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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1997
These recipes for a white turkey chili and an okra and tomato casserole promise pleasant dining.A flavorful white turkey chili was the request of Carol DiMattina of Bethesda. She really liked the flavor of one she had "at a deli/take-out restaurant called La Prima and they used chunk pieces of canned cooked turkey but I can substitute my own turkey or chicken. The other ingredients were marvelous and a bit different like cheese, chilies and onions. Can you help?"Identical recipes, chosen by Chef Gilles Syglowski as "very good" were sent in by D. Smith of Clinton, N.C., and Sandra Hayslett of Olney.
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NEWS
By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 6, 2005
Canned tomatoes and frozen sliced okra offer shortcuts to success by adding a colorful flavor boost to this comfort soup. Using a between-season lineup of vegetables available now in the produce section, this hearty dinner satisfies while we await spring vegetables. Substitute tilapia or red snapper fillets if you don't have a taste for catfish, and call it seafood soup. Tip Buy shredded cabbage from the supermarket to save chopping time. Catfish Soup Preparation time: 15 minutes; cooking time: 25 minutes Makes 8 servings 4 slices bacon, cut into 1-inch pieces 2 each, quartered: small red onion, ribs celery 1 carrot, quartered 2 cloves garlic 1/2 teaspoon salt freshly ground pepper 1/2 teaspoon hot pepper flakes 2 cans (14 1/2 ounces each)
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 12, 2013
It's Fat Tuesday and many of us are going to indulge in rich gumbos, savory jambalayas and sweet beignets in honor of the occasion. Eating healthy may seem fruitless on a day devoted to high-calorie, rich foods. But there are ways to make healthier versions of our favorite Fat Tuesday dishes. Eatingwell.com offers this healthy sausage gumbo recipe. Ingredients 12 ounces hot Italian turkey sausage links, removed from casings 2 teaspoons canola oil 1 large onion, diced 4 cloves garlic, minced 1 teaspoon Cajun seasoning 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 4 cups chopped tomatoes 4 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth 2 1/2 cups frozen chopped okra 3/4 cup instant brown rice 1 bunch scallions, trimmed and sliced (optional)
NEWS
By DeNita S.B. Morris and DeNita S.B. Morris,los angeles times syndicate international | February 18, 2001
During Black History Month, a lot of attention is given to the cuisine of African-Americans, traditional soul food. But some folks are likely to pass on such food, thinking it's automatically high in fat and calories. You know -- greasy fried chicken, collard greens laced with fatback and dense, rich desserts. Well, there's a new generation of at-home cooks and professional chefs who whip up good-tasting, low-fat versions of such beloved foods. They take what Grandma made and improve upon it, using different fats (replacing lard or shortening, for example, with olive or canola oil)
FEATURES
By Sujata Banerjee and Sujata Banerjee,Evening Sun Staff | January 9, 1991
TO TASTE AFRICAN-American cooking is to taste the world. African, Caribbean, Latin American, southern American, and even New England cooking. So writes John Pinderhughes, author of "Family of the Spirit Cookbook" (Simon and Schuster, 1990, $24.95), a book of recipes and remembrances from African-American kitchens.Pinderhughes, who is related to former Baltimore City Schools superintendent Alice Pinderhughes, takes a relaxed, familial approach to illustrating a world of different cuisines.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, Special To The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2012
Khalid Chaudry won't give up the recipes behind the food at his new Mount Vernon restaurant, Alladin Kabob. When pressed about the magic behind the meat samosas, or the sprinkle of red powder on a lemon sitting atop a small salad, the restaurant's owner demurred. "Those are our spices," he said. "It's our secret. " Whatever those secret spice combinations are, they work. Alladin Kabob's menu stretches across the Middle East and through India, with a few American dishes thrown into the mix. Regardless of point of origin, Chaudry's food is expertly seasoned.
FEATURES
By Janet Hazen and Janet Hazen,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE Rita Calvert contributed to this article | January 31, 1996
Preparing one of the classics is a good way to satisfy the need to nestle up to something familiar, comforting and tasty during the winter season, when we like to lie low and simplify. But some of these time-honored dishes require days of shopping for ingredients and even more time spent chopping, peeling, stewing and assembling.The solution is easy: classics made with a few shortcuts that add to the quality of your life but don't detract from the quality of the dish.Classic stews and casseroles are the ideal dinner this time of year.
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | June 5, 1994
Most of them won't win any beauty contests. Some look like aliens from "Star Wars." Others are as slimy as garden slugs.Meet the wallflowers of the vegetable world, odd-looking plants and roots that will never grace the covers of gardening magazines. Some are so loathsome they've gone underground.Nonetheless, these vegetables survive, thanks to the cadre of gardeners who grow them.Tomatoes, peppers and zucchini, they're not. But to their loyal followers, the also-rans are as popular as the backyard favorites.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 7, 1991
The Colorado effort to legislate kindness toward fruit and vegetables has me wondering.The legislation, passed this week by the Colorado House and sent to the governor, is a reaction to the downturn in apples sales following the Alar scare of 1989.According to wire stories coming out of Denver, the bill enables producers of perishable agricultural products to sue anyone who maliciously or negligently disparages their goods.I take that to mean that if you insult fruits and vegetables in Colorado, it can cost you.My question is, how will they know?
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | July 29, 2007
SHE MAY LOOK AND SOUND LIKE Paula Deen and she is really into food ("The only thing I don't like is boiled okra."), but Marcia S. Harris, president of the Restaurant Association of Maryland, doesn't have a TV show. However, she does like watching television -- including MTV -- and she admires Deen. "I love her exuberance for food, her lack of fear for food. Growing up in the south [Memphis, Tenn.] as I did, her kind of cooking is very appealing to me. There's nothing that butter hasn't made better."
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