that celebrity-besotted corporate human, The Common Person, which is composed of The Common Man and The Common Woman.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN SPORTS MEDIA CRITIC | February 24, 1998
Historians and those who measure time may quibble over whether the just-concluded Winter Olympics are the last Games of the millennium, but, from a television standpoint, the event is about to enter a new era.That's because, starting with the Summer Games of 2000 in Sydney, Australia, NBC will take over telecast control of the Olympics -- winter and summer -- through 2008. And right off the bat, NBC executives will be confronted with the decision of whether, in the wake of CBS' diminished ratings return for the just-completed Nagano Games, to shake up the tried and true formula of presenting the Olympics to an American television audience.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | November 8, 1994
Let's face it: "Ice Wars: The U.S.A. vs. The World," the two-night made-for-television ice skating extravaganza, would be nothing more than the idle ruminations of a network executive if not for last winter's "Tonya Harding Free-For-All."For those of you hiding under rocks (and there weren't many, according to the Winter Olympics ratings), Nancy Kerrigan was nearly taken out of the run for the gold with a well-placed shot to her right knee at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships.Harding and Kerrigan made the trip to Lillehammer, Norway, for the Olympics, and the first night of the women's competition drew the fourth-largest audience in television history and was the sixth-highest-rated telecast of all time.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
Michael Weiss is talking on the phone as he zooms along Interstate 95 in his Dodge Viper with its 450-horsepower engine.The goateed figure skater, who became the U.S. champion in February and the bronze-medal winner at the world championships last month, has just been asked what moment in his life has been most special.There is a slight pause."A lot of people would think it would be something that happened on the ice," said Weiss, 22. "But, for me, it's something that happened after I was finished skating."
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